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I've been trying to break the bead on this Shinko 705 rear tire for two hours now. I've used multiple spoons, half a bottle of dish soap, a C clamp and as much force as I can muster but that bead won't break. I'm going to take it to the tire shop and have them put it on the machine. The original tire that came on my KLR was very easy to remove. A little bit of soap and then I stepped on it...came right off.

Is it normal for these Shinkos to be so difficult to break loose? If so, I need to think about getting a different brand/tire because I can't see going on a long distance trip and then expecting to change a tire.

I'm guessing that it might have something to do with the Shinko 705 being a tubeless tire. None the less, it's unacceptable for anyone who wants to change their own tire to have to fight with something for so long.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Finally got it off. Ended up having to cut the tire at the bead and then pry it away from the rim....both sides. Anyone in the Houston area want to buy a new Shinko 705? I'm going back with OEM.
 

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The Shinko is a fairly well-respected tire. Quite a few tires are known to be difficult to remove due to a stiff sidewall.

[rant]
Often a tire will get stuck on the rim, perhaps due to the wrong lubricant being used to install it. Many folks insist on using Windex, WD-40, dish detergent, boogers, and all sorts of other 'lubricants'. This in spite of the automotive aftermarket industry making proper tire lubricants such as Ru-Glyde (which stands for something complicated like Rubber Glyde). Rather than spending the same amount of money that a gallon of oil costs and having enough of the slippery shit to pass around the neighborhood for several lifetimes, people insist on using what are essentially corrosive chemicals (detergents contain phosphates that aren't nice to aluminum, Windex is basically watered down ammonia, WD-40 is a light petroleum oil, boogers, erm, I'll stop there. Do any of those things sound like a good thing to put on rubber or aluminum?). Perhaps yours was stuck on for that reason.
[rant/]

My rant notwithstanding, I think going back to OEM would be a mistake. They are far more expensive than necessary and don't last for shit. Get a proper tire lubricant and put the Shinko on. If you are really put off of the Shinko, then a Kenda of the K761 sort might be a good choice. K761s can be had for $100 a pair delivered to your door, work well enough in all conditions for most folks, and the rear will go at least 9K miles, the front three times that (though I'm usually ashamed after 18K miles and put a new one on).

Anything but the OEM Dunlop.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Got this on amazon and works a champ.


I bet it works wonderfully and I'd like to have one as well as a tire changing stand. What I try to do is use the tools that I would be carrying with me on a long ride and unfortunately I don't have room for that on my KLR.

The Shinko is a good tire for the price and I have been happy with it. My only issue is the difficulty in breaking the bead during removal. I go out to West Texas often and there isn't much shade out there and fighting with a tire isn't a win/win. Part of the reason I decided on the KLR was the ability to fix things out on the trail. After this set of Shinkos I'm going back to stock tires for the simple reason of them being easy to change. Sure you have to take price, value, longevity and handling into consideration but that's not everything. The ability to conduct field repairs is important to me. When buzzards start circling above you then you know you're taking way too long :)
 

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1) I have a tool like Patroy shows (mounted on a stand) but I managed for 40 years without one. At various times I've used dead blow mallets, hammers, MX boots, etc. Never had a bead I couldn't get off. I always spray some WD on the bead first......which brings me to:

2) In a rare occurance, I will disagree with my esteemed collegue, Tom......there have been lengthy debates almost everywhere on tire lube including an extensive one on ADVrider. I've used WD40 for a few decades now only because that's what all the other racers were using and because Ive had no issues with slippage or corrosion. There were several MC shop mechanics that stated they've used WD40 to mount tires for 20-30 years. While it may not seem logical, I'd suggest this is one of those "the proof is in the pudding" things. I guess its the same basic argument people have about using WD in lieu of chain lube...

3) having the bead stuck may be a pain for a tire change but it's a good thing when you're riding so....

YMMV

Dave
 

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@DPelletier, I would have to push back on that. I have been using Ru-Glyde for years and have never had slippage, corrosion, difficulty breaking a bead, or tires that smelled like fish. ;^)

And to the OP, there are many tires that are as easy to dismount as the OEM tire and which will out-perform it in every category. The Kenda K761 is only one of them.
 
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@DPelletier, I would have to push back on that. I have been using Ru-Glyde for years and have never had slippage, corrosion, difficulty breaking a bead, or tires that smelled like fish. ;^)

And to the OP, there are many tires that are as easy to dismount as the OEM tire and which will out-perform it in every category. The Kenda K761 is only one of them.
I never said Ru-Glyde wasn't good, only that WD40 works well. If this is the only thing we disagree on, I'm happy. .......oh wait, I would never have removed my starter, either! >:):grin2:

I agree on your tire comment. (see, I can be reasonable!) LOL

Cheers,

Dave
 

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I replaced a Shinko 705 rear tire just a few weeks ago. I struggled for 30 minutes using all kinds of methods without luck. It wasn't until I turned over the tire spoon, that I could slip it far enough down between tire and rim and leverage/push the bead over the safety bump. Using the same technique, it just took seconds to do it on the other side. Before I got started, I did go for a short ride to warm up the tire, and I used tire lube.

I am fairly optimistic I could do it on the side of the road.
 

