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Kawasaki says change oil/filter every 7.5k miles. It's 2.1 US Quarts with oil filter changed.

I respectfully but vehemently disagree. :ROFLMAO:

Using Kawasaki's own oil, 10w40 mineral based, I reached about 5k miles on this oil and I started to get more missed shifts. Especially second gear. WTF?

Changed oil and filter. Missed shifts gone.

This mirrors my own experience with my air/oil cooled DR650. Factory recommended interval was every 4k miles. Albeit the oil on this motor works harder versus the liquid cooled KLR. So by the time I reached 3k miles, I would start getting regular missed shifts to 2nd gear. With fresh oil, missed shifts go away.

With that I plan to change my oil every 3.5k - 4k miles.
My riding is 70% - 80% pavement. Lots of highway. Lots of urban riding. Off road is dry and dusty conditions.
 

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I'm not familiar with the engine and gearbox configuration; does the gearbox/clutch share the same oil as the engine? My Harley has engine oil and transmission oil, just like a car. Is the KLR not like that?
 

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2008 KLR650/685 tricked out / 2008 XR650L / 1988 XLV750R
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The motor basically hasn't changed since 1987. The books were changed from 2.5 litres of engine oil down to 2.1 litres for no reason.
The intervals as per Kawis Service and owner manuals have been all over the place over the years. It's a chaos.

Here are the interval changes for oil and valves from 1987 to today across all models A, B, C, E and F.
All numbers metric (km).
Font Rectangle Parallel Circle Number
 

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I'm not familiar with the engine and gearbox configuration; does the gearbox/clutch share the same oil as the engine? My Harley has engine oil and transmission oil, just like a car. Is the KLR not like that?
The KLR's are a Unit Construction engine & transmission, with oil cooled wet clutch, like most Japanese motorcycle engines.
Meaning that one oil lubricates & cools everything in it. I'll urge you all to tilt the bike side to side several times to drain all of its hidden cavities & refill them with 2.5 quarts of JASO MA / MA2 approved engine oil.
 

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2022 KLR650
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Yup, the recommended OCI’s/quantities are all balled up on Kawasaki’s gen 3 manual.

I would never run oil for 5,000mi on this engine. Based on EM’s extensive research and advice, he recommends an OCI of 2-3,000mi. I always fill my engine with the recommended ~2.5 quarts of oil, which brings the level above the sight glass.
Oil is cheap, engines aren’t.
 

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Oil is cheap, engines aren’t.
There have been times when I go on long hard rides, when I push the bike on hot long days well under the 3K suggested oil change milage. The next day or so after I get home, I change the oil before I take it on another ride. I've done this on several bike(s) of mine over the years and still do it today. My father told me, when I was a boy, "You can never change the oil too many times!" I remember him telling me this as if it were only yesterday. He was talking about cars and trucks at the time, but it stuck in my head, and I've applied that thought to motorcycles as well since their engines end up working pretty hard.

Not sure why I brought the above up, but I usually change my oils far sooner than OM or SM spec. Plus, I like knowing that what I'm doing [changing the oil] has a profound longevity effect and I like changing oils, there's a meditative and therapeutic aspect to it all. I'm just weird like that. 😎👍
 

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KBear is a man after my own heart. cant believe the table which is pasted above, even if it is in Km's not Miles. I take advantage of the site glass. if the color of the oil is darker than the beer's I enjoy (not a Guiness man) dark brown ale maybe, I will change it- and agreed - for my own therapy. JASO MA yada yada full synthetic. In the grand scheme of cost of ownership oil is not anything worth scrimping on. Hell, its cheaper to change the oil than it is to fill the tank with gas!
 

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My father told me, when I was a boy, "You can never change the oil too many times!" I remember him telling me this as if it were only yesterday. He was talking about cars and trucks at the time, but it stuck in my head, and I've applied that thought to motorcycles as well since their engines end up working pretty hard.
Too many newbie mechanics STRIP the KLR oil drain plug threads for me to give that recommendation.

