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2022 KLR 650 Adventure
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ricochet Off-road has a skid plate available for the 2022 KLR Adventure. Just a heads up.
 

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The 15 post requirement for posting photos and including links went away when the forum was changed to XenForo software.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Speaking of skid plates, I still have the factory plastic one on my 1998. I know there are a handful of different ones available from aftermarket. Is there a clear better choice, or pretty much the same function and quality?
 

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I'll bet that That Ricochet skid plate is THE Same Old Skid Plate that fit the 1987-2018 bikes with the same old problems.

Three inches too short at the rear, no scallop to allow doo-hickey adjustment access. potentially not quite long enough u-bolt slots at the front.

But they are still a pretty good skid plate.

If one looks at the pics on their web-site, they show a skid plate for some other brand/model that has an extended & stepped rear section.
Why don't they 'Improve' their KLR650 Skid Plate???
Maybe because WE haven't suggested or insisted on improvement?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I ordered it. Guess I'll just have to order a better one later.
 

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Unfortunately, all skid plates are designed and made by people who have never ridden a motorcycle, never intend to ride a motorcycle, don't have any acquaintances who ride motorcycles, can't hire anyone who does ride a motorcycle as a consultant, think that motorcycles are ridden on the road, and wonder what the skid plate is for. It's like buying forks from people who eat with sticks.

As Paul points out, the Ricochet doesn't provide full coverage. The lack of a cut-out for the balancer adjustment doesn't bother me because I have an 8mm swivel head socket. Still, it is a shortcoming.

What bothers me more is that skid plate designers and makers think that there has to be a big hole in the bottom of the skid plate so that you can access the drain plug. I dunno about anyone else, but I've never needed to change my oil more than once a month and lately it's more like once a year. To R&R the skid plate takes me less than ten minutes. I don't need a big hole in the skid plate where an errant stick can punch up through the bottom of the crankcase. Or a rock. Or whatever.

To be candid, I have always had the Ricochet and have ridden over some pretty gnarly granite chunks, outcroppings, and rock piles and have not suffered any case damage. Whether that is a matter of luck or great skill I cannot sa... OK, I've been lucky. And now that my days of riding over really rough stuff are probably behind me I won't worry about it much anymore.

I just jinxed myself.
 

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Unfortunately, all skid plates are designed and made by people who have never ridden a motorcycle, [...], think that motorcycles are ridden on the road, and wonder what the skid plate is for.

[...] And now that my days of riding over really rough stuff are probably behind me I won't worry about it much anymore.

I just jinxed myself.
So.. about roads.. I live in Florida personally, there's one road that acts as a main-cut through from one part of the town to the other.. that road has 5 speed bumps. Now.. while the KLR is an ADV bike, with some knobby tires on it.. I'd prefer to not just jump into possibly wet grass 5 times, then try and get out back onto the asphalt 5 times.. that's just 10 chances of me being stupid.. so, I'd prefer to just say [censored] it and drive over the 5 speed bumps on a 30mph road.. because Florida is juuussst lovely., Would a skid plate keep me safe if I don't go down to the 5mph not-speedLimit like some clowns do when going over speedbumps?? (Sincerely fellow drivers.. those black and white signs are the law signs, those yellow and black signs are the caution signs, not stop signs, not speed limit signs, sincerely, please take some caution and be safe while going over a speed bump.. BUT DON'T STOP FOR THEM! YOU ARE LITERALLY STOPPING IN THE ROAD WHERE MOVING TRAFFIC IS MEANT TO BE!)

With the mini-rant out of the way, down here in Florida I deal with a 30mph road with 5 speed bumps even though the road is in a straight line and level elevation, so I prefer to do 20-25 over those bumps, would a skid plate help in the event of me scraping the bottom of the bike on a speed bump or another example: coming off bridges, certain bridges that raise up to get out of the way of sail boats.. the ends of the bridges will have my compact/sedan scrape the main road just due to a sharp and short angle, same question.. Major TL;DR: Will skid plates help with skidding on the road? I know that they may be intended/more useful off-road but uh.. they have to offer some amount of [useful] protection for commuters too right?
 

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So.. about roads.. I live in Florida personally, there's one road that acts as a main-cut through from one part of the town to the other.. that road has 5 speed bumps. Now.. while the KLR is an ADV bike, with some knobby tires on it.. I'd prefer to not just jump into possibly wet grass 5 times, then try and get out back onto the asphalt 5 times.. that's just 10 chances of me being stupid.. so, I'd prefer to just say [censored] it and drive over the 5 speed bumps on a 30mph road.. because Florida is juuussst lovely., Would a skid plate keep me safe if I don't go down to the 5mph not-speedLimit like some clowns do when going over speedbumps?? (Sincerely fellow drivers.. those black and white signs are the law signs, those yellow and black signs are the caution signs, not stop signs, not speed limit signs, sincerely, please take some caution and be safe while going over a speed bump.. BUT DON'T STOP FOR THEM! YOU ARE LITERALLY STOPPING IN THE ROAD WHERE MOVING TRAFFIC IS MEANT TO BE!)

