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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Stripped a screw.....HELP

So I was going to add some brake fluid to the front master cylinder today. The first screw came out of the lid no problem, the second broke the tip off my screwdriver and then melted like butter under the second. This is the first time I attempted to take the lid off btw, I've only put about a thousand miles on the bike and was going to top off all the fluids today.:(

Any suggestions?
 

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So I was going to add some brake fluid to the front master cylinder today. The first screw came out of the lid no problem, the second broke the tip off my screwdriver and then melted like butter under the second. This is the first time I attempted to take the lid off btw, I've only put about a thousand miles on the bike and was going to top off all the fluids today.:(

Any suggestions?

OK 1st thing the master cylinder is made of cast metal (magnesium or aluminum) so you can break it, OK?

Get something like a small chisel with a sharp edge. Use one of ends of the phillips hole to place the chisel. Tap it and chase the chisel counterclockwise to turn the screw, make sense?
 

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Yes sir, I feel your pain. Those screws have been unanimously voted most likely to strip every year since 1984 when the KLR 600 came out. My first attempt would be with a size larger Phillips head screw driver. Set it in place, tap it with a hammer to set it. Attempt to break screw loose. Next step would be a small bladed standard screw driver, tapped with hammer to set it.

I have had luck tapping one of these torx drivers into the slot and getting it to break loose.





If that doesn't do it, dremel a slot for a standard screwdriver. I have turned them out with a small, sharp cold chisel. Careful with the hammer, that ain't an anvil under that screw!

Once you get it out, I would suggest a different replacement type screw. I use these, and have no trouble. Most Ace or other hardware stores.

 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
thanks guys.


Edit; I just took it down to the dealer to see if they could do a quick fix.......they could, the mechanic took care of it in 5 mins. I slipped him a 20 and went on my way.
 

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Get rid of the philips head screws. I replaced mine with allan head stainless. Same goes for the screws in the mirror bracket. You'll strip them too.

Phillips screws have got to be the worst invention by mankind.
 

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Get rid of the philips head screws. I replaced mine with allan head stainless. Same goes for the screws in the mirror bracket. You'll strip them too.

Phillips screws have got to be the worst invention by mankind.

The phillips screws on Japanese bikes are different than American and Euro phillips. American screwdivers tend to strip them out.

Japanese Phillips Screws
 

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I realize it's an old thread but 2008 KLR650 here and got the same issue. Used the chisel method, carefully done to remove the butter-headed Philips screw that stripped with barely any torque being applied.
After placing allen head tapered screws I continue to have an "evasive" leak I can't manage to pin point where the fluid reaches the lowest level in a couple days leaving me with basically no front brake. Not knowing where the leak happens for sure as I see no huge evidence that would justify such a fast "empty out", I can only think it's the screws that are not holding a tight seal as there's evidence of some fluid coming out from the screw areas and where the reservoir meets the lid. I can't tighten the screws more than they already are. I have only 2 options left. Buy new screws and make sure the ones I have are not too long and not well fitting (hence causing the leak) or buy the whole new reservoir in case the removal by tapping somehow damaged (though there are no visible evidences whatsoever) the reservoir and its lid.

With that will curse the cretins who designed that system when it could've been made nearly indestructible or at least extremely long lasting.

<rant>
Those Philips screws in the master cylinder of the front break are a complete and utter joke. Using Philips screws anywhere something needs to be held tightly in place AND removed periodically, it's complete nonsense.

Allen head stainless screws (tapered) is the only way you can make sure that won't happen next time. Philips screws could be OK in carpentry for "set-and-forget-it" builds where only removal will be at the time of demolition work, but using them for master cylinders like done in the Kawis, where at the very least once every year (in the most conservative cases) those screws will need to be removed and re-used to hold once again a tight seal, it's an act of sheer idiocy. The engineer/s who made such flawed design decision should be put to clean latrines since that'd be all they would be good at (with some luck that is).
</rant>
 

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I'll give your rant only a 3.2 since this is a family forum.

If its leaking that badly it should be easy to spot from where. Tie a bungee cord to the front brake lever applying pressure to it for a period of time and look for it.
 

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Family forum? Did I use inappropriate language if so I apologize, but I believe I kept it clean... I don't think I dropped F-bombs anywhere o_O :)

Thanks for the bungee suggestion, much appreciated. I will try although bike is not in a garage (where I could easily spot leaks placing some newspapers to see if anything could be leaking from the front caliper, but it's parked on the street with protective cover. The bungee should work regardless to help spot the leak, so thanks again for the useful tip ;D

Cheers!
 

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Too late for freakqnc and others, but to reiterate Spec's post above (thread is older and the link doesn't work):

http://www.rjrcooltools.com/jis.cfm

Worth buying a set of drivers or bits just for the sole purpose of removing the brake reservoir and carburetor top screws prior to replacement with A-head fasteners.

I believe LoneRider has noted that you can experiment with crafting your own JIS driver by employing a bench grinder to kind of flatten/blunt the tip of a "regular" Phillips so it better engages the JIS screw head.
 

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Those Philips screws in the master cylinder of the front break are a complete and utter joke. Using Philips screws anywhere something needs to be held tightly in place AND removed periodically, it's complete nonsense.
Wouldn't make such an absolute statement myself; however, I hear you, and undrsand how one might!

First of all, they ain't "Phillips-head screws!"

No!

The heads are JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard); a JIS bit is more optimal when removing these screws than a SAE Phillips bit.

The master cylinder cover fasteners are compounded by the GALVANIC CORROSION, and attendant adhesion, of dissimilar metals--steel machine screws, and an alloy reservoir casting.

Besides JIS screwdriver bits, an IMPACT DRIVER is welcome in these difficult cases. An impact driver applies torque only when the threads are unloaded by the force of a hammer blow; thus--boogering the screw heads is less likely than with a regular screwdriver.

JIS screwdriver bits, and an impact driver, each enhance master cylinder cover (and carburetor) machine screw removal. Anti-seize compound? Stainless steel screws? Ain't tried them, but . . . might help.
 

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Family forum? Did I use inappropriate language if so I apologize, but I believe I kept it clean... I don't think I dropped F-bombs anywhere o_O :)

Thanks for the bungee suggestion, much appreciated. I will try although bike is not in a garage (where I could easily spot leaks placing some newspapers to see if anything could be leaking from the front caliper, but it's parked on the street with protective cover. The bungee should work regardless to help spot the leak, so thanks again for the useful tip ;D

Cheers!
Things I can think of to check...

There's a rubber gasket on the lid of the reservoir, be sure it's in good shape and seated correctly.

Don't overfill the reservoir, should be just at the top of the site glass. Hydraulic fluid expands when hot. It will eventually leak out at the seals if there's no room to expand.

Check the banjo bolts that hold on the brake lines. They have a gasket on them.

Get some brake cleaner and clean off everything. Should make it easier to find the leak.
 

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What the other guys already said. Interestingly the aftermarket has picked up on our "screw" problems and it is easy to replace pretty much any screw with an Alan wrench head on it....they are on both my brake res.fluid caps!
 
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