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I don't know if its the same now but why would they ever change the recipe with that enormous success?
To the best of my knowledge, HD is still using the "Less than 5000 unit's" clause of any one Exact Model Number to circumvent several EPA regulations.

How many of each XL, FXD, FLD, FLS, FLH, FLT's have how much more 'alphabet soup' in their complete model Identification?

That loop hole eventually has to change!
 

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I pretty much agree, with a small correction: the Sportster of 1972 is several generations removed from the sportster of today. The visual cues are the same, but I doubt there’s a single part in common. Even HD has converted to (mostly) metric fasteners now. The engineering attention devoted to the engine internals is as advanced as any Euro or Japanese manufacturer. HD was the first to employ ion current sensing to detect onset of detonation. The quality of the paint and chrome is world-leading.

Yes, they’re expensive, but you get what you pay for too. They may not be your style, but I won’t argue with you if you like vanilla ice cream and I like chocolate chip!
 

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For everyone that is complaining about the 2022 KLR I would point out that the two other oldies but goodies (XR650 and DR650s) cost $6,999 and $6,799 vs $6,699 for a fresh 2022 KLR. The other two have no led lighting, no EFI, no digital display, and are modern day classics. I hope no problem with this, but they are a bit overpriced IMHO. You gotta hand it to Kawasaki that they have managed to update, but keep the price the same as the 2018 model. To each their own, but to me the KLR650 is a solid value.

Thanks
 

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For everyone that is complaining about the 2022 KLR I would point out that the two other oldies but goodies (XR650 and DR650s) cost $6,999 and $6,799 vs $6,699 for a fresh 2022 KLR. The other two have no led lighting, no EFI, no digital display, and are modern day classics. I hope no problem with this, but they are a bit overpriced IMHO. You gotta hand it to Kawasaki that they have managed to update, but keep the price the same as the 2018 model. To each their own, but to me the KLR650 is a solid value.

Thanks

I was going to buy a drz400 and even had a list of mods.... Seat, lights, jets, mirrors, windshield, gas tank.... Then I saw that the klr has all of this, plus fuel injection, bigger breaks, higher weigh capacity, nice display, and cheaper.

I can't stop riding the damn thing. The only thing I'm going to change is the tires. Really leaning towards the tkc80s
 

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Hi Phil here, new forum member and soon to be a new 2022 KLR Adventure owner ( deposit paid, bike arrives in a couple of weeks)
After reading many of the comments regarding the new KLR I can understand the view of many of the current KLR owners. It is very similar to the reactions the 8th gen VFR got ( a bike I have owned for over five years and absolutely love)
While the new KLR may not have fulfilled the hopes of many of the current KLR owners it certainly got my attention, and I believe for the riding I intend to do it will be perfect. The fact that the new model remained an inexpensive motorcycle was a main factor in my decision.
The Suzuki DL 650 while $1000 cheaper hasn’t got the fuel capacity, is still carbureted, also has a five speed gearbox, doesn’t have a screen, the seat (I am told) is not comfortabLe, still doesn’t have LED lighting, and doesn’t have an LCD display ( I have nothing against analogue dashes). The cost of modifying these would make the Suzuki a far more expensive bike.
From where I live there are really only three rides available to me, one of which is 130km of nearly straight highway. The KLR will open up to me a number of new routes that I can’t do on either of my current bikes ( 2015 Honda VFR800, 2015 Triumph America) Being 62 years old I am not looking to attempt difficult trails, just some dirt and gravel roads and a few easy tracks.
The reputation of the KLR’s convinced me that this was a good choice for my needs. I am not unaware of some of the drawbacks of these bikes but still believe I will be very happy with my choice.
I look forward to participating in this forum.
 

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Welcome to the forum, PhilW.
And we will all be looking forward to your review of the NEW bike after a few weeks to get acquainted with each other. :)
 
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Where did the added weight come from with the 22? I can see some with the fuel pump. Maybe a little bit with the increased thickness of the brake rotors and the axle diameter increase but it just doesn't add seem to add up to 24 lbs. Another thing I wonder is if the plastic is unbreakable. They're starting to show up around here so maybe I can finally see one.
 

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Where did the added weight come from with the 22? I can see some with the fuel pump. Maybe a little bit with the increased thickness of the brake rotors and the axle diameter increase but it just doesn't add seem to add up to 24 lbs. Another thing I wonder is if the plastic is unbreakable. They're starting to show up around here so maybe I can finally see one.
The same place it did in 2008 when they added 25lbs; death by a thousand cuts. In 2008 a big chunk was them cheaping out and using a steel lower triple clamp - it appears they did the same thing in 2022 with the swingarm.....the rest is likely a few ounces in dozens of places.

.....and nothing is unbreakable. ;-) The plastic looks like it's ABS (like the Gen2) rather than poly (like the Gen1) - ABS is more brittle.

