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Discussion Starter #1
New boots are needed so looking for opinions/advice.
* Must be waterproof. I live in southwest BC, so lots of rain.
* Tall and offer good protection when I'm off road.
* Have to be comfortable for walking and moderate hiking.
I don't care about being stylish.
I don't care about color.
I care about safety.
 

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You are describing a compromise at best.

Motorcycle boots/shoes are designed for protecting your feet in a crash. Hiking boots will provide some protection (more than tennis shoes) but won't provide the protection/safety true motorcycle footwear will.

My suggestion is get some motorcycle boots with Gortex (yes, they will be pricey). But they will be dry and protect your feet/ankles in a crash. Pack your hiking boots for when you stop to hike.
 

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Most people advise to ride in motorcycle boots and they have a "leg to stand on" if you get in a crash. I just ride in hiking boots. I like a boot with a a curved bottom and not a sharp (90 degree) heel. I don't like having to pick my boot up over the peg. I wouldn't like riding in these, they'd just be for special occasions:
 

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I'm in the same situation. Looking for boots. I'm in North Central BC, but last year was very wet!
I've been using workboot\ hiking boots.

Hope you don't mind me following along!
 

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Protection is key for me.

Thus, I choose a boot with a HINGED ANKLE JOINT. My nomenclature may be incorrect, but . . . the boot has a fixed hinge at the ankle bend, providing stability in the event of a crash.

Not to push any particular brand, SIDI Adventure Rain Boots fit my requirements. Newer models exist; mine are "waterproof" with a proprietary liner; Goretex-lined models are available.



Do they work? Yes, in several crashes, at various speeds, on several surfaces from soft mud to hard pavement. Waterproof? Yes, externally, but . . . if you get into depth beyond the boot top, it will take FOREVER to dry the boots out! :)

If you're going SIDI, in the US, anyway; BRING MONEY! Some save by buying on-line from Europe, but looks like that trick takes some finesse and time.
 

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Last year I got a pair of the Forma tall adventure boots, and I love them. They are very comfortable !
They are lighter than motocross boots so not quite as much protection but still much more than hiking boots.
I have hiked in them for maybe 1/2 mile at a time and they were so comfortable. NOT like motocross boots, which are good for 100 yards before I hobble back to the bike . +1 on the Forma's
 

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SIDI Canyon Gore for me. Meets my needs and comfortable enough to walk in them several hours out of a day!
 

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You are describing a compromise at best.
My suggestion is get some motorcycle boots with Gortex (yes, they will be pricey). But they will be dry and protect your feet/ankles in a crash. Pack your hiking boots for when you stop to hike.
On big dirty adventures I ride in MX boots, and pack 3-4 pairs of heavy MX socks to change out daily, and a periodic wash/rinse. Also pack a lightweight pair of hikers for camp or day hikes.
I've had deep water come up over the top of the boots once or twice. Have worn these through several crashes, had them through cooler days where the daytime temp never got about 35dF (cold for desert rats), hotter days where temp maxed out at 118dF (always be drinking from the camelbak). But I've never regretted wearing MX boots on adventure rides.

For commuter duty or purely slab rides, I have the Sidi AllRoad and they have been comfy and waterproof. I have not put these through the crash-test scenario. The first set of these I got about 10 years and 50k miles out of, and these are a bit worn out on the velcro closure things. So keep 'em as a backup pair.

If safety comes first -don't compromise on the boot.
 

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boots

I don't care for anything with laces for fear they might attach themselves to a brake lever or shift lever, although I have worn them with the laces tucked into the boot or shoe.
 

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I wore my old BMW Savannah boots (by Sidi) while on my Arctic Circle ride and did quite a bit of walking around in them. It it initially took a few months of riding and walking in them before they felt quite comfortable. I wouldn't go hiking to far in them because, as others have pointed out, that's not what they are for.

Another one to consider is the military black combat style boot. They are waterproof and laced but zip up on the inside. The sole is a very sturdy waffle type. They offer good protection and are very comfortable for hiking or just walking into combat. :)
 

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I wear these and I've been very happy with their waterproofness. That said, they have a reputation for lacking traction, which I've also noticed. My plan is to take them to the shoe shop and have vibram soles glued on, because they feel like a good hybrid between protection and comfort.



Regarding using hiking boots, it reminds me of a friend who got in a low-speed fender bender on his Ninja last year. Hit the car in front of him at <20 mph. Wearing regular hikers, from one of which the sole came clean off (I'm actually not sure how this happened… did he put his foot down? etc.). I took this as indication that motorcycle boots are made to be in a crash, while hikers aren't. Totally different things.

Oh, also. I got them for <$150 new on eBay.
 

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Another vote for the Forma talls.....hiking boots just don't have enough protection. My Alpinestar Tech8's have way more protection but you can't walk in them for any real distance. I use the Formas for mixed use and the Tech8's for single track.

Dave
 

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I like my Forma ADV boots. I can wear them comfortably all day. I think price wise they are in the middle, you can get them on Amazon. I ride a lot in Sand as well as wet mountains. Had a 3 hour highway ride in flood warning rain conditions and stayed dry. I will buy again. I have one full season on them and feel like I will get one or two more.
 

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Howdy -

I've got the Forma Adventure (tall) boots also, and they're what I use on my off road camping adventures - there's always a lot of hiking, and they're pretty OK for that as far as flexibility and traction.

I would not recommend hiking boots that lack the protection of MX or Dual Sport boots - I went down on some gravel on the road a few years back and the swing arm landed on my foot, crushing some bones. It was bad, but it would have been much worse without those boots.
 

