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Discussion Starter #1
Im sure this has been covered before but Im not great at doing forum searches. How much stuff can I safely run on my stock electrical system? I have heated grips which I have rarely used. I want to add a light bar that I am fabricating with a three LED cube lights. One spot and two floods. As well I would like to add an USB Charger. Any input would be great

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With power management (as in, shut down stuff when you're at low rpm in traffic, etc.) I think you'll be o.k., fpurpicful.

I wired in a high-output aftermarket stator and upgraded rectifier/regulator; works o.k., but . . . puts out LESS juice at idle, and MORE at higher rpm; fact to consider in, "power management."
 

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With some LED upgrading you'll find some extra power. GoMotor has posted a reference showing the draw of various lights, etc.


Dave
 

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I ran headed grips, a jacket and socks. Get the power you need by changing the bulbs to LED. The headlight is he main one but also change the taillight and the dash bulbs all to LED. I never had any problems on my 09 or my 2014 1/2.
 

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If you are going to run lots of power consuming accessories, you should install a digital volt meter to know when to cut some load if necessary. I don't like those color changing types (red is low voltage, yellow medium, green good......)

The gen2 has about 100 extra watts to play with (ignoring the fan motor which normally would not be running much when you need lots of light). You can pick up about 20 watts each by switching the stock light bulbs to LEDs, but I don't like the focus of LED bulbs in the stock housing/reflectors. I do like LED lights in a dedicated pod with proper reflectors.


ELECTRICAL USAGE in Watts: Gen2

Dash meter lights 3 x 3.4 = 10.2
Tail Light 8
Tag light 8
Low beam headlight 55
High beam light (Gen-2 only) 55
High beam indicator 3.4
Ignition system ??
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Gen-2 = 139.6 Gen-1 = 84.6

NOT USED FULL TIME IN COLD WEATHER
Radiator fan gen1 about 35 per Jeffsaline
Neutral indicator 3.4
Brake light 27
Turn signals 2 x 23 = 46
Turn indicator 3.4

Gen-1 Alternator 14 Amps at 14 Volts = 196 Watts
Gen-2 Alternator 17 Amps at 14 Volts = 238 Watts
 

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That looks very similar to the one I got of the net. I installed it to the right of the turn signal arrows and above the three little dimples in that area. There is just enough room behind there for it to fit nicely. Measure twice and cut once.
 

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2 in 1 Motorcycle Dual USB Adapter & Voltmeter Handlebar Mounted

I bought one of these handlebar mount volt meters and am liking it so far. I have not fully pressure tested it in a hard rain, but I have had it in temps of 110 degrees Fahrenheit, and it's holding strong.

(You'll have to search for this yourself on Amazon because the mods require that I have posted 15 times in this forum before I can post a comment with a URL) Search for: "2 in 1 Motorcycle Dual USB Phone Charger & Blue Voltmeter 5V 3.1A Handlebar Mounting"

I've it paired up with a Braketron Qi Wireless phone charger, just in case you're curious.
 

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First thing after I installed my volt meter was notice the voltage dropping while sitting at long stoplights with the brake on. So, I went to WalMart and bought a LED 1157 bulb and swapped it out in the taillight and now no matter how long the stop light is, it stays steady. Another thing if running lots of extras is to keep the idle up near max. This not only will help keep your battery charged, but will also keep better oil pressure at idle.
 

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If you are going to run lots of power consuming accessories, you should install a digital volt meter to know when to cut some load if necessary. I don't like those color changing types (red is low voltage, yellow medium, green good......)

The gen2 has about 100 extra watts to play with (ignoring the fan motor which normally would not be running much when you need lots of light). You can pick up about 20 watts each by switching the stock light bulbs to LEDs, but I don't like the focus of LED bulbs in the stock housing/reflectors. I do like LED lights in a dedicated pod with proper reflectors.