Engine oils have Improved tremendously 'since your Father's day'.

Have you all actually read the paragraphs in my BSL's oil reports?
Do you all understand to divide the ppm of wear metals by the thousands of miles or kilometers Traveled to get a clearer picture of an oils actual performance?
Example, Iron 32 / 5k = 6.4 ppm per 1k traveled verses BSL's at that time, Iron 23 / 1.9k = 12.10 ppm per 1k traveled.

I'll suggest that higher Quality oil surpasses the BSL's Universal Averages every time, even at longer change intervals.

Maybe one ought to submit a sample or 2 to see how ones chosen oil is actually Performing?
I've been submitting samples purely in the interest of KLR research. And I've only read one other BSL oil report that seriously trumps my chosen oil.
It is in the middle of here, Laboratory Oil Analysis Thread!
You will know which one when you read it.
 

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Maybe one ought to submit a sample or 2 to see how ones chosen oil is actually Performing?
Blackstone oil analysis samples have been done many times by other klr owners. One can google the web to view their findings.
No need to continue the monotony unless one is curious as to how their own engine is performing. I don’t care enough to submit a sample, I’ve read enough on the topic to make up my own mind.

The general consensus is that a 40wt oil will shear down to a 30wt in about 2-3,000mi. If your fine with that, then run it longer. If your not, change it more routinely.
 

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I paid $40 in Kalifornia for 2.1 US Quarts of Motul 7100 10W40 100% full synthetic. $25 to fill up on 91 octane at $6.7/US gallon. So in my case fuel is still cheaper. :ROFLMAO:
Save yourself some money on both. Use Rotella T6 at $23.00 for a gallon oil. Fill your bike with 87 octane. Your bike does not need 91.
 

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Save yourself some money on both. Use Rotella T6 at $23.00 for a gallon oil. Fill your bike with 87 octane. Your bike does not need 91.
Better yet, supertech will do @ $23 for 2 gallons of 15w-40 :ROFLMAO:

Here was a good episode on Engine Masters that might change your mind about running high octane fuel.
I agree, the klr doesn’t need friggin 91 octane pump gas IMO. It’s a low powered/low rpm’d tractor engine that’ll run just fine on even 85 octane fuel.

 

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Only non-corn contaminated fuel for me which means 91. I'll never run ethanol in my KLRs again.
Wish we had that option, but non-ethanol fuel is very hard to find here in Commiefornia.
I did see non-ethanol 91 gas at a station in Minden NV when I rode there last month.
If you burn it quick (like I do), ethanol gas is okay for the most part. Let it sit and your screwed. I still add a bottle of seafoam to my tank every 3k mi.
 
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Here in Iowa, there are still a few places that run non ethanol 87. Usually you have to buy 91 for non ethanal. I'm not worried about 87, but no ethanol for me. Ethanol is very hard on aluminum. Especially if you have to store the bike. Youtube channel Project Farm did a good video on ethanol and aluminum. He does comparison tests of anything that is requested by his viewers. There is a ton of good info on his channel.
 

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Only non-corn contaminated fuel for me which means 91. I'll never run ethanol in my KLRs again.
Ethanol is bad for any rubber hoses, gaskets, and seals. An old timer I worked with that rebuilt plenty of car motors in his time claimed rotted hoses and vacuum lines were rare, but began happening when ethanol was introduced. At work I've cleaned countless carburetors for Pacer pumps which all had nothing but 87 10% ethanol (recently raised to 15% via Joe Potato Biden) and they're always full of gunk and sometimes gel. Ethanol pulls moisture out of the air also-some bowls I've taken off were nearly a quarter full of water. It's terrible in stuff that'll sit most of the time. Disturbingly, some countries have even banned the sale of non-ethanol fuel and there are youtube channels of ingenious gearheads that distill the ethanol out for their classic cars/bikes using clear jugs and sunlight. It's only going to get worse folks unless we start pushing back against communism using environmentalism as a smokescreen.
 
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