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So, I took what is likely the last ride of the year the other day and the bike is in my non-heated garage with half a tank of non-ethanol premium fuel in it. I let it sit for a month prior to the ride, and the battery didn't have enough juice to start it. I had to remove the battery, clean connections, and charge it in the warm house.

Bike then started right up. I'm planning on upgrading the OEM battery to a lithium unit that is lighter and higher-cranking.

The dealer I bought the bike from installed a battery tender plug-in, so it is ready to go. However, I think that you have to buy a battery tender that is specific for a lithium or AGM battery, correct?

I don't want to buy a battery tender for the OEM battery, and then when I go to upgrade to the lithium, need to buy another battery tender.

So, I'm thinking that the bike will just sit for the next four months and when I am ready to ride in the spring, just plan on buying the new lithium battery.

My last toy was a Honda Pioneer 500 UTV with an OEM battery and I would go out and start it once a month at least to let it warm up and even drive it around in the snow. It never needed a new battery in 4 years.

But, it seems like the OEM battery in the KLR needs fully charged after sitting in cold weather for more than a couple of weeks due to the KLR not liking to start in cold weather.

For those that don't use a battery tender with the OEM battery and are in cold climates, how often do you have to go out and start the bike in order to keep the battery from dying? Once a week? Every two weeks?
 

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I haven't made the upgrade to lithium myself, but probably will when my OEM battery dies. I too have a pigtail installed on my KLR so I can just plug the battery tender into the bike for a few days every month during the winter. If I couldn't do that, I think I'd actually remove the battery from the bike and store it somewhere warm for the winter rather than firing the bike up periodically; that's what I do with the rest of my equipment that has a battery (riding mower, dirt bikes, etc.) I do however rotate my tender among those several batteries during the winter. I believe there are now chargers/tenders that allow you to select your battery "chemistry" on the unit and will charge multiple types, e.g. lead acid and lithium.
 

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fill the tank completely with ethanol free gas. going only halfway gives a load of room for condensation to build up. that water will be an issue come spring and can rust out the inside of your tank.

don't start the bike through the winter to charge the battery, more damage than good. it sounds like you already own a charger, so disconnect (better yet remove) the battery and put the charger on it every couple of weeks or leave it on and put the charger on a timer. a couple hours a week will do the trick.

pretty sure they make battery tenders that go both ways now too.
 

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So, I'm thinking that the bike will just sit for the next four months and when I am ready to ride in the spring, just plan on buying the new lithium battery
overlooked this part. if you're just going to buy a lithium in the spring..... I'd do it now if possible. the world is going to be a very different place and now that we can admit we're in a recession it's only going to get worse..... far worse, third world worse.

if you have no intention of using the LA battery again, take it out of the bike and recycle it. if you allow it to die in the bike during freezing temperatures it will freeze and piss its contents all over your bike as it thaws.
 

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Buy a Battery tender brand trickle charger with lithium compatibility. Something like 30 bucks? Most lithium batteries will not need to be topped off unless it's stored more than 1 year from my experience. Removing the battery(lithium or not) and bringing it inside a basement workshop works as well. It works for me. Winter sucks.
 

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So, I took what is likely the last ride of the year the other day and the bike is in my non-heated garage with half a tank of non-ethanol premium fuel in it. I let it sit for a month prior to the ride, and the battery didn't have enough juice to start it. I had to remove the battery, clean connections, and charge it in the warm house.

Bike then started right up. I'm planning on upgrading the OEM battery to a lithium unit that is lighter and higher-cranking.
I'll bet dollars to donuts that your selling dealership filled its battery & charged it on an automatic battery charger like a Battery Tender, rather than an old fashioned straight rate 1amp trickle charger.
Therefore it Never got a Full Charge Initially. This makes a Weak battery that will Always Fail Early and was not and never will be as strong or durable as it could have been.

I learned this the hard way when the automatic "charger / maintainers" first came out!

If you don't ride below about 35F, remove your existing battery as you put your bike into winter storage and simply purchase the new lithium battery at your earliest convenience.
And if you wish a lithium switchable Battery Tender Jr.
You can use the extra leads on your other power products batteries, boat, mower, generator, etc.
 

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2022 Kawasaki KLR 650 Gen 3
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I'll toss in my yearly ritual.

Ride to the gas station. Toss in some Stabil. Fill tank up to the very top. Ride home. Throw it up on the center stand. Slightly deflate the tires. Clean the chain and protect from rust. REMOVE the battery completely from the bike and store it on the shelf in the garage. Charge on the first of every month with an 800 milliamp Battery Tender for 24 hours. I used to change the oil at this time, but oil has gotten so much better since the days of SD/SF that I don't bother. I once left a battery in my old Savage all year with just the pigtails to a "smart charger" and was met in the Spring with a ruined battery, battery box, and just a complete mess. Since then, the battery comes out. BTW, I'm still a flooded/lead acid battery guy who doesn't mind checking the water level monthly. They're generally cheaper and I can usually bring them back if they're dead. Usually.

