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Discussion Starter #1
So, I picked up a set of Pirelli MT21s. I had never spooned on a set, picked up a set of tools, watched a coupla differant clips on You Tube, and then executed the task at hand. Only error was somehow I managed to damage the front tube, so I will get a little more practice when I swap it out. I also installed a set of trackside grip heaters, new grips (damn, the stockers were double glued on), and a set of Cyrca hand guards. MTs made riding in the wet on the clay so much more comfortable. Only need a couple more farkles and she will be ready for the "Ride the Hoe" (sponsered by Altrider) the 10-12th of June.

Chet
 

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Good deal! It's nice being able to put on your own tires, isn't it? I'd always had a nearby shop mount tires on my other DS bikes, but now I live out in the middle of nowhere and after getting prices from the closest shop, I decided it was time to learn how to do it myself.

The shop where I bought the bike wanted $90 to change the tires, and that was if I took the wheels off and brought them in. I did mine one at a time, but if I had them both laying in front of me, I could have changed them both in half an hour. So, I figure the shop was basically charging me $180/hour to change tires. After talking to them and hearing "we don't do too many tube-type tires" I figured nobody in that shop had any more experience than I had.

But, in addition to saving money, it's nice to know if I get a flat on the road I can pull over, fix it, and be on my way in probably less than an hour total.
 

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Much easier then I imagined, used windex as lube, 2 small levers, and one medium. Popped the KLR up on a milk crate and 2x6, pulled front, took a dep breath, and dived in. I used another milk crate to keep the tire up while I was working on it. From start to finish, both tires, about an hour. All I need to do is get my State plates and get her registered on Base.

Chet
 

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Yeah, it was much easier than I thought it was going to be, too. Your "lift" sounds a lot like mine. I just use concrete blocks under each peg, then rock the bike back and forth and add pieces of 2x4 on top of the blocks until I get it up in the air. On the road, I carry an Eagle Mike's Quick Jack. It works good, but I've experimented with it and you have to be a lot more careful while wrenching on the bike. I'd use it if it was all I had, but if I had the option, would scrounge around the area for something else (rock, wood, etc.) to put under the bike to stabilize it while it's up on the Quick Jack.

If you want to continue to practice your tire-changing skills, you can do what I did over the Winter. I bought a cheap, Chinese "dirt bike/enduro" tire and wheel set off eBay for $20. Can't recall what size it is, but it's a good "in between" of the front and rear tires on the KLR. You can just keep it around and practice all you want, experiment with tools and patch kits, etc. For the price, you can't go wrong.
 

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Get a small bottle of baby powder... sprinkle it on the tube (and in the tire) before inserting. it will help the tube move away from the spoon before getting pinched.

:50:

Then windex carefully, the tire bead.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Saw the baby powder on the vid clip, live and learn I guess. When I replace the tube I'll be following that piece of advice.

Thanks much,

Chet
 

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A couple of these from Motion Pro:

And a third similar length iron will cure your pinched tube problem (with practice).
YMMV
 

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A friend just picked up one of these used. Tire changing is now a breeze.

 

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A good tip I learned a long time ago was to inflate the tube slightly before spooning on the last half of the tire.
This will prevent pinches and damage from tire levers.

Baby powder on the tube is a really good idea as mentioned above!
 

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One of the best tips I got from the online videos posted by the dirt bike racing guy was to just put enough air in the tube that when you hang it over your finger it forms a crease. Seems like that's the perfect way to judge just the right amount of air in the tube when putting it in. That, plus a good dusting with baby powder all over the tube and inside of the tire.
 

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A couple of these from Motion Pro:

And a third similar length iron will cure your pinched tube problem (with practice).
YMMV
24mm (rear axle nut), 22mm (front axle nut), and the 12/14mm (pictured). Costly, light, and effective.
 

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Very nice find. I would be interested if I had not alrady purchased the 22mm and 24mm MP spoons. KTM should have some spoons (made by MP) that would fit a KLR.

The MSR axle combination wrench is not the one for the KLR. Can't remember where I purchased it but I have a 22mm / 24mm metal combo wrench for the two axle nuts. I do remember talking to the company (NY state maybe) to see if they had a 17mm / 19mm combo wrench for the axle bolts and they did not and were not interested in making them. Wish I knew someone with a water jet cutter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_jet_cutter
that was intersted in making these at a reasonable cost. For cost and weight savings they could be made of aluminum.
 

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When I got my '02 I bought A K270 rear tire and a friend and I fought like heck to get it on. At first my buddy thought I had the wrong size. We had to beat the tire with a 2x4 to get the bead set. I did the front by myself, and that extra 4 inches was a lot easier. I'd hate to have to fix the rear by myself out on the road.
 

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The neat thing about the Motion Pro T-6 12/13 combo lever is that it has a raised lip that that prevents you from inserting the iron/spoon to deep into the rim resulting in no "pinched tube syndrome". Two Motion Pro T-6 12/13 combo lever and a standard spoon and I can change a tire or fix a flat anywhere.
 
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