Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Rode up to Big Lake today to check out the destruction to the homes and State Park caused by this Summer's floods after the place finally dried out. In retrospect, it probably wasn't a good idea to travel off the beaten path to take pictures since they had to clear a foot of mud, sand and debris off the roads. A lot of cabins were destroyed, so I'm sure there was lumber and nails and stuff everywhere before they bladed off the roads.

I'd travelled about 20 miles heading home when one of the local "Ancient Ones" pulled out in front of me and was driving about 30 miles an hour. I was tempted to pass, but figured "What the hell? It's a nice day and I'm no hurry" so I just stayed behind her.

Coming up a long grade, the rear end started shimmying and as soon as I felt it I knew I'd run over something in the flood debris. Fortunately, at the top of the hill is a closed truck stop with lots of pavement.

I limped the last 50 yards or so to the truck stop and squeezed between two barriers to get into the empty parking lot.

I'd been pretty much hauling ass and negotiating some pretty good curves before I got stuck behind that old woman driving so slow. Fate? Perhaps. The tire could have deflated at a much worse time. Just past that truck stop, I was going to be doing a 4-mile jaunt down the Interstate at 70mph or so.

I figured since I had my camera along, I'd just chronicle the experience.

Here you can see the head of the nail that penetrated my tire. It went in the side of one of the knobs and must have been almost parallel with the inside surface of the tire and outside surface of the tube. That would explain why the tire lasted so long after I ran over it before the tube failed. It must have been rubbing on the inner tube while I was riding until the tube blew. It was one of those "Ultra Heavy Duty" tubes. Wonder if it lasted a little longer because of the extra thickness? I guess there's no way of knowing that.



Up on the Eagle Mike Quick-Jack with the tire removed. I was lucky. It was about 70 and sunny and it was nice having all that pavement around.



Getting one side of the tire off. As soon as I started looking for it, I remembered I'd taken the 6" aluminum c-clamp that I use for a bead breaker out of one of my bags and hadn't put it back in. Fortunately, the tires had only been on since April so I was able to break the bead with the spoons. I guess I'm lucky the bead held long enough for me to get off the road and into the parking lot without breaking loose on its own.

I sacrificed my FieldSheer mesh jacket as a pad on the concrete to protect the wheel/sprocket.



The new tube, talced and ready to go in. I didn't bother trying to patch the nail hole in the tire itself. This Winter, I'll take the tire back off and see if I can even find the hole and deal with it then.



New tube is in and the tire's hooked up to the Slime compressor to inflate. Good time for a smoke as this takes quite awhile.



This was the culprit: a galvanized nail about two inches long.



This is what happened to the inner tube.



A dirty-ass job. Need to add some baby wipes to the tool kit, much preferable to using a stream of my own urine like I had to today. "Adapt, improvise, overcome."



This whole process took about an hour and 20 minutes, but I was taking my time because I didn't want to pinch the tube or something and then wait for my wife to get off work to bring me another one. Rode 15 more miles back home with no problems. By the way, thanks for the inner tube, Mark: it's the one I used.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This is a shot of the piles of sand they had to clear from the road going in to Big Lake. It was deposited there by the Missouri River this Summer. If any of you guys read about the Missouri State Trooper Water Patrolman who disappeared into the flood waters, that happened near here. They found his K-9 companion dog's body the next day, but they're still looking for him. Bad deal.



My jacket in the aftermath of the tire change. I should really find something else to carry to use for this purpose.



My vanquished foe before I departed the parking lot. Sorry, it's a little blurry. It still strikes me how this flat could have been really bad before or after the spot on my travels where it occurred. I'll continue to think that old woman driving so slow pulled out in front of me for a reason.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Dude nice job… You made it look easy… I have more trouble that that just wiping and flushing
Thanks, Crazy Jake. I got lucky with the nice day, plenty of time and the perfect spot to do it. Whenever I change tires, I do it exactly like this, with the Quick-Jack and tools I carry on the KLR. That way, when I have to do it somewhere I'd really rather not, it's familiar territory for me.

Of course, it's a lot easier when you just break one side of the tire loose and put a new inner tube in.

Had this happened 5 miles further down the road on the shoulder of the Interstate, or in the grass near it, it would have really sucked. I had shit scattered everywhere and it was all easy to find on the concrete when I was done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Looks like you were well prepared (minus the BB wipes). Any words of wisdom on getting the valve stem back through the rim? Always seems to be a pita for me. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Ah the things that turn a ride into and adventure,....

Boy that picture of the tube was a surprise. I've got 2 tubes sitting on a bench at my shop. I've only been bringing patches with me, not anymore. I would sure be bummed finding a tear like that after pulling everything apart with only patches as my way out.

The piles of sand are crazy. Any other pictures of what the flood left behind? I'd be interested in taking a look.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Looks like you were well prepared (minus the BB wipes). Any words of wisdom on getting the valve stem back through the rim? Always seems to be a pita for me. :)
I use one of those valve stem fishing tools. They're pretty handy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Ah the things that turn a ride into and adventure,....

Boy that picture of the tube was a surprise. I've got 2 tubes sitting on a bench at my shop. I've only been bringing patches with me, not anymore. I would sure be bummed finding a tear like that after pulling everything apart with only patches as my way out.

