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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. I am new to the site because of my recent interest in purchasing a KLR for a rtw trip I have in the works. I have the opportunity to purchase a 1993 Barbie model with 11910 miles on it because buddy of mine collects and wanted to hook me up with one for 1500ish. It has the doo mod and runs good so he says. I was wondering if I should pull the trigger? Or should I save up some cash and get a younger gen 1 model with less miles. Thanks so much in advance! Looking forward to being a part of the community.
 

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Maybe, mostly depends on your needs and skills.

If you need a ready to go New York to LA bike, then I'd suggest a late model Gen-2 (2008 or later).

If you're handy with a wrench and don't mind resetting all the maintenance yourself, then a low mileage Gen-1 (2007 or earlier) can be a good deal.

Easier to tell with a few pics. Location also drives pricing, might be cheaper in East Bicycle Road, Arkansas compared to San Francisco metro.

Even with a relatively new bike, resetting the maintenance should be standard procedure. You never know what kind of care and feeding the previous owner invested in his/her scooter.

About a weeks time to go through the bike (assuming you have a decent local bike shop for the parts/pieces):
* adjust the valves,
* clean/replace/re-oil air filter,
* change all fluids (oil & filter change, coolant flush and replace, flush & replace brake fluid)
* replace front brake pads
* may need to replace battery
* lube all cables

Also, tires are likely to need replacement. Even with good tread remaining, you'd have to check the date-code and replace if older than 6-7 years.

I'm a big fan of study and preparation. You may be able to get away without any maintenance, but a broken down scooter in BFE can suck the joy out of bombing around and the free and easy lifestyle.

One benefit of the KLR, parts are generally cheap, and internet forums are nothing short of stellar in terms of rich data, and how-tos. And on this forum, people are quality.
 

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The purchase of a bike seems a SMALL segment of a 'round-the-world budget, IMHO. The most reliable bike (preferably repairable in your own hands) you can find deserves a priority position on your wish list.

Unless . . . riding around the world on a 27-28 year old bike fulfills an objective/goal of yours.

DISCLAIMER: Opinion only above; do what you gotta do.
 

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I personally appreciate the cam chain guide slipper in the valve cover of the 87-95 Gen 1 models so much more than the steel bridge used in the 1996-2018 models, everytime I service a KLR650 valve train.

Who of us give a flip if the steel bridge cam chain guide is 1/2 a dba quieter at 50 feet.

I'll vote for the low mile 1993, with Doo Done. Just remember it still needs to be allowed to adjust once every 5 - 7.5k miles. And Valve tappet inspect/adjust every 10k.

Oh, have you read this yet? https://www.klrforum.com/introductions/58921-dpelletiers-common-new-klr-owner-mistakes-avoid.html
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your inputs! I am wrench capable and enjoy working on a bike and making it my own. I was thinking if anything, getting this model would be a good intro into getting to know a KLR. I have been avidly shopping and haven't been able to find one at a better deal. So once I know and learn I could get one better suited? I attached a few pictures (bad) of it stored in the corner of their garage.
 

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There are 3 possibilities to purchase new side panels. Hemisphere Off-Road, Polisport, Maier Plastics.

That is not really the 'Barbie model'. It is way better than the 'Barbie models', imo!
 

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If it seems to run good, I'd buy that. Some period piece plastics and decals are very difficult to come by, but electrics/wiring and mechanicals are easily obtained.

Keep us posted. We always enjoy peeking over your shoulder as you wrench and rider. The crew will be kibbitzing about choices in tires, and brake upgrades and battery and carb/air filter mods and ...
 

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the age and mileage aren't things that would concern me and there is no reason that a well maintained Gen1 can't be considered one of the most reliable, long-lived dual purpose bikes in the world. At that price it would be hard to go wrong.

Dave
 
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