Regards, Jim.
 

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I’m in the South and ride all winter so batteries aren’t as much of an issue. I try to top off the tank before I store ANY vehicle more than a few weeks if temps are below freezing. An ounce (or gallon) of prevention is worth a pound of cure in the fuel department.
 

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Just fill up a can and top off the tank. Do this with all 4 bikes. Shot of Stabil never hurts. Been doing this for decades with no problems in the spring. Bikes sit 3-4 months every year.

Few years back I left a battery in and it froze. The damage it did to the bike was very extensive. Ate up some plastics and destroyed the paint on the frame and swing arm. For the little bit of effort just take it out. I'm in WI and we will see -30 or less sometimes.
 

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Without a draw, lithium batteries will hold a charge for a long time. I wouldn't even worry about a trickle charger with a lithium battery. They just don't work the same way as normal lead-acid batteries.

Not to say you can't get a low-amp charger for them, and it would definitely be a good idea to have something available to charge one, but you shouldn't need to stick one on a trickle charger over the winter.
 

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+1 for lithium-iron. LiFe for the win
 

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+1 for lithium-iron. LiFe for the win
Just don't expect any lithium battery to crank well when near 30F / -1C and under.

In 20F temps last week on my Gen 1 carbureted bike, with Lithium battery, had not been run in 2-3 weeks.
Key ON / lights on, wait a minute or two.
Full cold start enrichener.
Attempt to crank, relay goes buzzzzz.
Wait 2 minutes, attempt to crank, goes buzzzzz, buzzz.
Wait 2 minutes, attempt to crank, goes Buzzz, starter motor goes grr, engine goes whut! Relay goes buzzzz.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes Grrr, engine goes whut, whut, whut! Relay goes buzzzz.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes GRrr, engine goes whut, whut, whut, Whump, whump, whump.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes GRRRrr, engine goes WHUmp, WHump, Whump.whump,whump.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes GRRRRR, engine goes WHUMP, WHUMp, WHUmp, boom, boom, Boom,BOom, BOOm, BOOM. Finally!

Yeah, each attempt was stronger as the lithium battery warmed-up. But it took at least a full 10 minutes.
An AGM or conventional flooded cell would have been cranking Full Strength on first attempt & the engine probably would have started on the second attempt.
And I'd have been on the road in 5 minutes or less.
 

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Just don't expect any lithium battery to crank well when near 30F / -1C and under.

In 20F temps last week on my Gen 1 carbureted bike, with Lithium battery, had not been run in 2-3 weeks.
Key ON / lights on, wait a minute or two.
Full cold start enrichener.
Attempt to crank, relay goes buzzzzz.
Wait 2 minutes, attempt to crank, goes buzzzzz, buzzz.
Wait 2 minutes, attempt to crank, goes Buzzz, starter motor goes grr, engine goes whut! Relay goes buzzzz.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes Grrr, engine goes whut, whut, whut! Relay goes buzzzz.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes GRrr, engine goes whut, whut, whut, Whump, whump, whump.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes GRRRrr, engine goes WHUmp, WHump, Whump.whump,whump.
Wait a minute, attempt to crank, starter motor goes GRRRRR, engine goes WHUMP, WHUMp, WHUmp, boom, boom, Boom,BOom, BOOm, BOOM. Finally!

Yeah, each attempt was stronger as the lithium battery warmed-up. But it took at least a full 10 minutes.
An AGM or conventional flooded cell would have been cranking Full Strength on first attempt & the engine probably would have started on the second attempt.
And I'd have been on the road in 5 minutes or less.
That's a (lithium iron) you have or other lithium type battery?
 

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it took at least a full 10 minutes.
that's with the headlight on?

they definitely do not like the cold, it doesn't seem to have any effect on the storage of power, just the delivery. pretty sure they don't much like taking a charge down at those temperatures either. that's why planes and cars have climate control for the battery compartment.
 

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Exactly correct. In fact, it's recommended to store Lithium type batteries in the refridgerator (in a fireproof bag, for LiPo) because it stalls the chemical reaction that will slowly discharge the battery.

Freezing temps won't damage a lithium battery, but they'll definitely prevent one from putting out proper amperage.
 

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That's a (lithium iron) you have or other lithium type battery?
WPS #490-2524 / Featherweight Lithium Battery / 250CCA / HJTX14AH-FP-Q / 12V48WH
"Lithium Ion Polymer Technology"
Made in China
Probably a no longer available model. Can't remember how old.


that's with the headlight on?
Yes! With a halogen H4 55/60 watt on high beam & all other incandescent bulbs.
 

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I haven't tried mine at or below freezing but IIRC they are intended to have a load for a bit to warm them up - I think they say to put the headlight on for a couple minutes. I have started mine in relatively cold temps (maybe 5 degrees C) with no special procedure and no issues but then, I have absolutely zero desire to ride my motorcycles in freezing temperatures. The benefits of Lithium far outweigh any negatives for me.....never going back.


Dave
 
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