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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone, again!
I think I decided to go with the Shinko 244s this time. Mainly because of the cheaper price and pretty decent reviews from people. Even though I have to buy tubes with it. I will most likely try out the Shinko 705s sometime too. It is a 2008 KLR.

My question is, is it a good idea for me to change the tire (never have before) or should I have the local shop do it? Is there anything I could mess up?

Thanks again.
 

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Worse case you bang up your knuckles and pinch a tube. First time wasn't fun and had to re-do it the next day because i found out the tube got pinched. Getting a new tire off was almost as bad as getting it on.

Doing it yourself really depends on how you feel about doing it for starters. If you are confident that you can then go for it. Otherwise have it done. It is a good thing to know how to do though.

Check your local shop for price of mounting. I have a GoldWing 1500 and I was all set to remove the back wheel to get a tire replaced. That is not an easy job on that bike. I phoned the dealership and for $70 they will remove the wheel, mount and balance the tire, lube the splines and check the brakes and bearings. Not worth me busting my knuckles for $70.
 

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This will give you a general idea of what is involved, when you don't have a full tire shop of equipment to perform the task. Search youtube for other tire changing videos to get an idea of what you are up against. I don't find it to be a problem, like removing my own kidney or writing piano concertos. A 2 x 2 piece of lumber, cut to length, will suffice for a jack. An inexpensive 12V air compressor from Wally World, Advance Auto Parts, etc will be all the air supply you need. Three tire spoons, 8 to 11 inches long are all you need for tire irons / spoons. A valve core removal tool. A bottle of talcum powder. Cell phone speed dial set to Dial-A-Prayer. A little dish soap.

Successful tire repair is not about strength. It is about method. It is an acquired skill, much like fly fishing. There are certain movements you perfect, details you focus on. The biggest obstacle in tire changing is dealing with your own frustration. Knowing that up front, allow time, accept you will get dirty, ask questions. Like fishing, we will all have our own techniques, tolerance for disappointments, and willingness to stick with it till we get it right.

One of the most unique qualities of this bike is that there is very little you cannot do to it maintenance wise ourselves.
 

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That's the most flexible tire I've ever seen!

Yea tire changing is technique but you won't put a Maxxis Desert tire on a rim that easy believe me! Funny the way he just pops the bead loose almost like it was just put on, hmm....
 

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That's one thing to be aware of when watching these videos. Most are made for a dirt bike tire which generally have softer sidewalls than a DOT approved tire that you would mount on a KLR.
 

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I'm no mechanic but I was able to change my tires with out TOO much trouble. I watched a U-tube video 3 times, bought a set of spoons and went at it. The first time took 40 min, the second time (I put the rear tire on backwards) took 25 min. I wasn't rushing and the times listed are from wheel on the bike to wheel on the bike. Good luck and enjoy your bike.
 
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