ELECTRICAL USAGE in Watts: Gen2

Dash meter lights 3 x 3.4 = 10.2
Tail Light 8
Tag light 8
Low beam headlight 55
High beam light (Gen-2 only) 55
High beam indicator 3.4
Ignition system ??
----
Gen-2 = 139.6 Gen-1 = 84.6

NOT USED FULL TIME IN COLD WEATHER
Radiator fan gen1 about 35 per Jeffsaline
Neutral indicator 3.4
Brake light 27
Turn signals 2 x 23 = 46
Turn indicator 3.4

Gen-1 Alternator 14 Amps at 14 Volts = 196 Watts
Gen-2 Alternator 17 Amps at 14 Volts = 238 Watts
looks like if the high beam's on both the Gen1 and Gen2 would have approximately the same amount of extra wattage (ignoring whatever the Gen2 ignition sucks up) though IIRC the last thread on this topic from Jeff showed more than one Gen1 alternator and some literature showing that the 1996+ alternator may have been 17 amps too. In any case, I swapped my headlight from 55watts to JNS's LED unit at 23(?) and my taillight/brakelight from the stock 8/27 to a WOW unit at 1.4/10.

the turn signals would be my next focus but I'm not sure if there is enough benefit given the very small amount of time these lights are actually illuminated.....and I haven't found an LED solution that is bright enough.

Dave
 

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First thing after I installed my volt meter was notice the voltage dropping while sitting at long stoplights with the brake on. So, I went to WalMart and bought a LED 1157 bulb and swapped it out in the taillight and now no matter how long the stop light is, it stays steady. Another thing if running lots of extras is to keep the idle up near max. This not only will help keep your battery charged, but will also keep better oil pressure at idle.
PaddyD-Did you have to install something along with the LED to make it work?? Like a relay?
 

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PaddyD-Did you have to install something along with the LED to make it work?? Like a relay?
Nothing extra at all. Simply replace one bulb with another..
The only time you might need a relay switch is if adding high draw items like extra running lights and want to use a light duty on/off switch. The LED bulb in the taillight draws considerably less current than the factory stock bulb so in reality, your brake light switch is way more than adequate to turn it on and off.
 
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.....the turn signals would be my next focus....
Turn signals will be a problem. Your turn signal flasher depends on the current draw of the bulbs for it to work. The problem can be solved but those bulbs are seldom used anyway. I'd leave them incandescent.
 

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Leaving the turn signals incandescent eliminates an installation problem with LEDs:

The dashboard indicator light on a stock system's current is REVERSED when changed from left- to right-turn signaling. LEDs respond to only one-way current. Thus . . . a sort of "rectifier" (fashioned from diodes) must be installed for uniform dashboard indicator light function.

At least, that was the case with my riding companion's Generation 2.
 

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I'm aware of the requirement to add a "resistor" of some sort with the LED signals....what I'm not sure of is if it's worth it from a power consumption perspective - I'm guessing not.


Dave
 

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I'm aware of the requirement to add a "resistor" of some sort with the LED signals....what I'm not sure of is if it's worth it from a power consumption perspective - I'm guessing not.


Dave
A resistor is going to eat up as much current as the incandescent bulbs would have. A electronic flasher relay would solve that problem but I wouldn't worry about such a seldom used power consumer as turn signal bulbs. If I had to have every last drop, I may change my mind. You could always mount a bunch of generators that rub the sidewall ;):

 

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A resistor is going to eat up as much current as the incandescent bulbs would have. A electronic flasher relay would solve that problem but I wouldn't worry about such a seldom used power consumer as turn signal bulbs. If I had to have every last drop, I may change my mind. You could always mount a bunch of generators that rub the sidewall ;):

LOL; I had one of those on my bicycle in the '70's......If I rode downhill, I could get a barely detectable glow!


Yes, I figured as much on the resistor front and even without that issue, the signals are in use for such a small fraction of time, I'm going to leave them as-is.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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A resistor is going to eat up as much current as the incandescent bulbs would have. A electronic flasher relay would solve that problem but I wouldn't worry about such a seldom used power consumer as turn signal bulbs. If I had to have every last drop, I may change my mind. You could always mount a bunch of generators that rub the sidewall ;):

LOL. 12V 6 Watts wouldn't even power a full complement of LED dash lights would it, Toney?
 
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