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So I started the install on my rear shock spring I recently purchased. I went with the 7.4 kg spring from top gun. Heres the link for more info.
http://www.topgunmotorcycles.com/KLR_springs/klrsprings.html
The spring ran me about $80 and $20 shipping. You can call up the number on the sight and speak with someone about which spring is best for you.

Here is mine shortly after unpackaging it.

Here is the beginning of the disassembly faze. Just used a block of 2x4 under the kick stand and a car jack under the skid plate to life the rear end off the ground. This would be easier if i had a flat jack, but since I don't this does just fine.

Next your going to have to remove the rear wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #2

Next the dog bones are going to have to be removed. As seen here.

Here are the vacated holes of where the links used to be.

Next the lower shock mount bolt will need to be removed. It is the center bolt from the previous photo.

There it is. All three bolts on the shock linkage are out at this time.
 

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So next is one of 2 options. If your going to be removing the swingarm. Which I recommend as they often corrode up and get froze in there. Then that is your next step. Highly reccomend getting some pb blaster of your favorite form of penetrant lube. I am going to for go removing the swingarm for now since mine is stuck and i am short one hammer and the lube needed.

The black hose in front of the top shock mount bolt will be needed to be bent out of the way to access the bolt.

Now go ahead and remove the too shock mount bolt.

At this point the shock will slide rearward. Make sure it does not fall out and get damaged. If the swing arm is off the removal will be easier. If not just lift up on the swingarm a bit and use the other hand to slide the shock out.

You should be left the a vacated spot where the shock used to be at this point. If you were going to be just replacing the entire shock then nows the time. Just reverse the steps and your done. Since I am going to be switching out just the spring i still have some work to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4

Here is the grimy and dirty stock klr shock. This will be brought to work with me tomorrow and springs swapped there since i have the use of a shock spring compressor I am going to take advantage of it.

Here is the swingarm nut broken loose. I have used some cleaner to try and remove some of the grime left behind by chain lube and general crap picked up on the road. But unfortunately for me I have a seized shaft and since no stores are open I will have to wait till tomorrow to remove the swingarm and grease the shaft and bearings.

This thing is going to need some persuasion to be removed so I will wait till tomorrow and get the right stuff rather than risk breaking something. Will post more tomorrow on the spring swap and more on the swingarm removal as well. So until tomorrow folks.
 

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So I got to work today and the spring install went way easier than anticipated. Took only about 20 mins.

So I'm lucky and had on hand an ohlins spring compressor.

First step is to set the shock up I'm the compressor so that the bottom is facing upwards.

Next start to compress the shock spring so that the collar is able to be removed.

You may need to use something to pry up on the collar.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

Next slide the collar off of the bottom of the shock leaving the black plastic piece in place.

Next slide the black protector out.

Now the spring needs to be relaxed slowly so that it will slide up and off of the shock.

Now the shock and spring will be separated along with the collar and black sleeve.
 

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Discussion Starter #7

Next get your new spring ready to be installed.

Slide the new spring on the shock and mount back in the compressor.

Now your going to compress the spring enough to be able to slide the black sleeve in place.

Once the sleeve is in place make sure you have enough room to get the collar slid back onto the shock.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

Once the collar is in place where it needs to be the spring can be slowly relaxed so that it comes and rests back in it's place on the collar.

Once it is happy and in it's correct place just release all tension on the spring and remove it from the compressor. Don't make the mistake I did and not line up my mounting holes. This is not a fun or easy task once spring is already installed.

Once finished the shock should look like this. The mounting holes are aligned so the shock will mount up easy. Now it is ready to be put back in the bike. While the shock is out I tool some time to give it a good cleaning and also found it a convenient time to adjust my damping settings. When I get off work I will be heading home for the reinstallation of the shock and some anger management training on my swingarm pivot shaft. Got some penetrant lube and a bigger hammer. So hopefully all goes well and I will be riding tonight.
 

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Excellent writeup with photos here. I appreciate you going to the trouble of chronicling all this work and I'm sure a lot of others do, too.

Good luck with the swingarm project: will be looking forward to seeing how the rest of that went for you.

I'm going to do the same thing next Winter and this is a great resource you've provided.

Obviously, a spring compressor is needed. I was considering just sending my whole shock to Topgun and letting them do it, but after your writeup, I'll probably just try to find somebody in town who has a compressor and do it myself. My cousin's kid has an auto shop in town and he'd probably let me use his.

Thanks again. Great writeup; great photos.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's no problem. I know you said you would like it put up here in one of the other threads so if I'm doing the project anyway might as well document it and help out others who possibly are looking into doing a spring swap. After doing it I would say a spring compressor is most definitely needed. The spring is under so much tension you stand a better chance of hurting yourself rather than completing the job. I know top gun does the install for free if you buy a spring through them. But that would require the bike being down for a couple weeks and a little bit extra money involved for shipping. If it's winter and you can part with the bike for that period of time then that's a good option. As its middle of summer right now and my Klr is my only mode of transportation that's not an option for me. Needs to only be a weekend project. Either way I'll get it done. I'll post more tonight...
 

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Thank you for this thread. Good job on everything.

