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Has anyone converted the spoked rims to tubeless with success? I was unable to get a tire on the rim using tire irons in my garage without pinching the tube. After the sixth pinch and two tubes I took it to a shop. I started thinking if I am unable to do this at home, there is no way I would be able to do it on the trail somewhere in the middle of nowhere, alone. That is why I am considering the change. Thanks for any opinions/suggestions.
 

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People have done it, but I wouldn't recommend it in your case. The way you ride you'd have them all bent up in no time. Dual sports and off-road bikes have spoked rims because they are stronger than alloy wheels.

Tire changing is all about technique. It is 95% technique and 5% tools and lubricant. Unfortunately, the only way to get good at it is to practice.

Some tires and tubes are harder to deal with than others because they are stiff/thick. You might want to try the zip-tie method. I think it was the vintage car (Model T vintage) people that came up with the idea. It can be helpful; I have found that it helps keep the tube stuffed away out of harm's way. As far as getting the tire on the rim, it might be marginally easier.
 
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Has anyone converted the spoked rims to tubeless with success? I was unable to get a tire on the rim using tire irons in my garage without pinching the tube. After the sixth pinch and two tubes I took it to a shop. I started thinking if I am unable to do this at home, there is no way I would be able to do it on the trail somewhere in the middle of nowhere, alone. That is why I am considering the change. Thanks for any opinions/suggestions.
On youtube bestrest, the cycle pump guy. Has a detailed video on sealing laced wheels for going tubeless. I have considered it but then I dont do any serious off road riding either.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Ditto on Tom's comments; if you have trouble installing a tubed tire, you reeeaaly won't like trying to re-seat a tubeless tire on a rim in the field. Spoked wheels are used on every real dirt bike and all dirt oriented dual sport/dual purpose and ADV bikes for good reason. While you can convert a tube type spoked wheel to a tube-less setup, the issues dealing with re-seating and maintaining the seal make it a poor idea IMO.

Tubes are simple and easy; while it isn't my favorite task, it gets pretty easy after the first 100 or so! LOL....all technique as Tom said.

The Tubliss system may be the best of both worlds but it isn't recommended for highway use and they don't make them in 17".......which is why I just purchased two 18" Excel rims, spoke kits and hubs to make my own KLR Tubliss setup.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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This KLR is my first ever changing MC tires. I’ve done both front and rear twice so far with little trouble and no tube pinch.
I wonder, did you air up the tube a bit so it expands into the tire some once the tire is about 1/2 on the rim? That gets rid of the “folds” in the tube which otherwise lay there at the rim where you don’t want it. I’m sure I would have pinched it if I’d not done that. I left the valve core out the entire time, so then air will leave it while setting the rest of the tire.
 

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...you reeeaaly won't like trying to re-seat a tubeless tire on a rim in the field...
Aw, heck, Dave, that's what lighter fluid and matches is for.
 
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I'll suggest Starter Fluid. I would want to 'pop' them on there, not just light them on fire!

Do it with the Valve Core Removed! I've had tires get sucked right back off the beads because of the vacuum created when too much is used and the fire burns out/cools down inside.
 

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Thanks gentlemen. I appreciate the time taken to reply. Practice the technique sounds good to me.
Tips;

Get good tire irons that do NOT have sharp ends. I have a long set of motion pro's.
use a HD tube (thicker tubes are harder to pinch)
use WD40, talcum powder or specialty product to help everything move more easily
remember that the opposing bead must be completely in the center of the rim when you're using the irons/spoons.
Having a stand can help, even if it's just a 5 gall bucket

You can also try the zap strap method (search on youtube); it can make life easier - particularly for the less experienced

.....and remember that if it's taking too much effort, you're doing it wrong. Practice does make it quicker and easier though it never just falls into place! We had competitions at our races to see how fast someone could change a tire - lots of guys in at the 2-3 minute range. There are also all kinds of nifty tire tools like the Motion Pro Bead Buddy and the Baja No Pinch Tire tool.......I have the Bead Buddies and have tried the Baja tool but I find I like my old school methods best - you might prefer them though.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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Ditto on Tom's comments; if you have trouble installing a tubed tire, you reeeaaly won't like trying to re-seat a tubeless tire on a rim in the field. Spoked wheels are used on every real dirt bike and all dirt oriented dual sport/dual purpose and ADV bikes for good reason. While you can convert a tube type spoked wheel to a tube-less setup, the issues dealing with re-seating and maintaining the seal make it a poor idea IMO.

Tubes are simple and easy; while it isn't my favorite task, it gets pretty easy after the first 100 or so! LOL....all technique as Tom said.

The Tubliss system may be the best of both worlds but it isn't recommended for highway use and they don't make them in 17".......which is why I just purchased two 18" Excel rims, spoke kits and hubs to make my own KLR Tubliss setup.

Cheers,
Dave
I have never needed to reseat a tubeless tire in the field. Simply insert the plugs and pump some air back in and get on your way. :grin2:
 

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The Rear wheel of a KLR650 has the safety bead ridges which causes a tubeless capable rear tire to 'snap-on' tightly. It is why many people 'fight' to break the beads down on the rear wheels during tire changing.

The Front wheel of a KLR650 is of original 'Tube Type' design. Therefore once flattened the beads usually un-seat themselves almost instantly. Will probably need to use a tow rope / tow strap or 2 tie-down straps to go around the tread and force the beads to retain air until re-seated.

But IME, 90% of all motorcycle flats from nails, screws, wire & glass are on the rear tires. The front tire clips the offending object, stands it up & the rear tire gets speared by it!
 

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I think, to @Voyager's point, that it would be unusual for the bead to pop off of a tubeless rim under normal circumstances, so it ought to be a plug 'n go routine.

Except in cases like @beamwalker's where he rides willy-nilly over baby heads, careens down rocky slopes, does water crossings at maximum grunt and generally rides the thing like a 250 hooner. With use like that, a cast tubless wheel will eventually get bent up and the likelihood of bead popping off the rim is increased.

But then, again, that's what lighter fluid and matches are for.
 

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I think, to @Voyager's point, that it would be unusual for the bead to pop off of a tubeless rim under normal circumstances, so it ought to be a plug 'n go routine.

Except in cases like @beamwalker's where he rides willy-nilly over baby heads, careens down rocky slopes, does water crossings at maximum grunt and generally rides the thing like a 250 hooner. With use like that, a cast tubless wheel will eventually get bent up and the likelihood of bead popping off the rim is increased.

But then, again, that's what lighter fluid and matches are for.
...I dunno; most times I've gotten a flat offroad (except on my KTM with Tubliss), the bead has come unseated. Maybe you guys are just luckier than I am....


Dave
 

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My experience is front, yes, rear, no.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
"Willy-nilly" huh Tom? Hehehehe. Thanks fellas. I will stay with tubes and technique. Hopefully I will not have to do a "field" repair 30 miles from help, but I imagine it is inevitable so practice the technique and remember that it is a 650, not the 250 my mind thinks it is until I go down and I have to pick up the heavy beast. I am on my second set of tires with just over 10,000 miles since last April, I ran a set for about 2,000 then went more aggressive , Shinko 705 to 700, now using 804,805 and like them. All that was said to ask what is the average mileage you guys get on a set of tires? I am looking forward to a trip in the next couple of months Tom. Hope you've been keeping up on your dominoes game mister.
 
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