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I managed to change my front tire yesterday---rode today. Any of you more senior guy,s have any help as I take on the rear tire tomorrow? Never did it before. Sorry if this is a redundant question. Thanks in advance!
 

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It's very easy, as long as you can support the bike.. Take the rear brake caliper off, and.. Eh.. Just follow what they do on this...

and part 2 of 2, plus his front tire video..
 

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Thanks for posting this video! I've gathered up all the stuff I need and have been practicing all Winter on a cheap "Dirt Bike Enduro" tire and wheel combo I bought off eBay for $20 to get used to the process and using my tools, peeling the tire off, pulling out and putting in the tube and tire, airing it back up, etc. But, I have yet to actually remove my wheels and change the tires on my KLR, which I plan to do next month. I have a Clymer manual, but it's nice having this video handy. I think the actual rear KLR tire will be a little "tougher" to change than the wheel/tire I bought to practice on.

Can't remember what size the eBay tire/wheel I bought was, but it's kind of between the front and rear KLR tires/wheels. I'm waiting for a hot, sunny day to do the change; figured it might make the tires a little easier to work with.

I just put a couple of concrete blocks under my peg brackets (I have peg-lowering brackets) and then rock the bike back and forth and add plywood shims on top of the blocks and under the peg brackets until the wheels are off the ground and the bike is stable, kind of a "poor man's bike lift." I came up with this method to install my raising links and it should work fine for doing the tires.

I hadn't seen this video and it's nice to actually SEE somebody doing the wheel removal/install on a KLR (same year as mine) as opposed to READING it. Thanks again!
 

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I found that it helps to have a box of band-aids close at hand.
 

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I was glad the video helped.. It's easier to post the link and let you watch it a few times, than try to type that sort of info out.. And then you might still be confused..

I love my little netbook.. I'll bring up a video and take it out to the bike, and have it play while I'm right there.. It saves a lot of time than can be used for enjoying a beer, later.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks

Just wanted to see what steps folks used to remove rear. Got the tire change thing down--I think!
 

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Uh... that video isn't great, try these...



There's no need to take off the brake caliper when you take off the wheel.
If you do take it off be sure to use loctite when you put it back on!
 

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There's no need to take off the brake caliper when you take off the wheel.
If you do take it off be sure to use loctite when you put it back on!
I like to take the caliper off for 2 reasons.. Easier to align the axle and alignment cover/rim/spacers/etc without the caliper in the way AND you can inspect the pads easier.. It's just 2 bolts.. :)
 

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a bucket works good to work on the wheel
baby powder on the tube
make sure you press the tire into the centre of the rim before trying to get it off and more importantly back ON.
 

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Probably too late for tomorrow, but these little valve stem tools sure make fishing the stem through the rim quite a bit easier.

The sidewalls on some tires are stiff and these save your hands. Most shops carry them.


Stem tool
 

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Probably too late for tomorrow, but these little valve stem tools sure make fishing the stem through the rim quite a bit easier.

The sidewalls on some tires are stiff and these save your hands. Most shops carry them.

Watch Doug starting about 2:30 in part 2 of the tire change videos, pretty slick.
 

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Those are some good tire-changing videos Spec posted. I know that Bridgestone guy has probably changed thousands of tires, but those ones he's working with seem a hell of a lot easier to work with than any I've changed, which admittedly isn't that many, but I've experienced a few.

Not to knock his skill, but it just seems like those tires are a lot more loose-fitting on the rim and I'm guessing are a softer material since they're strictly dirt tires? They seem a lot more pliable than any tires I've dealt with. I guess it could also be 100 degrees or so where he's doing it and that could be a factor. Or, maybe he's just so good at it he makes it look easy.

I like his technique of putting all three irons in at the same time. I'll have to try that "hang the tube off your finger until it forms a crease" idea, too. Good videos. Thanks for posting these.

As with all things, it's a lot easier to understand this stuff when you see it done, as opposed to reading about it. It's even better when the guy doing it knows those little tips and tricks that could take you years to learn on your own, if you ever did.
 

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Probably too late for tomorrow, but these little valve stem tools sure make fishing the stem through the rim quite a bit easier.

The sidewalls on some tires are stiff and these save your hands. Most shops carry them.


Stem tool
Don't know how it applies to the actual KLR tires since I haven't done them yet, but when I bought my cheap "practice tire," I had to stop my practice real quick when I found out there was absolutely no way I could get the valve stem back through the hole in the rim without one of these. I couldn't have done it if my life depended on it.

I had to order one and wait for it to arrive before I could finish the tire because I just could not get my large hands inside the tire to push the stem through the hole.

So, in my case, one of these valve stem fishing tools is a must-have.

Probably the only valuable tip I might have in this thread is to consider painting some of your smaller tools, like one of these fishing stems, your valve core remover, etc. fluorescent orange. I misplace mine all the time: makes 'em easier to see.

Actually, I do this to all the tools I carry on my KLR. If they're not small enough to paint the whole thing (or it's something like a screwdriver or wrench tip where you don't want paint flaking off into something delicate) I just paint a stripe on the handle or something so I don't leave them laying somewhere when I'm done with the work.
 

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Not to knock his skill, but it just seems like those tires are a lot more loose-fitting on the rim and I'm guessing are a softer material since they're strictly dirt tires? They seem a lot more pliable than any tires I've dealt with. I guess it could also be 100 degrees or so where he's doing it and that could be a factor. Or, maybe he's just so good at it he makes it look easy.
Warming the tire by setting it in the sun does wonders for making them easier to handle. I've even put them inside a vehicle for an hour or so. Warm rubber is much easier to work with!

Kudo's to you for practicing! Have you tried patching a tube?

Sleddog
 

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Don't know how it applies to the actual KLR tires since I haven't done them yet, but when I bought my cheap "practice tire," I had to stop my practice real quick when I found out there was absolutely no way I could get the valve stem back through the hole in the rim without one of these. I couldn't have done it if my life depended on it.

I had to order one and wait for it to arrive before I could finish the tire because I just could not get my large hands inside the tire to push the stem through the hole.

So, in my case, one of these valve stem fishing tools is a must-have...

There's another way to get the valve stem in the 'ole...

The tire is off the rim and the tube partially inflated inside the tire. Vertically orient the tire with the valve to the bottom and sit the rim down onto the tire into the stem hole. Start the valve nut a few threads. Work one side of the tire on with the rim still vertical. Easier if you push down on the rim keeping the bead inside the dish.

Make sense?


BTW, Dude your avatar... ew!
 

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Warming the tire by setting it in the sun does wonders for making them easier to handle. I've even put them inside a vehicle for an hour or so. Warm rubber is much easier to work with!

Kudo's to you for practicing! Have you tried patching a tube?

Sleddog
Yes, believe it or not I purposefully drove a nail into the tire and through the tube and tried my patching skills. Guess I did okay. While the tire isn't under any load, it's still holding the same amount of air a month later.
 

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There's another way to get the valve stem in the 'ole...

The tire is off the rim and the tube partially inflated inside the tire. Vertically orient the tire with the valve to the bottom and sit the rim down onto the tire into the stem hole. Start the valve nut a few threads. Work one side of the tire on with the rim still vertical. Easier if you push down on the rim keeping the bead inside the dish.

Make sense?


BTW, Dude your avatar... ew!
Yeah, that makes complete sense. Never thought of that. I was always working with the tire horizontal.

As far as the avatar goes, I've been trying to learn how to do that myself, but I get tired of my wife always yelling at me "Stop picking your nose!"
 
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