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Discussion Starter #1
Was in the process of transferring some brand-new Continental Trail Attack tires to a KLRista; when he discovered the tires were TUBELESS, he ran, screaming, from the room!

Said he would procure some tube-type tires, instead.

To each his own; I considered tubeless tires, with inner tubes, less likely to shed their rims than tube-type tires, because of the bead construction.

So, what say ye, o knowledgeable motorcycle aficionados? Was my prospective customer wise in his choice? Must I EAT these tubeless tires, unless I can find a BMW rider who wants them?
 

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I agree with you; as you know there is no problem running tubeless tires (with tubes, of course) on tube type rims. They tend to fit a bit tighter and can be a bit harder to install/break the bead.....but no other disadvantage that I'm aware of and they SHOULD stay on the bead better in the event of low pressure. I think your customer is just ill-informed.

As far as running tube-less goes; I'm happy my bikes have tubes: it might be harder to install a new tube vs. stuff in a plug but if you have damage that a plug isn't going to fix, you're screwed......plus if you've ever tried to reseat a tubeless tire with a hand pump or a little 12V compressor, you're in for a treat!

Dave
 

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Damocles,
I don't know about the original "Trail Attack's", but the currently available Trail Attack 2's are only available as TL (Tubeless).
So I'll also suggest an ill-informed customer.
And I also like the tighter fitting beads of a TL tire on my inner tube equipped KLR.
 

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The stock KLR rims aren't designed to run tubeless. The tires won't care, but they lack of a safety bead seat will. The inflated tube on a tubeless tire is what presses, and holds, the tire on the bead.


Don't flame me if there are models that do have safest rims, but my '03 sure doesn't.
 

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shinyribs,
Have you had your rear tire off yet?

The rear rim of all the stock and standard KLR650's that I have changed tires on are of the TubeLess safety bead design. (But we do have 36 leaky spokes. this info for the noobs.)

The front rim does Not have the safety bead design.

The standard OEM TubeType Tires have the typical loose fitting tube type Beads. They will almost "self-dismount" when one has a flat! Can be very Scarey!

A Tubeless Rear Avon Gripster, Kenda K761 or Shinko E705 will snap-on tight enough to make many home mechanics cuss when they finally wear out or do get a flat.

A Tubeless Front tire used on the front KLR rim is barely snugger that any Tube Type tire.
 

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It is perfectly fine to run tubes in tubeless tires Damoclese. Here is a quote from Continental's site:
All TL/TT-sidewalled tyres can be used with a tube without decreasing the speed range (except Z rated radials).
ALL Continental tyres labelled TL can be fitted to rims/wheels marked Tubeless. They can also be fitted on Tubed Type rims/wheels with a correctly sized Continental inner tube.
Here is the link to the page quoted from:
Technical Information | Continental
So tube type can be run with tubes no problem!
Go collect your money.....JJ
 

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shinyribs,
Have you had your rear tire off yet?

The rear rim of all the stock and standard KLR650's that I have changed tires on are of the TubeLess safety bead design. (But we do have 36 leaky spokes. this info for the noobs.)

The front rim does Not have the safety bead design.

The standard OEM TubeType Tires have the typical loose fitting tube type Beads. They will almost "self-dismount" when one has a flat! Can be very Scarey!

A Tubeless Rear Avon Gripster, Kenda K761 or Shinko E705 will snap-on tight enough to make many home mechanics cuss when they finally wear out or do get a flat.

A Tubeless Front tire used on the front KLR rim is barely snugger that any Tube Type tire.
I did put new tires on my bike when I got it. I did the front tire while a buddy changed the rear. By the time I got the front tire off and saw no safety beads my buddy already had the rear back together. I was surprised to see no safety beads, so I asked him about the rear. He thought for a second, then said " I don't think it did..." I figured it was safe to assume that rear didn't, since they didn't put one up front. I wonder why they did that?


You mentioned " leaky 36 spokes". Is there a reason that a rim with 36 spokes is prone to leak vs a rim with 38 or 40 spokes?
 

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How timely.

I just received a set of K60 Scouts. The rear is tubeless.

I'm having an absolute bear of a time reseating the bead. I've lubed, pried, bounced, and pounded the tire to no avail. The problem areas only rotate to another part of the rim. Airing down and reinflating several times didn't help, either.

