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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ever wonder what the rotor markings other than the "Lazy T" were for*?



Tom

*Rhetorical question; I'm just playing around with transparency layers in Paint.net..
 

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I'd a thought center of keyway would have been TDC, but Edge of keyway is probably more accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I guess that's what they intended. I'm pulling mine in a couple of days and intend to look at that. This was a picture I pulled off of the internet, not mine. I'm going to see if a straight edge laid across the center-line will line up perfectly.

edit: I guess I should probably set it up on the surface plate and check it with the height gauge to be more accurate. Geez, that's more work than I signed up for when I woke up this morning...

Tom
 
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Yes that is the only way I have heard of also.
We can elongate the holes to see if we can get enough, but does it really make a big enough difference to worry about...that I do not know...?:character00201:
 

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Yes that is the only way I have heard of also.
We can elongate the holes to see if we can get enough, but does it really make a big enough difference to worry about...that I do not know...?:character00201:
With less than 37HP stock - 50HP "Built to the Hilt", I'll suggest, It Ain't Worth Messing With!

Tighten those trigger coil/pick-up coil/cps sensor screws Which You Did Apply some Loc-Tite Blue to, and Forget Them! Just my opinion.
 
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I have not posted any truly useless information in a while; let this suffice.





Them Kawasakians is purty good at machinin' when they wants ta be.

The TDC mark on the rim of the rotor is keyed to the edge of the slot on the crankshaft...

Tom
 

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Looks like them lines are even a degree or two out of line!

Even more reason for Willys to make more Degreeable sprockets!
But one should use a piston stop and properly mark / remark TDC.
 
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
In the top photo? That's parallax error from the camera angle. I drew the red line to show that the TDC mark was set right at the horizontal center-line, then scribed the mark on the hub.

I'd take a better picture for you, square on to the rotor, but I tore down the set up and installed the rotor. As an old-timey machined parts inspector, take my word for it.

Kawaski's marking is dead nuts. Not to say that the slot on the crank can't be misplaced, but I checked mine and it's correct. On my motor they did well with this.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Since you're a good looking guy with a groovy personality (and I hadn't torqued the rotor yet) I got a better picture for ya.



That's as square-on as I can get the camera in the Shop of Horrors. The diameter of the rotor is 5.870"; the T is set at 2.890".

Tom
 

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What usless crap Tom....lol....all that time wasted to prove what...???


Oooooops, did i say that out loud....???


SERIOUSLY....Great work!......but i never took the markings as my TDC etc etc I always worked from piston at top dead centre.....I even at one point used an indicator to make 100% sure......that was when i went after the timing seriously....and as the previous post said 34-50 isn't worth all of this work.......50 is a good round number and I'd be very surprised if someone were to get much above it without serious hogging and did the stroking, etc etc......but enjoyed the pics.

As for the degreed sprockets, I couldn't tell easily between 4 or 5 degree advance when playing around with them, so it would need to be dyno'd to get it spot on and that would mean all the rest must be perfect too first...then get at the timed sprockets. The best person to do this is someone who has a dyno at their disposal and wants the business to make these degreed sprockets and he isn't that interested imho. The amount of GEN I machines is dwindling quickly I'm afraid. Plus, if you are serious about HP then you would buy the reground cams and go full hog so to speak imho...which is what I have done. But for less than $100 you do get a little bump from setting the advance to 5 degrees....just saying. Compared to what $350 or somewhere close for a set of cams with the advance already machined into them. When i was speaking with the person who designed the cams for Mega Cycle way back he said they were given the advance by their engineering team etc Can't remember enough to say anything concrete, it's been a long time and no-one is talking seriously about it so i forget quickly when things go quiet on a subject.:character00201:
 

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Ok Tom I will take your photographic evidence as proof-positive that the Flywheel rotor TDC mark is 'dead-on' with the flywheel keyway. (You are braver than I, to be messing with 135 ft. lbs. of torque with a loose cam chain. We've both seen photographic evidence of what can go wrong!) I'm glad that it was not yet torqued!

But it will still take an Assembled engine and a piston stop to confirm that Kawasaki machined the keyway into the crank journal with the same degree of accuracy.

You semi-retired guys seem to have all kinds of time to waste on useless information gathering.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
...You semi-retired guys seem to have all kinds of time to waste on useless information gathering.
Of all the useless information I've come up with, this is probably the most useless. But then, that's sorta what this thread was about.

It was fun, though.

Tom
 
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
...(You are braver than I, to be messing with 135 ft. lbs. of torque with a loose cam chain. We've both seen photographic evidence of what can go wrong!)...
If you proceed with caution, using two hands to keep the chain from bunching up as you rotate the crank into the right position for the tool with your other hand, it ain't too bad.

Once everything is in place, tie the chain up and don't let anything slip as you torque. Helps to hold your tongue just so, too.

All of the above was why I hadn't gotten around to torquing it yet ;^).

Tom
 
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