With the mini-rant out of the way, down here in Florida I deal with a 30mph road with 5 speed bumps even though the road is in a straight line and level elevation, so I prefer to do 20-25 over those bumps, would a skid plate help in the event of me scraping the bottom of the bike on a speed bump or another example: coming off bridges, certain bridges that raise up to get out of the way of sail boats.. the ends of the bridges will have my compact/sedan scrape the main road just due to a sharp and short angle, same question.. Major TL;DR: Will skid plates help with skidding on the road? I know that they may be intended/more useful off-road but uh.. they have to offer some amount of [useful] protection for commuters too right?
I would say crash bars would be more useful in protecting the motorcycle from dumping/forward skidding than a skid plate. In all reality, the skid plate should really be called a bash plate; it protects the bottom of the engine case from things below it coming in a forward direction. Just my opinion.

Really though, if you plan on doing any serious off-roading, I would get both crash bars and a skid plate.
 

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I'll ask are they Bumps or actually Dips for water drainage?

I'll suggest that even a stone-stock KLR650 might take those speed bumps at 50mph without touching a skid plate. Of course, I do not know how tall the bumps might be, but low profile cars Must Be Able to clear them.

I cut donut holes out of old tires or reinforced truck mud flaps or conveyor belting to make rubber spacers to insert between the skid plates & frame tubes to gain more drain plug clearance (3/16 to 1/4 inch helps a bunch) & vibration noise reduction.
Many people install low profile, magnetic tipped oil drain plugs (the TUSK brand have come with a STEEL washer, rather than an aluminum gasket!). And MANY aftermarket drain plugs are POORLY made and if accidentally installed without a thick gasket CAN Split the oil drain boss Wide Open!
 

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I'll ask are they Bumps or actually Dips for water drainage?

I'll suggest that even a stone-stock KLR650 might take those speed bumps at 50mph without touching a skid plate. Of course, I do not know how tall the bumps might be, but low profile cars Must Be Able to clear them.

[...]
Yeah, so, yes, 5 speed bumps on my regular commute, when I do go 45-55 (at absolute most) I have scraped the bottom of my car, it's a (completely stock) 1997 Lexus ES300 for reference. Yes, they are speed bumps, not for drainage, as for the ends of the one bridge I mentioned, it's just a height difference that isn't smoothed out very well, on one side of the bridge it's not bad, but coming from the bridge going to town you can easily bottom out the suspension/scrape due to just the sharp drop-off from bridge to road. (It might have a dual-purpose to have rainwater go off faster, but there's not actual grates for drainage at the end of the bridge)

TL;DR Yes, they bumps, going above 45mph I tend to scrape the '97 Lexus ES300 I drive, I assume due to speed+suspension, at 30mph it won't, so I guess the real question is.. how soft is the KLR650 suspension stock I guess?, Would it bottom out over a speed bump, and if so, does the skid plate offer any protection?
 

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Your not gonna hit the engine on a speed bump!
I don’t care how big it is.
Depends on speed bud, I don't hit a speed bump (technically signs say Speed Hump, so for any road planners/civil engineers who know the difference.. there ya go.) going 20, but boy oh buddy, if I go 50mph I bottom out the suspension or something too fast. What I mean is it's not like going over a log where you go slow and get over it, it's just how soft suspension is, if you drive a car, or ride a motorcycle, with a soft suspension and go over a bump, that bump will knock you and/or bottom out the suspension leading to the chassis hitting the ground.
 

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If you can hit the engine on a speed bump, stock suspension , going as fast as you want and can provide proof .
I will send you $100 cash!
Have you even ridden a KLR?
Bottom out the rear shock maybe, but hit the engine on the ground, NO WAY!
 

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JustWantToAsk,
The 2022 KLR has stiffer suspension than the 2014.5-2018 models, which was stiffer than the 2008-2014 models.

In 14 years of Gen2 KLR650 usage, I've never read of any Florida KLR rider scrubbing their skid plates on Florida city or highway speed Bumps. If it was possible, most all of the other vehicles would be high-centered and the speed bumps would be surrounded by oil slicks.

Set your tire pressures at 32 Front & 30 Rear and Go Ride Your Bike.
 

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I thought it was 22 front and 30 rear.
Ask yourself,
How many factory Owners Manual Writers or even 'KLR Engineers' have actually ridden a KLR650 86,000+ miles over the past 34 years?

The skinny front tire needs at least 2 psi HIGHER air pressure than the Wider rear tire! 80% of the bikes weight & LOAD can be on that skinny front tire when properly braking on a downhill run, even on pavement.
 
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