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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey, folks.

I'm closing on my dealer hold over 2015 tomorrow after work.

As part of the package, I'm getting some dealer work performed at a reduced rate.

So far, they are installing heated grips and mounting my Bark Busters.

While it's in the shop, I was thinking about having them drill holes and mount a rim locks on the front and back.

I understand that they are typically mounted 180 degrees opposite the valve stem. Balancing the wheel will also be required. One also has to be mindful to mount the rim lock in a location such that best affords wrench access later.

With the rim locks, I will be able run at a lower pressure off road with reduced risk of breaking the bead and pinching or "spinning" my tube. There may also be an additional margin of safety for sudden on road flats, or so I read.

The only downsides that I can find are that roadside flat repairs have a slight bump in difficulty and, more importantly, incorrectly balanced tires will create wobbling or vibration at high speeds.

Is that about the gist of it?

Am I missing anything else? Anything to check for?
 

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Your bike, but unless you plan on running less than 15 psi, I think rim locks may be an elegant solution to a non-existent problem on a KLR650. The typical KLR650 isn't likely to spin tires at 15 psi inflation and above, from my experience and observation on the Shenandoah 500 dual-sport ride and others.

YMMV; and again: Your bike! :)
 

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I have had a problem with a very Slooow leak in my ft. tire since new.. Did the soap/bubble test.. nothing.. changed the valve core.. still have a very slow leak.. If I air it up to 27 lbs and ride it all day fine.. but if I leave it sitting for 3 days it will be down to 14 psi etc.. Well one day I was riding in the beginning of the tire problem and got home and my pressure was 5 lbs.... So the moral of the story is the bead won't break at a very low pressure and even at highway speeds..
 

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I agree with Damocles. Bead locks do have a purpose on truly off-road motorcycles, not so much as one moves into the adventure class of motorcycles. Personally, don't have rim locks on my 2016 and I run in a lot of sand and mud at pressures 15-18 with big block knobbies (Conti TKC80 Twinduros). So far, three dual sport rallys later, I haven't lost a bead...knock on wood.

If I ever did go the route of rim locks, though, I probably wouldn't put one on the front.

As for other stuff, I appreciate that dealers are supposed to check everything, but I'd recommend checking for loose nuts, bolts and weird stuff just the same. I have found loose bolts on new bikes. Specifically on my KLR, I took delivery with different tires and the rear rubbed on the muffler.

Take a peek at the air filter. Mine was dry as a bone when I took delivery. Double check the chain tension as I've read most are delivered far too tight on the tension.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Crash bars and skid plate are arriving today along with the Barkbusters.

Funny, I was rethinking the rim locks before I even checked back here. As suggested above, they are a solution looking for a problem in my case, as I don't air down my tires.

I'll just have them mount the crash guard, instead.

While they're in there, double check the air filter as well.

Thanks!
 

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Crash bars and skid plate are arriving today along with the Barkbusters.

Funny, I was rethinking the rim locks before I even checked back here. As suggested above, they are a solution looking for a problem in my case, as I don't air down my tires.

I'll just have them mount the crash guard, instead.

While they're in there, double check the air filter as well.

Thanks!
Upon getting mine, the speedo cable was routed outside the fender guard, I was missing a bolt under the front fender, stock tire rubs the chain guard, missing a rear reflector, and coolant spills as the cap wasn't on correctly. Some also state that the chain is way too tight. Oh yeah, and the headlight points at the trees. Ridiculously too high. While closing the deal I would try to get the KLR tail bag. I can't say enough about that bag.
 

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Your bike, but unless you plan on running less than 15 psi, I think rim locks may be an elegant solution to a non-existent problem on a KLR650. The typical KLR650 isn't likely to spin tires at 15 psi inflation and above, from my experience and observation on the Shenandoah 500 dual-sport ride and others.

YMMV; and again: Your bike! :)
Agreed....and I'd add that due to the weight of the KLR I'd strongly recommend running at LEAST 15 PSI and usually closer to 20. At 18 - 22, the need for a rim lock is fairly low IMO.

I needed the rim locks on my race bike but I'd run the fronts at 12 - 14 PSI and the rear at 10 - 12 PSI.

Dave
 

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Hey, folks.

While it's in the shop, I was thinking about having them drill holes and mount a rim locks on the front and back.

I understand that they are typically mounted 180 degrees opposite the valve stem. Balancing the wheel will also be required. One also has to be mindful to mount the rim lock in a location such that best affords wrench access later.
I'll give another vote Against rim locks on the KLR.