I would suggest you have a M14 die on hand to tidy up the swing arm bolt threads, should you need to persuade them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well back again to finish this thing up. I wish I could say I'm returning triumphant, king amongst men and all that but the swingarm bolt got the better of me. It started to mushroom and I cut my losses before I did some real damage. I got tons of advice on how to get it out so i will save all that up for another day and time. But let this serve as a reminder to all... Grease your swingarm bolt! Don't let it go unnoticed. Or you like me will be fighting it forever. Here is about the time I realized I was beat...

No damage done, that's what crash protection is for. Lesson learned. And on we go.
 

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Discussion Starter #13

Before pulling out the swingarm bolt your going to need to remove your rear brake spring so that it does not get damaged.

It will look like this.

So for the sake of this thread let's say you got your swingarm off. Check the bearings for any dull and flat spots. If all is well grease it up and reinstall. Get the bolt slid back into place making sure everything stays in place.

Now your going to tighten the swingarm bolt. Torque is 88Nm or 65ft lb. Whichever you choose.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Now that this swingarm is back in place it's time to slide the shock back into place. Pull up slightly on the swingarm and it should slide in nicely. Now get the top shock mount bolt ready to be installed. Clean the threads and if you so choose apply a dab of the thread locker of your choice.

Once the bolt it started tighten it up and torque to 59 Nm/ 44ftlb.

Replace the black hose and clip back onto the bottom of the air box.

Once the top is tight you can get the bottom ready. Clean the bolts and the bolt holes of all old grease and dirt that may have gotten in there. I started with the bottom shock mount bolt. Apply a generous amount of fresh waterproof grease to the smooth portion of the bolt and slide it into place. Next clean up the two dog bone bolts and the dog bones themselves if you so choose. Again apply grease to the bolts. I started with the forward most bolt and got that in place and then the swingarm can be maneuvered to get the rearward dog bone bolt in place. Now that all the bolts are in place and dog bones are in order clean up the threads of the bolts that are sticking out. Again apply thread lock if you so choose. Torque on all three nuts is 98Nm or 72ft lb.
 

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That should wrap up the shock installation. Next up will be the reinstallation of the rear wheel which most everyone should be pretty familiar with. First off clean up the axel and wheel of all old grease and dirt. Grease up the axel with the left side collar/chain adjuster plate in place already. Get the wheel in place, slide the chain onto the rear sprocket, line up the rear brake caliper, then lift up on the rear wheel and slide the axel into place making sure that all spacers stay in position. Sounds much easier than it is but if you made it this far I have confidence in you. Now that it's all in place and looks correct get the right side collar/plate and washer slid on and ready for the rear axel bolt. Clean up the threads and make sure the holes for the cotter pin cleaned out. Put the nut on but just hand tight. Next comes getting the rear wheel straight and chain properly tensioned. There are marks on the swingarm to use as starting marks but I would measure from rear axel center to some consistet point on both sides of the bike. This ensures that the wheel is straight. Chain tension is debatable and everyone has their own oppinion and I will not tell you what's right and wrong. My opinion is that I would rather have a loose chain than a tight one. So I set mine a little looser than some but whatever makes you happy. Once your happy with all that it's time to lock down the rear axel nut. I use a screwdriver in-between the chain and sprocket and roll the wheel to get the chain nice and pressed up against the adjutsers. Torque the nut to 98Nm 72ft lb. Remove the screwdriver if used and double check your chain for slack and ensure it's straight. If it's to your liking then install a cotter pin. If the holes do not line up I prefer to slightly loosen the nut to get a hole that lines up rather than over torque the nut.

Put the cotter pin in and bent over the 2 ends to lock it into place. Now is also a good time to pump up the rear brake to ensure the pads are seated. Nothing is more unnerving than to go out on a ride after working on it and to expect there to be brakes and there is nothing since there were not pumped up.

Now you should be looking at a pretty finished project. If all is well you should be ready to go. I prefer to go and double check all work preformed. Make sure all the nuts and bolts are in place and tight. If you so desire now would also be a good time to clean and lube your chain. Now it's time to go enjoy your new shock. I only went on a quick ride with mine but man its like night and day difference. Way better now.
I hope you found this helpful. If anyone has any questions about what was done here or feels like a missed something in this write up please jump in and put it up here.
 

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Aron31 -

Nicely done!

I've added your write-up to the "Common Mods and Issues" post.

T
 

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Dredging up.....I used the Eibach 0900.225.0500 spring instead of this one (500lbs rate). Tad cheaper. I'm 6'2", 260 pounds. On preload #1 its perfect for me, allowing plenty of preload left for gear or two-up. There are other spring rates. Just change the "0500" for whatever poundage you need, in 50lb increments.
 

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Dredging up.....I used the Eibach 0900.225.0500 spring instead of this one (500lbs rate). Tad cheaper. I'm 6'2", 260 pounds. On preload #1 its perfect for me, allowing plenty of preload left for gear or two-up. There are other spring rates. Just change the "0500" for whatever poundage you need, in 50lb increments.
great! thanks for this, i was looking at the one the OP had provided a link to, and i was thinking 350lbs is not very much when yon consider gear or passenger. any links as to where you purchased?

cheers!
 

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Just search the model number for the best price. I think mine came from Summit Racing.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 
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