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Keep in mind that I do not yet have a motorcycle (hopefully this fixed in a couple days) but I have spent a lot of time on quads and even more time in the back country. I usually wear one of two types of boots. One is wildland firefighting boots and the other is combat boots. I always have my wildland firefighter boots set up with zippers but they are not always totally waterproof. They are also very heavy but give a lot of protection.

The boots I often hike in and will probably ride in as well are Bates temperate weather combat boots with Gortex lining. They are light, I can hike in them all day, they are water proof, and I think they are pretty sturdy.

I don't care for anything with laces for fear they might attach themselves to a brake lever or shift lever, although I have worn them with the laces tucked into the boot or shoe.
All of my lacers are at least 8" shafts such as the above mentioned boots or logger style boots. Years ago when I was doing wilderness search and rescue I was taught to tie the laces with a square knot and tuck the lace ends and tuck them into the boot shafts. They do not come untied this way and there are no loose laces to catch in anything.
 

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My opinion only, RANGER295: Wear what you will, but . . . high-end, purpose-built motorcycle boots possess a skill set quite different from the outdoor boots you mention. The boots I mention are designed for the CRASH, not the exertion of tramping through the wilds.

Not attempting to stampede you with a horror story, but . . . on ADV, an adventure rider took a brief run around his neighborhood after tuning his bike, wearing non-motorcycle boots (didn't bother to change footwear). Car hit him head-on; injury: Loss of toe, potential loss of foot (didn't happen); he's recovering at home and receiving physical therapy. Link to his posts upon request.

Further, not to push any particular vendor; I've proven my high-end, hinged-ankle adventure boots crash-worthy, more times than I care to remember. (Yeah, the DO cost lots of money!)
 

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My opinion only, RANGER295: Wear what you will, but...

Not attempting to stampede you with a horror story, but . . . on ADV, an adventure rider took a brief run around his neighborhood after tuning his bike, wearing non-motorcycle boots (didn't bother to change footwear). Car hit him head-on; injury: Loss of toe, potential loss of foot (didn't happen); he's recovering at home and receiving physical therapy.
Better boots? How about, maybe he would have been safer in a car? Life is dangerous, weigh out the risks with your preferences. My opinion only.

Fun fact: I lost a toe and part of my foot while wearing racing boots (circa 1984). These days, I ride in "hiking boots".
 

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My opinion only, RANGER295: Wear what you will, but . . . high-end, purpose-built motorcycle boots possess a skill set quite different from the outdoor boots you mention. The boots I mention are designed for the CRASH, not the exertion of tramping through the wilds.

Not attempting to stampede you with a horror story, but . . . on ADV, an adventure rider took a brief run around his neighborhood after tuning his bike, wearing non-motorcycle boots (didn't bother to change footwear). Car hit him head-on; injury: Loss of toe, potential loss of foot (didn't happen); he's recovering at home and receiving physical therapy. Link to his posts upon request.

Further, not to push any particular vendor; I've proven my high-end, hinged-ankle adventure boots crash-worthy, more times than I care to remember. (Yeah, the DO cost lots of money!)
I hear what you are saying and would not debate for a second that true riding boots like you mention would be safer. The problem is the OP asked for something to both ride in and hike in. The boots you pictured do not look like something I would want to hike in. In my college days I was into mountaineering. My girlfriend at the time and I had a goal of climbing all the 14,000+ foot peaks in California. I have always been someone that buys high quality gear but I did not want to buy two pairs of boots, one for hiking and one for mountaineering because I was spending around $300 for a pair of boots so I went with a high end hybrid boot. I ended up being miserable with it. The boot was too heavy and stiff for regular hiking and it was not stiff enough for serious mountaineering when I put crampons on and was on ice fields and doing real climbing. My experience is when you get something to do multiple tasks that are different, they do none of them well. It is like a Shopsmith wood working machine. It will get the job done if you live in town and do not have room for a bunch of pieces of equipment but I would not trade my three table saws, two drill presses, two lathes, two jointers, planer, shaper and router table for one because each piece of stand alone equipment does the designated job the best.

For hiking I would rather have a hiking boot, for riding I would rather have a riding boot, If I had to pick one for both I would use either quality combat boots (not commercial lookalikes) or wildland firefighting boots which are basically beefed up loggers depending on which I was doing more of. I am fine with horror stories and trust me I have seen more first hand than probably most on here being a part time/reserve firefighter. I have seen a lot of people die in motorcycle accidents. I saw one guy that only lived because he carried a tourniquet with him. he got sideswiped on a two lane rural highway and he left leg was basically severed. He would have bled out if he had not put the TQ on. I am a believer of full faced helmets because I have seen people die with skull caps that would have otherwise survived. The worst was one that went through a barbed wire fence and had most of his face ripped off. he ended up dying a few hours later but other than his face, his injuries were minimal and a full faced helmet would have saved him. We all take calculated risks and need to make our choices. I spent 4-5 hours on a tractor today. Statistically speaking, I am more likely to be killed on a tractor than I am a motorcycle. What I would probably do in the OP's position is carry an extra set of hiking boots on the bike to switch into. They are light and compact.

I do appreciate the boot recommendation though. I am sort of looking for a good riding boot.
 

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I hear you, RANGER295!

It's been done, but I wouldn't want to hike 7 miles or climb a mountain with those SIDIs (Post # 6 from page 1) on my feet!

Best wishes for your safety, whatever footwear you choose.
 
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