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By the way, Al Yankovic and I went to the same school at the same time. We never crossed paths and I never listened to the campus radio station, so I never listened to him. I didn't find any of this out until 20 years later.

That is as close as I have ever come to knowing someone famous.
 

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...I got my bent form previous owner with lowering links kickstand off. It looks like I will only save 4 oz if I put on one of those expensive Soupy aluminum stands assuming they were accurate when they messaged me back saying it weighed 1lb. The bolt was mutilated which I assumed was from them. I would love some recommendations for a side stand...
Buy a new kickstand (because that one is AFU) and shorten it (if required) as @campfire would:

You'll probably chop close to 4 ounces out of it...
Grind the backside of the foot off so that it can't ever dig a groove in the swingarm.
Good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #83
After minutes of haphazard consideration I have decided to swap the KLR600 transmission into my current engine. The 16T countershaft sprockets with screw holes are still available and the 600 bottom end I purchased seems to be in pretty good shape. I don't know if it was ever opened up and the countershaft sprocket is possibly original and in decent shape which could mean less miles I guess. This will also allow me to split my cases and learn about the inner workings first hand.

A budget friendly engine stand would be really nice as well (if they exist). I have a non running Yamaha TX750 that I will have to learn how to work on after this. It needs an adjustable balancer kit installed in it. If anyone uses a motor stand and has any experience or tips let me know. I have learned so much already and this has been really fun for the most part. I can then do most of the stressful detail work in my air conditioned bedroom instead of the messy very very very hot Florida garage. I wheeled the entire motorcycle into my bedroom 10 years ago when I had to install the 685 kit. Walk around the opened up bike to hop into bed.

Maybe I will come to my senses and just get this thing back on the road but for now I like to make things difficult for myself. Winter is the best time to ride in Florida anyway. No riding season here.
 

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Yes, I did remove the KACR at one point. It was not a good idea. The thing is there for a reason. A thorough inspection from time to time to make sure it is in good shape is all that is needed to prevent it from causing any problems. With that, it will solve far more problems than it creates.

The KLR is not a beast t kick over, but it is a big thumper and it can bite. It doesn't need a lot of compression to start (hardly any engine does, not even those nasty spring-start .049 WEN-MACs, and they will take your finger), so why kick against compression that you don't have to?

Even with mine being somewhat higher than normal in compression ratio, the KACR almost let me get away with kicking it without boots on.

Almost.

Keep the KACR. Check the KACR. Thank the KACR. Sing its praises.
 

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Whether one runs a 14, 15, 16 or even a 17 tooth front sprocket, it could be a Very Good Idea to run the alternator & ignition wires Straight UP from the rubber grommets (if the wires are flexible enough) to get those bloody wires out from directly in-front of the drive chain and sprocket.
Gravelly mud can get Jammed into that area and destroy the wires, much less a failed chain.

One can Dermel Tool a hole in the top LH corner of the 'square section' of the sprocket cover to let the wires out. And another hole just ahead of the transmission oil banjo bolt to let the wires back In Behind the cover.
The neutral light wire should be removed from the wire sheathing near the banjo bolt so as to allow it to still route straight down thru the channel in the main engine case.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
Yes, KACR. That is what I meant. It shall remain. I had to look up 049 WEN-MAC. I had access to something like that as well when I was young. I wonder if it was my dads are my much older sisters. I remember getting whacked. Builds character.

It is a funny design with the wires right there. I could even run the wires right up and out of the starter hole before I plug it. I am pulling a starter gears and the sprag clutch so they wouldn't get chewed up since they are routed around the rotor with the guides. Nice and clean. The neutral wire will be pulled.

Another thing I was curious about is hooking up the vapor temp gauge wire to the water sensor plug in the head. I saw someone do that somewhere. Seems like a good idea if it works and maybe save some money if you don't buy the "KLR KIT" for the vapor. Keeps you from cutting your coolant line as well. Anyone have any experience with that?
 

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After minutes of haphazard consideration I have decided...
I approve of this technique; it is one I am wont to employ.

My KLR has Trail Tech sensor in the head.