Dave
 

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The same place it did in 2008 when they added 25lbs; death by a thousand cuts. In 2008 a big chunk was them cheaping out and using a steel lower triple clamp - it appears they did the same thing in 2022 with the swingarm.....the rest is likely a few ounces in dozens of places.

.....and nothing is unbreakable. ;-) The plastic looks like it's ABS (like the Gen2) rather than poly (like the Gen1) - ABS is more brittle.

Dave
I thought the biggest weight gain in the gen 2 was the steel framework to support the dash/fairing. I'll stick with the gen 1 if that's the case.
 

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The whole fork assembly of the Gen2 is bigger and thicker than the Gen1, not just the lower triple clamp. Switching the lower clamp from aluminum to steel only added a pound or so. The rear subframe is beefier too. But the main point remains, a lot of little things added up.
 

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The whole fork assembly of the Gen2 is bigger and thicker than the Gen1, not just the lower triple clamp. Switching the lower clamp from aluminum to steel only added a pound or so. The rear subframe is beefier too. But the main point remains, a lot of little things added up.

yep, fork, spokes, caliper, etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. the weird thing is that most of the things they strengthened on the Gen2 or Gen3 weren't things that were common failure points anyhow! Not sure I remember the last time someone complained about breaking an axle or pivot bolt. (for eg.)


Dave
 

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yep, fork, spokes, caliper, etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. the weird thing is that most of the things they strengthened on the Gen2 or Gen3 weren't things that were common failure points anyhow!
Agreed. Wouldn't it have been 'smarter' to have up-graded to 10mm lower sub-frame bolts and riders foot rest bolts?

Replaceable sub-frames are a good thing in case of major crash or automotive rear-ender.
 
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Where did the added weight come from with the 22? I can see some with the fuel pump. Maybe a little bit with the increased thickness of the brake rotors and the axle diameter increase but it just doesn't add seem to add up to 24 lbs. Another thing I wonder is if the plastic is unbreakable. They're starting to show up around here so maybe I can finally see one.
I'm not super sure about the added weight but the bike is pretty top heavy with a full tank of gas.

About the plastic, it is very fragile. So far this is the only real disappointing part of this bike for me. I've put her sideways in the woods twice and both time have caused damage. The first time I had to take the piece off and glue some mounting posts back on. Second time it cracked by a mounting bolt.

I have been trying to get crash bars ever since I got it but cannot find a company that sells any.

Frustrating.
 

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I'm not super sure about the added weight but the bike is pretty top heavy with a full tank of gas.

About the plastic, it is very fragile. So far this is the only real disappointing part of this bike for me. I've put her sideways in the woods twice and both time have caused damage. The first time I had to take the piece off and glue some mounting posts back on. Second time it cracked by a mounting bolt.

I have been trying to get crash bars ever since I got it but cannot find a company that sells any.

Frustrating.
Out of curiosity what caused you to tip over twice? Do you have the adventure model or the non-adventure? Just wondering if the factory engine slider guards on the adventure model prevent any damage. Thanks.
 

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Out of curiosity what caused you to tip over twice? Do you have the adventure model or the non-adventure? Just wondering if the factory engine slider guards on the adventure model prevent any damage. Thanks.
Non adventure model. No guards at this time

First time I was trying to traverse a telephone pole size tree log on the ground. I did not get enough traction to get the front end up and ended up falling over.

Second time I was on a single track slope just got on the bike and had to turn around to go downhill, and I was just starting to go when the front tire rolled over a baseball size rock, forks turned right, and the bike fell downwards on the slope.

First one I fell hard, that was totally dumb, second one was like slow motion. The first fall the bike hit the upper part of the plastic. Only true crash bars would have saved it from damage. Second crash the bottom of the painted plastic hit rocky road. Engine guards would have saved that one

I'm waiting to get full guards tope and bottoms before I go single track again. I'm just not as experienced as I need to be. Plus I was with a full tank both times. The bike is damn top heavy with a full tank. With three gallons in it feels like a dirt bike.
 

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Non adventure model. No guards at this time

First time I was trying to traverse a telephone pole size tree log on the ground. I did not get enough traction to get the front end up and ended up falling over.

Second time I was on a single track slope just got on the bike and had to turn around to go downhill, and I was just starting to go when the front tire rolled over a baseball size rock, forks turned right, and the bike fell downwards on the slope.

First one I fell hard, that was totally dumb, second one was like slow motion. The first fall the bike hit the upper part of the plastic. Only true crash bars would have saved it from damage. Second crash the bottom of the painted plastic hit rocky road. Engine guards would have saved that one

I'm waiting to get full guards tope and bottoms before I go single track again. I'm just not as experienced as I need to be. Plus I was with a full tank both times. The bike is damn top heavy with a full tank. With three gallons in it feels like a dirt bike.
I wonder how much of this also has to do with the stock tires. They feel a bit soft / slick to me, but I may just need to put more miles. Crash guards needed for sure, but will add even more weight to this baby hippo.
 
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