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Tom, if that wire inhibits the anti kickback at low RPM, that very likely explains why Vern can’t kickstart it. I doubt even the most vigorous kicker can get the engine turning at 200RPM.
The anti-kickback inhibits spark at less than 200rpm. That is, at less than 200rpm there is no spark produced - no spark, no kickback. About four years back we sorta figured out that the threshold on the Gen 2 was ~200rpm and that defeating the anti-kickback was what that wire did on the Gen 2. Now, if the wire inhibits that function when it is energized, then it is allowing spark at less than 200rpm.

The case here is the similar wire on the Gen 1 that was added to the A4 and up. It does something, we just don't know for certain what it does. It has been put forth, without explanation, documentation, or proof, that it retards the spark. It has been put forth that it is also used to defeat an anti-kickback feature. This is kinda-sorta questionable since a fair number of Gen 1 KLRs have had kick-starters added with no trouble related to an anti-kickback feature. It may be, however, that the anti-kickback occurs at a higher rpm on the Gen 1. I never did any testing of the wire's function on the Gen 1.
 

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OK, you have a fuel-air mixture in the form of gas and air or starting fluid. You've got a spark. The design of the engine is such that the spark can only happen at the right time in terms of BTDC. It is a wasted spark, so there is a spark every 360*, so you can't be off by a revolution. You seem to have compression, and you should have compression on a new top-end build. Your foot bears witness to that.

Hard starting is often a symptom of tight valves. Yeah, I know. It might be worth checking the valve timing and the valve lash again, just to put it in the "That ain't the problem column".

Everything I ever needed to really know about Systems Engineering I learned at the age of 15 from Ferd in one afternoon. Ferd went to China with Nixon and oversaw the comms and comms satellite set up - he worked for Hughes Space and Comm. I rode my bicycle over to his house to seek his advice, as I couldn't get my car to start after a rebuild. I told him that yeah, I had a spark. Yeah, I had fuel. Yeah, compression, yeah, timing, yeah, valves adjusted. He told me to get the hell off his porch and go home and shut my car off before it overheated in the driveway. Then he lit a Camel and slammed the door in my face.

Let's make a list and be sure of it.
I trust you when you say you have spark, though I haven't yet asked if you have grabbed a hold of the bare secondary when it is turning over. I haven't done that because I know how hard it is to hold the secondary wire and kick the thing over. A studious student would have some way of seeing the spark and then turn the engine over with a half-inch drill motor sorta like this;
I did it with this device simply because a video of me holding the wire and screaming in pain at 1.67Hz was a bit too graphic... Like I say, I trust you when you say you have spark.

Your spark timing is correct because there is no other way for it to be. If you didn't have a Gen 1 rotor installed, that would be a problem. If you had somehow managed to install an '84 KLR600 rotor, that would be a problem.

You have fuel and air because you have a carburetor that air comes through and carries fuel into the combustion chamber. You've said that you've seen a wet spark plug and that it might even be flooded. You've also tried starting fluid. Under the right conditions, that stuff oughta catch fire.

You have compression because your foot hurts. Kicking it 10 times in tennies will do that.

I grant that there may be something I am not seeing or thinking of, but it seems like Ferd was right.

The only thing I can suggest is to check the valve timing and the valve lash. Make sure the mark you see on the rotor is the "T" and make sure that the valve lash is in the .008" range.
 

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though I haven't yet asked if you have grabbed a hold of the bare primary when it is turning over. I haven't done that because I know how hard it is to hold the primary wire and kick the thing over.
I believe that needs a couple of edits, Tom. The spark comes out of the Secondary coil wire.

Also, up above you inquired about the connections of the Yel/Blk and the Blk/Yel primary wires of the CDI unit, correct?

Your sparking video has a note about a Yel/Red wire. Kind of nit picking, I know.
 

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I have a stripped threaded hole for my valve cover bolt. This seems to be a somewhat common issue. I remember years back that I accidentally had the wrong setting on my torque wrench and this must have been the bolt. I remember that dreaded feeling and then just left it tightened in there as is.

Right now I plan on using a helicoil to fix it which seemed to work for others on this thread.

Same troublesome bolt hole in the front right of the head as the other poster. I was going to torque to 69in/lbs per the torque sheet on this forum.

View attachment 27894


The rest is moving right along. Oil mod banjo bolts, first gen flywheel and stator are installed. The valves are well within spec and I set up the MC mod to try.

Just waiting on a couple small oem parts, the powder coating from the shop and the Cogent Moab to arrive.

View attachment 27895

View attachment 27896

View attachment 27897
I may have spotted the potential problem. Note the KLR600 OUTER flywheel cover (2 bumps for screws) & the placement of the pick-up coil at the 8:00 position of the cover in the 3rd & 4th pics.

Did you also use a KLR600 FLYWHEEL or did you use a Gen 1 KLR650 flywheel? Are the timing strips of the 2 flywheels in the same location Tom Schmitz?
 

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Discussion Starter #205
I may have spotted the potential problem. Note the KLR600 OUTER flywheel cover (2 bumps for screws) & the placement of the pick-up coil at the 8:00 position of the cover in the 3rd & 4th pics.

Did you also use a KLR600 FLYWHEEL or did you use a Gen 1 KLR650 flywheel? Are the timing strips of the 2 flywheels in the same location Tom Schmitz?
Holy crap! That could be it. I'll see if I can get to it tonight. Gen 1 flywheel. Just used the cover for aesthetics.
 

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I believe that needs a couple of edits, Tom. The spark comes out of the Secondary coil wire.

Also, up above you inquired about the connections of the Yel/Blk and the Blk/Yel primary wires of the CDI unit, correct?

Your sparking video has a note about a Yel/Red wire. Kind of nit picking, I know.
Thanks for catching the primary/secondary issue, Paul. Corrected.

On the Gen 1, the wire in question is Y/Bk. On the Gen 2, it is Y/R. The video was done on the Gen 2.
 

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It was only the '84 KLR600 that had an inner and outer alternator cover that differed from the subsequent KLR650 covers, and the pick-up location was different. Thus, as @pdwestman notes, the reluctor bar on the rotor is in a different location and is incompatible with anything but the '84. It cannot be made to work with any later engine. And, this is why I said "If you had somehow managed to install an '84 KLR600 rotor, that would be a problem ."

To the best of my knowledge, the pick-up coil location in the alternator cover and the reluctor strip locations on the rotor, are the same and interchangeable from '85 to '07. In the notes, Josh said he was using, '97 stator, '03 flywheel, '94 cdi, and an '05 ignition coil. Those should play well together.

I am not using a two-bump cover; mine is a mid-Gen 1 cover. Still, it would be worth the effort to at least do a comparison of the 600 cover and the Gen 2 cover to try and determine if there is any difference in pick-up coil location

I think we are on the right track, going back and looking at basics. It seems all of the elements are there but just not happening at the right time.
 
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