The OEM sensor is a taper-thread body, as the Japanese like to use the British Standard Pipe Taper (BSPT) threading, which is head-explody stuff to me. The OEM threading is 1/8"-28 BSPT. Trail Tech only sell a British Standard Parallel Pipe (BSPP) sensor, but the BSPT and the BSPP are both 28 threads-per-inch.

BSPT seals on the tapered thread, just like the American NPT threads do. BSPP seals with a soft ring against a spotface, just like a banjo bolt does.

Why don't Trail Tech sell a BSPT temperature sensor? IONO, why don't they ship the Vapor with a resistor lead? Bakatare.

If you put some pipe dope on the sensor and start it very carefully and thread it in and snug it up it will work just fine. The important part is getting it started right which is a bit tricky as the threads at the top of the hole are a bit oversize for the BSPP; easy to cross-thread. This is one of those applications where you should sacrifice a wrench to make something similar to a flare-nut wrench, but 12-point rather than 6, as shown in this artist's rendering of an actual wrench that actually exists but, actually, I can't find it right now and I never took an actual picture of it, so I had to make this actual fake picture.
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Better, but requiring a spot facing tool and a 1/8"-28 BSPP tap, is to spot face and tap it properly to 1/8"-28 BSPP. The head has to be off. The tap is no problem, but the spotfacing is unless the head is on a machine table such that you can do the tapping and spotfacing as subsequent operations in a drill press or vertical mill so that the spot face is perfectly perpendicular to the tapped hole. Won't seal otherwise.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
Hmmmm. I was originally under the impression that they just stuck the wire onto the OEM sensor and it worked. Seems worthwhile to pull it out and replace. I wonder if the vapor unit could read off of the OEM. I have mine in the spot of the thermobob 1 I pulled for the Tbob2. The coolant line is a little tight so it best practice to replace it and stick the sensor in the head.
 

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Hmmmm. I was originally under the impression that they just stuck the wire onto the OEM sensor and it worked.
Maybe, but . . . I doubt it. Electrical compatibility arises as an issue, I imagine.

The OEM temperature gauge essentially is a VOLTMETER reading the voltage across a resistor (immersed in coolant) whose value varies with temperature. IF the Trail Tech temperature gauge arrangement uses the same scale values (resistance-vs.-temperature calibration, gauge (voltmeter) sensitivity, etc.), then the Trail Tech temperature gauge might be, simply, "Plug 'n' play;" just connect the existing single wire of the OEM temperature sensor (the temperature-sensitive resistor) to the Trail Tech gadget and you're in business. "Best of all possible worlds," seldom happens, in my experience.

DISCLAIMER: Postulations from unverified wiring diagram examination only; no hands-on experience involved. Correction/clarification welcomed.
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Putting this here as a reminder.

You have a 2008 right? While you're in there you should carefully inspect the upper balancer bearings. On my 2008 one failed at 36k miles, resulting in a cracked case. I should have changed them when i rebuilt my crankshaft :(

Unfortunately to change them you need to split the case. If you ever need to do that then you can deal with that screw.

These lower bearings almost never fail. Never heard of one.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
I just had my mind blown. I was struggling getting the primary/oil pump gear nut off the unmounted KLR600 engine last night and I ended up picking this stuff up today. I know this is basics to a lot of you guys but this is my first time using an impact wrench. I have to pull apart the KLR600 bottom end, my main KLR650 engine, rebuild the Yamaha TX750 and have a 2005 Toyota Tacoma and 2000 Toyota Avalon to keep alive for as longs as possible so I figured it would get some more use. I also learned the difference between impact sockets and exploding regular sockets on impact wrenches.

This Harbor Freight coupon site is helpful. All you have to do is screen shot the coupon and show it to them on your phone. Click on browse all coupons or just use the 20% on the homepage if that is all you need.


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This engine stand is the next purchase. You just need to make some basic brackets for mounting.

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Hmmmm. I was originally under the impression that they just stuck the wire onto the OEM sensor and it worked. Seems worthwhile to pull it out and replace. I wonder if the vapor unit could read off of the OEM. I have mine in the spot of the thermobob 1 I pulled for the Tbob2. The coolant line is a little tight so it best practice to replace it and stick the sensor in the head.
The OEM sensor is a single conductor with the body of the sensor being the ground connection. The Trail Tech sensor is a two-wire sensor, so it is set up with a ground internal to whatever it gets plugged into.

