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That small piece missing probably will not hurt anything.
Rotate the impeller by hand and watch what turns on the other side of the engine.
If its one of the balancer shafts can you hold the sprocket with a pair of pliers while removing the impeller nut.

I am hoping someone here will add to the discussion about the sprockets being out of time on the crankshaft.
 

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There is a punch mark on the camshaft sprocket on the crankshaft that
should line up with the key-way. It appears to be quite a ways off. This would explain the bent valves.
The arrow is pointing at the punch mark the circle at the top is where the mark should be.

I just wonder if that was some sort of shoddy installation at some point or if that could happen from the impact of the chains seizing up like they did. And I obviously wonder what it means for me going forward.
It had to have happened in this incident. The sprockets are press fit onto the crankshaft. Quite tightly according to European KLR owners, someone over there makes a replacement sprocket set, or so I have read!

IF one of the cam chain sprocket teeth is nearly 'Dead Center' of the crankshaft keyway, one might simply Re-Punch them or Magic Marker them for reassembly. The KLR cam timing can be off a degree or three from the factory, because there are SO Many variables that come into play. It is a tractor engine not a Ninja engine.
 
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Discussion Starter · #123 ·
@terry_g Good call on checking the other side, thank you! It’s the front balancer shaft, should be able to use that to hold it steady. And thanks again for spotting the punch hole issue!

@pdwestman thanks Paul! Looks like I have a sprocket tooth lined up pretty nicely with the keyway. I’ll have to check it with a straightedge or laser pointer to be confident though.

I do wonder—if the sprocket is press fit tightly onto the crankshaft and this budged mine, should I be concerned about other potentially unseen damage and/or the sprocket coming loose in the future?
 

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I doubt there would be any other more unseen damage.
The sprocket appears to be pressed on without a key or pin to hold them in place so its probably a tight press fit.
There is not a lot of force on the sprockets driving the cam and balancer shafts.
If it was my money I would take the chance and run it. The other alternatives are a used crank or a salvageable engine
that has been run low on oil and put your top end on it.
 

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Take a close look at the cam sprocket on the crank and make sure it didn’t rotate on the crank (and shear its woodruff key).
 

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Take a close look at the cam sprocket on the crank and make sure it didn’t rotate on the crank (and shear its woodruff key).
I don't believe that the crank sprockets are 'Keyed' at all. Otherwise we all would be able to see the keyway in his pics or on our own bikes. ;)
 

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How is the sprocket attached to the crank? I’m not sure. I’m just trying to figure out some way for the timing chain to have become mis-timed without the cam chain breaking.
 

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The cam chain tensioner was working properly so I doubt that the chain jumped a tooth.
The punch mark on the crankshaft sprocket is about 70 degrees retarded. I suspect that when the
balancer chain jammed the sprocket the force from the tire caused the crank shaft to rotate a
bit while the sprocket was jammed.

Most older north american car engines did not have cam chain tensioners. Over time the chain
would wear out and jump a tooth or two and no longer run.
 

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The punch mark on the crankshaft sprocket is about 70 degrees retarded. I suspect that when the
balancer chain jammed the sprocket the force from the tire caused the crank shaft to rotate a
bit while the sprocket was jammed.

Most older north american car engines did not have cam chain tensioners. Over time the chain
would wear out and jump a tooth or two and no longer run.
My E-type Jaguar had a cam chain tensioner and it did not prevent the chain from jumping several teeth. As a result the intake valves collided with the exhaust valves, creating an expensive repair.

But your supposition about the the cam chain sprocket slipping sounds plausible to me.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter · #133 ·
I'll suggest that the exhaust cam sprocket needs to be clamped in a bench vise & the bolt removed. Chances are high that the location dowel pin between cam & sprocket SHEARED due to impact!
If not replaced, the new EX valves will probably get bent during reassembly.
Finally found a vise. Is this is the portion of the pin you would expect to be sheared? Or will I need to remove it to inspect the remaining portion that’s still inside the camshaft?

Automotive tire Tread Wood Asphalt Road surface
 

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There’s twice as much leverage on the crank sprocket as the cam sprockets, so that is the sprocket I would expect to have rotated. In addition, the inertia of the crank and piston are much greater than the cams, so again, if anything rotated and sheared a key or pin, I would expect it to be the crank sprocket.

Paul, yes, I looked at several parts a diagrams on line. They showed the left crank flywheel assembly as an assembly, not as individual parts. However, the roller bearing, balancer sprocket, and cam sprocket must have been put in there somehow, even if they are not listed or sold separately.
 
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