And comment that if one drills 180 degrees from the valve stem the security bolt will be Exactly Between the Narrow Angled spokes instead of a Wide Angled pair.
Take notice that most Dirt Bike security bolts are just 4 spokes away from the valve stem for ease of dis-mount/re-mount. It really doesn't require much more wheel weight either.
I used to balance my KX500 wheels. Especially when running Ice Tires. :)
 

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This is the first time I've heard/read KLR and rim locks in the
same topic statement.


Can't hurt, likely won't help. Took me almost 90 psi to pop the bead on
the front K 270. I think it'll hold but I have never once aired down in my 34 years
on/offing.
 

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For the sake of clarity, the big negative about not having rim locks isn't breaking the bead (it's not like it's a tube-less tire) but rather that rotating the tire on the rim (front due to braking and rear due to power) can rip out the valve stem which causes a sudden and complete loss of air pressure. .....I still don't think rim locks are needed on a KLR but...

Dave
 

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Probably the very best solution on a KLR would be a Tubliss system with a tube-less type tire. The Tubliss locks the bead in place with a high pressure inner bladder, seals the spokes allowing for a tube less tire and lets you to run lower pressures without worrying about the bead, pinch flats, etc.....you can ride even with no pressure in the tire with the tubliss in place (got 3rd in one Hare Scramble with a flat front using this system) ....the biggest problem is that they don't make a 17" Tubliss system for the rear making an 18" rim swap necessary....which all gets pretty pricey, particularly with two KLR's!

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well, I picked up the bike yesterday evening and this conversation about tire pressure was very timely.

It's a good thing that I only live two miles from the dealership and didn't travel at high speeds.

When I got it home and took the obligatory social media picture, I noticed that that front tire looked low.

There was no tire pressure at all registering with the first gauge I tried. So I brought out a better quality unit that indicated 5 psi. On a hunch, I checked the rear and it was reading 16. According to the owner's manual, they should both be 21.

I double checked the copy of the assembly inspection sheet and, sure enough, the mechanic signed off indicating that he had checked the tire pressure.

According to what I read above, an emergency stop could have put a lot of pressure on the tube and valve stem, potentially causing an immediate blow out. I shudder to think what would have happened had I not caught it.

Now I'm doubting that anything else was inspected.
 

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subvetssn,
For asphalt and mixed roads, I'll strongly urge you to run 32-30 psi in the Front tire and 30-28 psi in the Rear tire. Theses pressures work well for riders in the 150-180 pound range. You can adjust for your weight or luggage or passenger.

Keep the 'skinny' front tire 2 psi higher that the fatter rear. Because most of the bike and your weight transfers to the Front during proper braking. Low front pressure will Cause accelerated cupping or scalloping of the front tire tread.

21 psi is ok for dirt roads, but not all roads.
 

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I'm not arguing on the tire pressure but I'm in the weight range you described. I have the oem tires and run factory recommended pressure of I believe 21/21. I have no cupping at all. And the handling is great. I'm at 3500 miles so far and still have tread left. I have virtually no chicken strip on the rear and have not had it kick out once on me. In fact the oem tires perform so well on the pavement I'm hesitant to change them. It's just the sand down here in Florida, going off pavement that makes me question it.
 

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Paul is right (especially about running more psi in the front unless carrying a passenger) but I'm lazy and I ride mostly around town and offroad so I keep mine at 21-22 always and just ride. If I was going to do a bunch of highway miles, I'd air up to high 20's - 30psi.

Dave
 

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I'm not arguing on the tire pressure but I'm in the weight range you described. I have the oem tires and run factory recommended pressure of I believe 21/21. I have no cupping at all. And the handling is great. I'm at 3500 miles so far and still have tread left. I have virtually no chicken strip on the rear and have not had it kick out once on me. In fact the oem tires perform so well on the pavement I'm hesitant to change them. It's just the sand down here in Florida, going off pavement that makes me question it.
After closer examination of the front tire and another 1k miles...I want to state that I do in fact have quite a bit of cupping on the sides of the front tire. The center of the tire seams ok but the tread to the left and right of the center line is almost at the tread indicator at 4300 miles and exhibits a lot of cupping. I will continue with the 21 recommended pressure as I like the grip in the paved corners but, I will add thats probably the cause for the cupping. My apologies earlier for stating I did not have cupping.
 

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I'm cleaning my rim.

The K 270 took 90 psi to seat with soap all the way around.
Now, doing the 705 front for the second time. It didn't fully pop
out at 115 psi !! It sat overnight like this and only moved a barely measurable
amount.

The rim has so much black buildup and bumps inside it's easy to see why a
bead won't slide out across this stuff. This isn't a tubeless tire and I'm not
using tire seating lube again. Wire brushed the whole thing, and going with
a much stronger dilute of soapy water this time.

This somewhat applies to this thread as I saw "teeth" around the full circumference
on the inner rim on both sides. That tire won't slip unless flat.
 
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