I'm going to have to take it to a tire shop and have them lube it up and "super inflate" it. My small compressor just can't get the pressure high enough to force the bead into place.

I'll also have to track down a 2 oz spoke wheel weight. I only ordered a few small ones and, although they'll slow down the rotation on a static balancer, they don't stop the oscillations entirely. Think a nearby Harley shop would have some?
 

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I've owned Harley's and they have spoke weights. Just bring it to them and they can finish the job...albeit maybe not cheap.
 

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I had a quad tire recently that didn't want to bead. I finally found silicone spray lube worked to get it to snap on. How high did you go on pressure?
For the balance. You cant balance anythig till the tire is properly seated on the bead. The balance can change drastically when the tire seats .
JJ
 

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Discussion Starter #13
CAUTION: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!

I've personally witnessed a tire bead set with . . . STARTING FLUID!

Kinda scary, but . . . WORKED! :)
 

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It doesn't matter what you use to generate the pressure, be it an air compressor or an exploding flammable liquid it still takes the same pressure to seat the bead on the rim. The DANGER with the flammable liquid is you have no way to control the amount of pressure in the tire once you ignite it. At least if you use a compressor and a remote fill chuck and hose, you don't have to be near it if the tire explodes. You need to pay attention to the max fill pressure and not exceed it. Also do not be hanging over the tire and rim while filling it.
JJ
 

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I'll second what Damocles said due to liability issues with giving potentially bad advice.

I use hairspray on the tires for frankentractor, have in the past on both Harleys, and FOOM!, seated.
Deflate, refilled with air to chosen pressure.

A correct and much safer alternative is to use a ratchet type strap around the centerline of the tire.
Cranking it tight will compress the center and spread out the bead closer or even touching the rim all
the way around. If you have an air can, fill it to get VOLUME RUSH rather than total pressure available
from the mini's.
 

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I've owned Harley's and they have spoke weights. Just bring it to them and they can finish the job...albeit maybe not cheap.
I spoke with them earlier. The service guy actually had the gall to tell me that their "equipment" would only work with Harley rims.

I couldn't contain my laughter.

Anyway, I suppose their shop is too good for Kawis.
 

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Update: A friendly garage with a beefier compressor added air until it seated. I didn't want to know how much they had to add. I only asked that it be aired back down to 36 psi when they were done. LOL. Once it was seated, it only took 1/2 ounce of weight to balance. So, being off the bead must greatly affect the balance. So, boys and girls, don't try to balance until after you have the tire correctly mounted.

I also managed to get the front tire replaced. It took some air, but it was within my tiny compressor's ability.

However, I discovered that *all 4* front axle clamp bolts were missing. Judging from the amount of dirt, they fell out some time ago. Since the bike is just over two months old, I'm hoping my local dealer makes it right, but I suspect that I'll be shelling out a few bucks and waiting a week to ten days before they arrive.

If you'll remember, I had issues with them after the sell...QA related.

http://www.klrforum.com/klr-other-motorcycle-related-discussion/55089-closed-my-klr-nightmare-experience-inside.html

PS: Sorry if I hijacked the thread. I just didn't think that my issues warranted a new one.
 

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subvetssn,
Those 4 axle clamp bolts on a Gen 2 KLR must be loosened to remove the front axle, when Un-crating a new KLR. (Front wheel is OFF.)
So they must be re-tightened by the 'mechanic' performing the initial assembly.
So the dealership OWES you the customer, 4 new bolts, out of their own pockets! Kawasaki Should Back-charge them for those bolts if they are Stupid Enough to submit a Warranty Claim!
 

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Update: Based on my previous "discussions" with the owner of the dealership, I contacted him directly. The local branch removed the 4 bolts from a KLR on the floor and gave them to me, no questions asked.

One of the "mechanics" who was involved with the predelivery inspection tried to be jovial and asked, "What was up?". I told him that I was missing some bolts then, used my toe to point out which ones. I suspect he feared me exploding because he didn't say another word and promptly returned to the shop area.

The young guy behind the parts counter gave me the bolts and suggested that I use Loctite to keep them in place. I was tempted to ask if, in his infinite wisdom, that was company policy and something that he had also passed onto his installers, but thought better of it. I just wanted my bolts and to get out of there.
 
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