Trail Tech use the same sensor for all their units, which range from single thermometers with internal batteries, to the multi-function units like the Vapor, which are usually externally wired. Thus the two-wire get-up.

I'll have to check the resistance of both at ambient and tapwater-hot to see if they are anywhere close to interchangeable. Provided I can find an OEM sensor in the Shop of Horrors, I could do that tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
I should have worded that better. I didn't realize they extracted and installed the trailtech part if that is what they did. I don't recall where I first saw it but it was only a single photo. It will be a while before mine is back up and running with the harness pulled and everything down the pipe.
 

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The OEM sensor acts a bit goofy; its resistance measurement is not very stable; might be an
RTD rather than a thermistor. At ambient of 79°F it read in a range of 380-412Ω and the gauge displayed 450°F. The Trail Tech sensor measured a solid 96Ω and the gauge displayed 79°F.

At 96°F, the Trail Tech sensor measured 68Ω and displayed 96°F. The OEM sensor measured ~260Ω and displayed 520°F.
 
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Discussion Starter #96
Thanks for all the info and hard work.

I split the 600 case tonight. The doohickey spring tension was still there and working. They never should have changed. The doohickey itself is laughable. Transmission is out. I had to heat up the primary drive gear to get it loose.

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The SUPER Light tension of the KL600 & early KL650 doo-hickey tensioner springs REALLY Needed to have the warning about turning the crankshaft CCW to TDC to Prevent actually Adding Slack to the balancer system during attempted adjustment.
When attempted adjustment was performed Properly, that very light spring had enough TRAVEL to do its job for a very long time. But ANY over-torqueing of the locking bolt would De-form the doo-hickey and render the system in-operable.
In my opinion, this Lack of Information in the service manuals was the Real Reason the this system developed a bad reputation for many failures.

I can see numerous 'pinch marks' on that original doo-hickey in the plastic bag from over-torqueing, so the previous owner(s) got lucky that they weren't even deeper.
 

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My 1987 doo-hickey was identical, except my last re-torque mark was TOO Tight (pinch-mark) and it could no-longer slide past the locking bolt. Even my semi-educated hand over torqued it at about 50,000 mile mark as I remember.

A word of warning, the Adjuster Sprockets & backside Spacers are Different Thicknesses between these early engines and the 1996 & up engines. They do NOT interchange.
 

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Discussion Starter #100
Getting ready for the next steps. I pulled everything out of the KLR600 bottom end that I may need. I went back and test fit the transmission in it a couple times for practice so I am comfortable when I am working in my engine.

I am now thinking of what I should do with the head gaskets. I have the 685 kit installed from 10 years ago. I think they are from Schnitz and I have read that the OEM cut to size are best. I just wanted to get the groups expert opinion. I plan on reusing my side case/water pump gaskets since I just put them when I rebuilt from the impeller shaft replacement (0 miles ago). I am putting on new exhaust and cam chain tensioner gaskets.

This is the gasket maker I have. I need to use it for sealing up the case. Is this preferable or is there something better out there.
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Oh, wait, one more thing! (Lt. Columbo mode)

I was looking back over your posts are realized you've got an '08.

Some of those had a problem with hard starting due to low compression from an over-active KACR - it lifted the valve too much and the starting compression was lowered to the point where the thing was grumpy about starting. The fix from Kawasaki was to grind a bit off of the pin so that the KACR would not open the exhaust valve quite so much, resulting in a higher starting compression..

You may have one of those, thus the low compression number. Has it ever been hard to start?

Food for thought...

T
I found this today. Is there a way to measure or visually inspect the KACR? Mine wouldn't be overly grumpy to start but there were times it would turn over quite a few time to start. It didn't seem out of the ordinary to me but I have no experience to judge otherwise. I suppose I could just inspect and carefully grind it down a little since I am going to kickstart only.


Got my clutch arm back from Twin Headlight Ernie today.
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Here is a fun video I watched today.
 
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