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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I know I did something wrong but I want to learn so if you're willing to point out my dumb mistake it'd be very much appreciated. Here is the previous thread where I talk about buying a carb that's missing a decelerator cable attachment point: new klr250 cvk34 carburetor has no deceleration cable slot
Someone mentioned its probably from an atv. I decide to use it temporally while I learn more about carbs(not just clean it, but learn how it works while its off the bike and can hold it).

When I hooked it up, I'm pretty sure I connected the petcock not to the fuel line but the vent nozzle. Now I realized something was wrong when the carb just sprayed fuel AND the kickstart felt stuck. I didn't force it but I did move it some. I switched the connection to the fuel line nozzle but the gas did not flow when I opened the petcock. I connected the gas to the same spot on the old carb and the fuel did flow so I figured the reason the fuel didn't flow on the new carb was because it was installed on the bike.

I then started the bike, fuel was flowing and I figured everything was fine but then it started to smoke towards the front of the bike. No weird noises but I decided enough mistakes for today. I really want to try to fix this on my own but admitting small mistakes with the fuel line is better than ruining the bike. I will try to post pics and a video of the smoke. I also have a fire extinguisher nearby if anyone's wondering
 

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Well, here goes post #12,000 from me! That only Averages about 1000 per year. :)

The flooded carb flooded the engine cylinder & combustion chamber.
Chances are high that the exhaust header pipe gasket is burned out or slightly loose.
The raw gasoline in the exhaust port drooled thru/around the gasket & onto the header pipe.
As the exhaust header pipe got hot, it started smoking the raw gas until it dispersed.

That upper LH carb air vent nipple should have about an 8" hose routed down behind the engine.
 

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I switched the connection to the fuel line nozzle but the gas did not flow when I opened the petcock.
That was because the float bowl was Already Over-filled from fuel being connected to the float bowl atmospheric air vent nipple first.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well, here goes post #12,000 from me! That only Averages about 1000 per year. :)

The flooded carb flooded the engine cylinder & combustion chamber.
Chances are high that the exhaust header pipe gasket is burned out or slightly loose.
The raw gasoline in the exhaust port drooled thru/around the gasket & onto the header pipe.
As the exhaust header pipe got hot, it started smoking the raw gas until it dispersed.

That upper LH carb air vent nipple should have about an 8" hose routed down behind the engine.
THANK YOU
I guess first thing is to check on that gasket! Also I had a question about the air vent nipple hose. It fell off and I will definitely replace it now. when I got the bike it was just hanging off the back. Is it supposed to be connected to something else on the other end? I know I should be able to find these answers myself but when I looked in the manual I bought, it showed all the bikes pieces in separate groups but not how to connect the parts. I also bought a supplemental manual aswell.

I know all these newbie questions can be annoying but please bear with me. I just need guidance on where to look. I will learn fast! If I'm learning too slow, throw a wrench until I pick up the pace.
 

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Is it supposed to be connected to something else on the other end?
No.
If that air vent is capped off, it will cause the float to Not float high enough to close the float valve and will cause a flooding condition Again.
If that air vent becomes submerged underwater while running it prevents the engine from sucking fuel up thru the jets and the engine will die.
Some people will install a plastic 'T' fitting directly aft of the carb & run a second air hose up under the fuel tank and curl back downward a bit. This prevents stalling in normal depth water, when the lower hose tip is submerged.
 

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If the engine was sprayed with degreaser & washed with water (even HOT Water) before starting your project, the entire exhaust header will smoke for a bit upon first start-up, everytime. :)

Glad that your engine runs. :) Turn your fuel valve OFF, everytime you turn the key off, just to be safe from possible flooding. Don't need 2 gallons of gasoline in the crankcase.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If the engine was sprayed with degreaser & washed with water (even HOT Water) before starting your project, the entire exhaust header will smoke for a bit upon first start-up, everytime. :)

Glad that your engine runs. :) Turn your fuel valve OFF, everytime you turn the key off, just to be safe from possible flooding. Don't need 2 gallons of gasoline in the crankcase.
thank you for the advice and the knowledge. You really are the man. Can you tell me about yourself? When did you start riding, what bikes did you have/ currently have, and what do you do or where so you look when unsure about something?
 

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Can you tell me about yourself? When did you start riding, what bikes did you have/ currently have, and what do you do or where so you look when unsure about something?
I started riding/working on motorcycles in 1969. Currently riding '87 KLR650 & KX500. I've only owned 12 personal motorcycles. Grew up in small town WY, fix it yourself or go without. First basket-case transmission/engine rebuild at age 13 on 1965 Honda S65, with older brothers help.
Tom Schmitz, aka Souperdoo has a short blub about me, a few paragraphs down in this article, sorry the links are broken.

These mods could be used on the KLR250's & KLR600's also.
 
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