The piles of sand are crazy. Any other pictures of what the flood left behind? I'd be interested in taking a look.
The pictures really don't do it justice. All the structures are still there, but unless people had enough sense to put them up on 10-foot foundations, after sitting in 7 feet of water for almost three months, they're all wasted. It will be cheaper just to demolish and rebuild rather than fix them. There wasn't much of a flow to the water in this area: the buildings just all got saturated. In other areas where there was a current, steel grain bins crumpled like pop cans and there are now 50-foot deep ponds that weren't there before.

This used to be a kind of restaurant across the road from the state park where people went to get fast food, ice cream, etc. People used to hang out and drink in party in that elevated boat cabin thing.



I kept looking around for Neil Armstrong and lunar lander. It's like a moonscape out there.



This is supposed to be brown and green, not gray. All the farmers got about two feet of sand deposited into their fields. What they'll do about it, I don't know. Doubt any of them will plant next year.



Here are some of the lakeside structures/cabins.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,928 Posts
Looks like you were well prepared (minus the BB wipes). Any words of wisdom on getting the valve stem back through the rim? Always seems to be a pita for me. :)
Throw a couple of pairs of the mechanics latex gloves in your kit.

Here's what I do with the valve stem:

Insert the partially inflated tube into the tire. Stand the tire vertical with the valve at the bottom. Set the rim down on the stem and thread the nut on a couple of turns. May need to pull the tube up out of the tire a bit to get the valve stem through the hole. Work one side of the tire on part of the way while it's vertical (enough to hold the tire on the rim when you flip it horizontal).
 

·
Missed Gear
Joined
·
1,193 Posts
Great story, and spooky too. Nice for Halloween. :animal0010:

Looks like you were prepared.

Question about the tube. Was it pre-talc'd or did you have some powder in your kit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Nice job buddy! you are prepaired............and well documented....



WOW! the pics are something else, how devastating.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Throw a couple of pairs of the mechanics latex gloves in your kit.

Here's what I do with the valve stem:

Insert the partially inflated tube into the tire. Stand the tire vertical with the valve at the bottom. Set the rim down on the stem and thread the nut on a couple of turns. May need to pull the tube up out of the tire a bit to get the valve stem through the hole. Work one side of the tire on part of the way while it's vertical (enough to hold the tire on the rim when you flip it horizontal).
Dirty hands are no big deal, but I'd rather not have them. Good idea on the latex gloves. I use them all the time at work and always have a box around. Don't know why I didn't think of them.

I knew somebody on here had a technique for getting the valve stem through the hole without any help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Great story, and spooky too. Nice for Halloween. :animal0010:

Looks like you were prepared.

Question about the tube. Was it pre-talc'd or did you have some powder in your kit?
I put talc in the Ziploc bags I use to carry the tubes to prevent them from rubbing, but when I took them out, it was all just at the bottom of the Ziploc.

I carry a little Tupperware tub thing I stole out of our kitchen cabinet to carry extra talc. Glad I had it because it came in handy for lubing the tube and the tire bead: much easier than carrying some kind of liquid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Nice job buddy! you are prepaired............and well documented....



WOW! the pics are something else, how devastating.
It was kind of cool having the camera along: I don't always carry one. To most this would be a pita, but since I bought the stuff to do it, the means to carry the stuff, and practiced doing it, it was actually kind of enjoyable since I had the good conditions.

It just felt good to be able to deal with it and continue on with my ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Thanks for telling the tale(great pics). I don't generally believe in coincidences. If they are what governs; my life has been spared co-incedently a bunch of times! Glad you got to use the tube, oh and always remember urine is sterile!:) but I agree with Spec, I have a few gloves in my tool kit and First aid kit.

Best,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Any opinions from any tire-repair gurus about whether I should even bother with the nail hole in the tire itself?

I guess it would be no big deal to break it back down this Winter, but I'm wondering if it's necessary. I would imagine the hole the nail left in the tire has pretty much closed back up to where I won't even be able to find it and it's not like the tube is going to squeeze out through it. Can't plug it on the side of the knob like that, so all I would be able to do is put some kind of surface patch on the inside of the tire and I don't really see what good that would do considering the size of any "hole" that might remain in the tire.

Might throw a piece of chalk in my repair kit so if this happens again, I can at least put a mark on the sidewall near the damage that will last until I get home and give me a reference point for finding it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,509 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for telling the tale(great pics). I don't generally believe in coincidences. If they are what governs; my life has been spared co-incedently a bunch of times! Glad you got to use the tube, oh and always remember urine is sterile!:) but I agree with Spec, I have a few gloves in my tool kit and First aid kit.

Best,
I tend to agree. I've had more than my share of close calls that just can't be chalked up to coincidence.

When I was six or so, I was asleep in the back seat of the car (in those days, lying down with no seat belt on, of course) when my Dad ran a stop sign and got t-boned by a dump truck. It ripped the entire trunk off the car and the gas tank was found over 75 yards away on the side of a hill. The whole back of the car was gone, literally from the rear seat on back.

Just a few milliseconds of timing and I wouldn't be here. A few milliseconds and all three of us would have been killed.

The list goes on and on. Either I live a charmed life or somebody or something is watching out for me. This flat tire wasn't nearly as extreme as some of my other close calls, but kind of fits into that category.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top