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Well, after watching a few plastic fix videos and reading a ton of write ups, I talked to a local marina. The guys was very nice and had tale after tale of local storm damages from hurricanes to boaters crashing in the docks. Hr said never use flame or heat. It will cause the plastic to age extremely quick. He said to always sand with wet sanding paper and go to 2000 grit. Then polish with a UV boaters polish. I skipped the "special" polish and used the Meguires I had on hand. I also did not use the 2000 grit. My arm was soar from sanding. I stopped at 1500grit. So that took about 3 hrs. The only reason I decided to do this was Covid cabin fever mixed with a weeks worth of rain and no work. It turned out great. The problem is now its the best looking plastic on the bike. In the last pic you will see the bolt missing. I just found this out today. I do a walk around and check tires, oil level, cables. Even bolts. But must have miss it.
Mean Green
IMG_20200417_204706_510_1590342233796.jpg IMG_20200417_204706_510_1590342233796.jpg IMG_20200417_204706_510_1590342233796.jpg
 

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That's the way we did our "headlight restores" at the shop. It worked on plastic headlights. You just sand off the old surface plastic and polish what's left.
 

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Damn good work there - but now you have to keep it out of the sun.

Olive-drab green plastics were the worst, followed by the Persimmon red, very prone to fading and developing white-ish cream surface with prolonged exposure.
 

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If you want to save your hard work; cover it with Factory Effex clear numberplate background - it will increase the shine, stop the UV damage and help prevent scratches

Dave
 

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Thanks Dave. I was hoping I wouldn't have to spray bomb it. Though some vikes do look good when done. I know its a KLR. But I am one of those strange folks who love the utilitarian look of the Gen 1 bike. I also have found myself having a bit of pride in a 20+ yr old like that still looks new.
 

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Dave is your bike wrapped with the clear plastic? If not what do you use to keep it protected.
 

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headlight shroud and side plates are covered with Factory Effex clear (sideplates have the yellow background under that) The front fender in the pic is new as I found it too hard to clear.

Dave
 

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Can you tell us more about the Factory Effex clear plastic, like what size you get, where you get it from, and what your process is like for applying it?

I got a roll of that 3M clear body panel adhesive from eBay last year and cut various pieces to cover plastics on the KLR. I learned that it was best to use the 'pro' method of applying, misting everything a mix of water, isopropyl alcohol and dish soap (a squirt bottle mostly full of water, with fair but small bit of alcohol, and just a drop of soap). This lets you reposition the clear plastic, then you use a plastic squeegee to push the water out from under it. Perfect surface at that point.

I have it on the side fairings where my knees rub against them, on the top surfaces of those fairings where stuff tends to get placed, and on the gas tank to protect it from the tank bag. It looks like you've got a continuous piece of clear across the different surfaces of the headlight shroud, which I'm curious about. If that's the case, how did you get the clear plastic to curve around? I found that for those complex surfaces I basically had to make a piece for each facet.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I was thinking the same. It looks like wrapping it would be a stretch. Unless one could find the clear that stretches.
PJ
 

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https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/factory-effex-universal-background-sheet

they come in 12" x 18" sheets. I've used them for years on our offroad race bikes (prior to the advent of cheap customized graphics packages) with great success. The product will take reasonable compound curves like the side covers.....it takes a bit of practice but isn't too hard. I usually hit it with a hair dryer or (carefully) a heat gun after the fact just to get it to mould to the pce better but this isn't strictly necessary.

I'm sure there are other products that may work, but these have been proven to hold up to years of riding, washing and crashing.

Dave
 
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