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...oh wait, I would never have removed my starter, either! >:):grin2:...
Well, I put it back! (see, I can be reasonable!)

I think most racers and mechanics look for expediency, less crap in the toolbox, race-day performance, convenience, etc. I get that. I'm only saying that as home mechanics we can easily afford to have the right product at hand for a given job. We don't do tires/day, we do tires/year.

I'm not saying WD-40 is necessarily bad as a tire lubricant, but that a tire lubricant is better as a tire lubricant than WD-40 is.

And WD-40 smells like fish. Or is it coconuts?
 

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Well, I put it back! (see, I can be reasonable!)

I think most racers and mechanics look for expediency, less crap in the toolbox, race-day performance, convenience, etc. I get that. I'm only saying that as home mechanics we can easily afford to have the right product at hand for a given job. We don't do tires/day, we do tires/year.

I'm not saying WD-40 is necessarily bad as a tire lubricant, but that a tire lubricant is better as a tire lubricant than WD-40 is.

And WD-40 smells like fish. Or is it coconuts?
....I did three on Saturday.....>:) OK, I'm just "in a mood" as my wife would say. :grin2:

...I think fish smell like WD40! :wink2:


Cheers,
Dave
 

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....I did three on Saturday....
That reminds me! I have finally gotten the stuff I need to make my tire changer fully functional. Mojo blocks and Mojo lever. I have to R&R a couple of sets of tires just to see how well it works.
 
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I've been trying to break the bead on this Shinko 705 rear tire for two hours now. I've used multiple spoons, half a bottle of dish soap, a C clamp and as much force as I can muster but that bead won't break. I'm going to take it to the tire shop and have them put it on the machine. The original tire that came on my KLR was very easy to remove. A little bit of soap and then I stepped on it...came right off.

Is it normal for these Shinkos to be so difficult to break loose? If so, I need to think about getting a different brand/tire because I can't see going on a long distance trip and then expecting to change a tire.

I'm guessing that it might have something to do with the Shinko 705 being a tubeless tire. None the less, it's unacceptable for anyone who wants to change their own tire to have to fight with something for so long.
Is it too Late to suggest that you might Trade the TUBELESS Shinko 705 130/80 - 17 for the TUBE TYPE Shinko 705 130/90 - 17? It is a fair bit taller.

The KLR650 rear wheel does have the tubeless style safety lip of a tubeless type wheel which is great from a safety aspect, when used with a tubeless capable tire. But can be a bear for manual tire changing.

The Tube Type tire does not have near as tight fitting beads as the Tubeless model.
 

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Interesting off subject comment... I once saw some guys spraying their minnows with wd40 when crappie fishing ....I never realized it smelled like fish.. maybe that is why it worked...
 

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I bought a gallon of RuGlyde before I bought my NoMar changer. RuGlyde works well, but the lube that NoMar sells works even better. And after using the NoMar changer for a few years, I will never go back to tire irons. Then again, the tires on my BMW LT are FAR, FAR harder to change than any KLR tire.
 

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Is it too Late to suggest that you might Trade the TUBELESS Shinko 705 130/80 - 17 for the TUBE TYPE Shinko 705 130/90 - 17? It is a fair bit taller.
According to the Google's, it would appear that running that taller tire would help counteract that 10% offset we all know and hate on the speedometer. Based on my calculations, it would take an indicated speed of 80 mph (actual of 72, assuming 10%) and turn it into an actual of about 75 or 76.

Interesting thought, and particularly useful given I'm getting ready to replace my tires soon. Any idea if this extra height causes rubbing?
 

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Hi. I work for Michelin’s commercial division and WD-40 is one of the least things you want on your tires or tubes. Rubber and petroleum don’t play nice with one another. As an example, if you have an old tube laying around that will hold some air, grab a pin or something sharp. Make a small hole. Mark it. Inflate your tube to the point where you can just see the hole with air escaping. Now spray some WD-40 on the hole. Now watch the hole get real big. Petroleum eats rubber.
Similar to a commercial grade tire lube can be found at your local grocery store in the cleaner isle, for floors or the area where wood floor polished and cleaners are at. Look for Murphy’s soap. The difference is that regular detergents have sulfates and it will actually make your tires stick when installing (that’s that squeaky noise you hear when you're washing your car. Murphy’s is a lubricant made from plants and installation will go easier. Just don’t use too much or your tire can walk on the rim during install. If this happens, get some locking pliers and some heavy cardboard. Fold the cardboard on the front and back of the rim and snugly lock your pliers. Not too tight. Your tire bead will sit below the pliers and this will act as a bead keeper so the tire won’t walk.
 

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According to the Google's, it would appear that running that taller tire would help counteract that 10% offset we all know and hate on the speedometer. Based on my calculations, it would take an indicated speed of 80 mph (actual of 72, assuming 10%) and turn it into an actual of about 75 or 76.

Interesting thought, and particularly useful given I'm getting ready to replace my tires soon. Any idea if this extra height causes rubbing?
The Tube Type 130/90-17 rear tire will have 'Zero' affect on Speedometer error on many motorcycles, because many motorcycles have a Front Wheel driven speedometer. Including the KLR.
 
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