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I discovered recently that the oil drain bolt I've got fitted to my bike is the Tusk one. I heard on an old post that they're not recommended. What's the deal there?
 

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I discovered recently that the oil drain bolt I've got fitted to my bike is the Tusk one. I heard on an old post that they're not recommended. What's the deal there?
Hmmm, thats what I put in my KLR. The magnetic one.
The TUSK brand drain plugs usually come with a STEEL Flat Washer stuck to the magnet, instead of a Soft, Crushable, Thick, aluminum or copper GASKET! If people don't re-use their OEM thick, soft, crushable Gasket on their new Tusk Magnetic drain plug, the Steel washer may allow leakage.

Then owners tend to try to OVER-TIGHTEN the drain plug which may strip the threads out of the engine case. Or they might get lucky and only SPLIT the Tusk drain plug allen socket head and then strip the corners off of their allen key trying to Extract the Split POS.
Which then may require a chisel & hammer to initiate the loosening!

Click on 'Bill10' name or access 'Members List' thru the 'TOOLS' and find his thread.
 

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Interesting, I will probably just replace it with a different brand, when I change my oil. I used my old washer, and was in the auto service industry, so I was careful, that I didn't over tighten my Tusk plug.
 

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Interesting, I will probably just replace it with a different brand, when I change my oil. I used my old washer, and was in the auto service industry, so I was careful, that I didn't over tighten my Tusk plug.
Did your TUSK drain plug come with the Steel Flat Washer?
 

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Samuel and Pbk16gt, I'd dare suggest you have a NON-problem! If your Tusk oil drain plug seals, and you're savvy enough not to over-tighten it, I see no threatening problem. Yet, I do not want to affect negatively the "proper" oil drain plug manufacturers' and vendors' livelihoods; if you wish to pay homage to that manufacturing and distributing segment of the economy, feel free! :)
 

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Interesting, I will probably just replace it with a different brand, when I change my oil. I used my old washer, and was in the auto service industry, so I was careful, that I didn't over tighten my Tusk plug.
Did your TUSK drain plug come with the Steel Flat Washer?
I really don't recall, but I do remember using the old one, probably because it was aluminum.
 

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Samuel and Pbk16gt, I'd dare suggest you have a NON-problem! If your Tusk oil drain plug seals, and you're savvy enough not to over-tighten it, I see no threatening problem. Yet, I do not want to affect negatively the "proper" oil drain plug manufacturers' and vendors' livelihoods; if you wish to pay homage to that manufacturing and distributing segment of the economy, feel free! :)
Is re-using a CRUSH washer (as in, an aluminum one) recommended?

Just askin'!

:)
 

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Is re-using a CRUSH washer (as in, an aluminum one) recommended?

Just askin'!

:)
As I'm sure that you know and do yourself, the key is to Not Crush them to death on the 1st couple of oil changes.

When one feels the crush gasket go 'squish' the first little bit, Stop Tightening! It will only keep squishing with each further attempt to tighten.

If and when the crushed gasket begins to 'roll around' the sides of the hex head, its time for a new one.
Or you can replace them at every oil change. Its your choice!
 

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I use a torque wrench and have never found a need for more than 15 or 16 ftlbs to both stop leaking and keep the plug from backing out. I use a Eagle Mike magnetic plug and his aluminum washers. At 15 lbs I don't think it does much crushing as I don't see any evidence of it when taking it out when I change oil. I barely see a line on it where the hex head slipped over it during tightening. I bet that same washer will last through many oil changes if I continue to use it that way.
I believe if you are tightening an aluminum washer to the point it starts to roll over the bolt head you're really putting too much torque on it, especially with the case threads being as fragile as they are.
 

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I use a torque wrench… at 15 lbs I don't think it does much crushing… if you are tightening an aluminum washer to the point it starts to roll over the bolt head you're really putting too much torque on it
I'm the same way. I've used a new Kawi crush washer each time I've changed the thing, and I only put 15 lbs of pressure on the bolt. It does not leak. It's good to know that I don't need to worry about getting a new one. My impression was that the bolt itself was weak or prone to cracking, and while I can't vouch for the mechanic who did the single oil change performed (i.e. as evidenced by the presence of this new plug) before I got the bike (at 50 miles), I'm now feeling comfortable with keeping the Tusk and using proper crush washers. Thanks!
 

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15 ft-lbs of torque on a 12mm bolt yields about 2,000 pounds of clamping force. It's all about wedges and sines and cosines and stuff like that.

The contact area under the head of a stock bolt is .3in^2, so the pressure is 6,600 psi.

The yield strength of rolled 1060 aluminum is about 18,000psi. I'm not saying the washer is necessarily 1060, but that is a common rolled aluminum product and the rolling process work-hardens it a bit.

The oil crush washer is not that heavily loaded at 15 ft-lb on the bolt.

Copper crush washers, like those used with the banjo bolts, are a different matter.
 
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Even those copper washers can be quite hard if not annealed after a couple of uses. Even new some can be very hard. I had one come out of the package that was too hard to conform to a brake caliper on my Ford. So hard I was worried about stripping out the threads. A few seconds in the flame of my propane torch and it sealed up with minimal torque.
 

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Unless someone wanted the magnet you could use a cut off wheel and a hand file to turn the factory bolt into a low profile one in a few minutes. I got the Eagle Mike bolt for both the magnet and the hex head. Nothing worse than mistakenly using a slightly smaller Allen key and rounding out the female hex on a drain bolt. Probably wouldn't happen considering the low level of torque in the plug, but I just like to use my 6 point socket instead.
 

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1) the tusk ones are known to break (head at the hex)
2) torque is wrong IMO at 21 ft lbs in some manuals, 17 in others.....I use Eaglemike's recommended 15 ft lbs.
3) I have a dozen crush washers on the shelf but I routinely re-use them 6-12 times without issue.


If I had the tusk unit, I'd order an EM one and swap 'em.

Dave
 
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