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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently did a valve job and installed a tusk cover gasket. Upon receiving it, I noticed it looked less robust than the one previously installed in terms of its dimensions, and I also found a nice sized nic out of the gasket itself. It looked like its from the manufacturing process where I'd assume they have multiple gaskets attached in a mold. anyways they didn't do a good job cutting them apart and instead took a chunk out of the gasket. it looked like the nic might nit leak, so I installed the gasket anyways.

I dont think the nic is causing the leak, but man its really pretty bad, I will likely never purchase a Tusk gasket. Anyone else have similar or different experiences ?
 

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Prefer OEM but never had a problem with the Tusk gaskets. Have used them several times on both sides.

These were alternator and clutch cover gaskets.

The OEM valve cover gasket is really not a consumable. They last forever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Prefer OEM but never had a problem with the Tusk gaskets. Have used them several times on both sides.

These were alternator and clutch cover gaskets.

The OEM valve cover gasket is really not a consumable. They last forever.
I see, I guess it did look pretty good when I took it off, but since it had small leak I thought a new one would be better. I'm also biased, since I used to be an airplane mechanic, always get new packings! Oh well, looks like I get to pull the cover again. Probably not soon. Also the bike runs waaaay better with the re-shim!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thought i'd follow up. I ordered and installed an OEM gasket. Oil leak is gone, it was leaking really bad. And, call me crazy, I think I even gained back some engine compression.

steer clear of tusk valve cover gaskets!
 

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I used many Tusk Gaskets including the Valve Cover Gasket/Seal. No issues at all. The Tusk Gaskets aren't as pretty as the Kawasaki OEM Gaskets are; but there is a huge price difference.

FWIW, on Gaskets, I use a product called Hylomar Sealant. A product I came to know and respect from my auto racing days. Fantastic stuff actually. Used by Rolls-Royce. Gaskets essentially become good for the lifetime of the component; even when reused several (as in many, many) times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I used many Tusk Gaskets including the Valve Cover Gasket/Seal. No issues at all. The Tusk Gaskets aren't as pretty as the Kawasaki OEM Gaskets are; but there is a huge price difference.

FWIW, on Gaskets, I use a product called Hylomar Sealant. A product I came to know and respect from my auto racing days. Fantastic stuff actually. Used by Rolls-Royce. Gaskets essentially become good for the lifetime of the component; even when reused several (as in many, many) times.
I agree there is a huge price difference, that's why I tried the Tusk. I mostly made this post to see if my experience was typical. I was on the fence about using a sealant; it didn't appear to be necessary from what I read about the valve cover, so I did not. I guess however, maybe the Tusk gasket would have held if I did apply some sealer. Ultimately, I tried them out and feel like I've wasted time and money on them.
 

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The whole point of the OEM's use of a thick rubber valve cover gasket was to make it re-useable.
The only points which might have required use of a sealant should/could have been at the 'eye-balls' on the cam chain tunnel on the LH side. FWIW, I quit using sealant on that Genuine Kawasaki gasket in that area in about 1990!

But the Suzuki DRZ400/Kawasaki KLX400 or RMZ250F/KX250F valve cover gasket will leak everytime at the 'eyeballs' if sealant is not used in the area.

As to almost any of the paper based engine cover gaskets, proper preparation of both surfaces is usually the most important. CLEAN, Smooth, Degreased & Dry will usually allow the resin which is usually impregnated into the paper base materials to adhere to the surfaces.
The use of oils or greases to allow re-use of these gaskets May allow the gasket to slip out of joint surfaces & leak. Especially near pressurized areas like the oil passage to the external oil pipe & the oil filter itself, which can have up to 85 psi of cold oil pressure. (How many ever use a steel straight edge or surface plate to confirm an engine cover is Not Warped?)
 

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The whole point of the OEM's use of a thick rubber valve cover gasket was to make it re-useable.
The only points which might have required use of a sealant should/could have been at the 'eye-balls' on the cam chain tunnel on the LH side. FWIW, I quit using sealant on that Genuine Kawasaki gasket in that area in about 1990!

But the Suzuki DRZ400/Kawasaki KLX400 or RMZ250F/KX250F valve cover gasket will leak everytime at the 'eyeballs' if sealant is not used in the area.

As to almost any of the paper based engine cover gaskets, proper preparation of both surfaces is usually the most important. CLEAN, Smooth, Degreased & Dry will usually allow the resin which is usually impregnated into the paper base materials to adhere to the surfaces.
The use of oils or greases to allow re-use of these gaskets May allow the gasket to slip out of joint surfaces & leak. Especially near pressurized areas like the oil passage to the external oil pipe & the oil filter itself, which can have up to 85 psi of cold oil pressure. (How many ever use a steel straight edge or surface plate to confirm an engine cover is Not Warped?)
Just to make sure I understand, I'm replacing the clutch cover and water pump gaskets using Tusk gaskets. Should I apply Yamabond 4 to them or install them dry? The gasket mating surfaces are "CLEAN, Smooth, Degreased & Dry".

ps. I'm doing your oil mod so removed clutch cover to install the oil to the crank restriction.
 

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Most modern gaskets are impregnated with a resin, which bonds to the clean, dry metal surfaces with the 1st engine heat-cycle with no added sealant.
Some KLR owners will actually apply a very thin coat of grease to the 'cover' to Prevent the new gasket from adhering to it.
So they 'might' be able to do an in-field removal & replacement without tearing a gasket.

Don't forget to install the clutch cover Inner oil filter cavity o-ring!!
 

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Tusk gaskets are simply economy paper gaskets. I've used them a lot. I have always applied a good coating of grease to paper gaskets, let them sit for a bit, wiped them off, and installed them. I have believed that the gasket gets a bit softer and seals a bit better when it has some grease in it and it should be less of a pain to scrape off of at a later date.
 

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Tusk gaskets are simply economy paper gaskets. I've used them a lot. I have always applied a good coating of grease to paper gaskets, let them sit for a bit, wiped them off, and installed them. I have believed that the gasket gets a bit softer and seals a bit better when it has some grease in it and it should be less of a pain to scrape off of at a later date.
Thanks! Since it took me most of a day to clean off all the bits and pieces of the original gasket, I'll give the new gaskets a good coat of grease per your directions and install.
 

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Knock wood that you won't have to go back in there. When I was doing testing for the oil mods I had the clutch cover on and off a few times a week. The Tusk gaskets held up pretty well to this abuse, sealing well and getting re-used a few times. Granted, they weren't on long enough to get baked in place.

There have been a few reports of the clutch cover gasket failing just above the clutch. There is an oil passage built into the wall of the cover that doesn't have a lot of pressure in it, but any weakness or deformity in the gasket will lead to the oil rupturing the gasket. This would become a 'dramatic leak'. Drama and motorcycles do not go well together. I have never had a problem with it, and I've installed my clutch cover dozens of times and reused the gasket in doing so. I don't know what it is that others might have done to cause a failure, but forewarned is forearmed.
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Pay heed to @pdwestman's advice about installing the o-ring, and make it a new one. You don't want any leakage from the relatively high pressure in the oil cavity to the no-pressure in the clutch area.
 
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