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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if anyone has ever thought about using two tubes in their wheels? One as a spare.

Wouldn't it be possible to have an extra 2nd tube installed that was up against the wheel laying on the rubbed spoke guard that was vacuumed flat? You'd have to drill a hole for a second valve stem but if you could pull it off, you'd have a second tube in the wheel ready to go. It would be up near the wheel where it would survive a puncture and have to go around the 1st tubes stem.

If you had a flat, you could just pull the valve stem on the punctured tube and inflate the spare tube.

Just a thought. Maybe I need a nap ;)
 

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What about the valve itself? Might cause a problem, however; I love this idea! What if you just manufacted a tube with one stem that could service two tubes?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
What about the stem itself? Might cause a problem, however; I love this idea! What if you just manufacted a tube with one stem that could service two tubes?
A tube in a tube with two stems would be better but I've never seen such a thing.

I think the thing to do would be to drill the new hole off to the side of the wheel 180 from the old hole. I'd use that new hole for the "primary" tube. That would allow the second "back up" tube more room in the center of the wheel and identify one tube from the other.

When filling the first time, I'd remove the valve stem from the back up tube and let the primary tube push the air out of the back up tube (if any was still present).

If you had a flat, you'd have to make sure the puncturing object wasn't still in the tire or you'd soon have a second flat. You'd also have to carry a valve stem removal tool (or cut the old valve stem) and some sort of small pump or canister to inflate it.
 

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You Can NOT pull the head of the original tube out thru the hole.

Most people have a hard enough time getting 1 tube in with-out pinching it. And I dis-like heavy duty tubes for the same reason, too much rubber keeping some of the Thick Beaded tires from squeezing down into the drop-center of the spoke well, can make for quite a fight to mount a tire.

I seem to collect 'slivers' off the sides of the railroad rails or 4 inch long deck screws in my rear tires. They always seem to perforate the inner tube against the rim about 16 times before I get full stopped. I don't think I'd try 2 tubes at once. ;)
 

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It's always good to think outside the box. Issues with the idea (IMO);

- As Paul said; pretty hard to avoid pinching two tubes putting them in at once unless you had some special system

- the second tube wouldn't be perfectly positioned so you'd have potential balancing issues.

- As you've noted; if the puncture was due to a nail/screw/cactus needle, etc. you'd just blow tube #2 unless you found and removed it.


There may be a good idea there for a "twin chambered tube". .....hmmm


Patroy; there are a number of airless options including bib mousse's and tire balls.....none (so far) work well with higher speeds and sustained usage.

The Tubliss system with Ride-on is probably the best option out there right now but you have to swap to an 18" rear rim.


Cheers,
Dave
 

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In case of a tire emergency, I always bring my repair kit, my trail jack, and my tire irons. Just having it with me is my "flat prevention" technique, a la Murphy's Law.

I do like the double tube idea, and although it may be impractical for the inner tube, having a "pre-loaded 2nd shot" contingency is not a bad idea...

I have an extra clutch cable routed right next to my current (functioning) one; they always seem to break at the worst possible time, so now when the current one breaks, I've got a new one just waiting for to be hooked up and it's already (mostly) routed!

Per Murphy's Law, my clutch cable will never ever break as long as I have a spare one rigged up and ready to go...
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
You Can NOT pull the head of the original tube out thru the hole.
You wouldn't have to remove it. You could just remove the valve stem core to allow what air was left to escape or take a knife and cut it. All you'd need to do is deflate it all the way.

I agree it would be fun to get the second tube in. Maybe use a smaller tube than stock and fold it up in thirds. You could tape it together with electrical tape just enough to hold it in place while installing the tire. The tape would break when you inflated the tube if you used it sparingly. It could be a "light duty" tube that is a lot smaller than a stock tube. Just a "get me home" tube that you inflated larger than designed.

As for balance, I don't see much of an issue. It would add some weight but very little. The weight would be pretty much distributed around the wheel evenly and how many people even balance their KLR tires anyway. I did but there's many people that ride em' without balancing.

Check this out: https://gizmodo.com/a-double-chamber-bike-tire-helps-prevent-flats-when-you-1520851691
 

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Not entirely relevant to the current discussion, perhaps, but . . . I have heard (or read) of taking an unserviceable inner tube, cutting out the valve stem, and slitting the tube's inner circumference to create a sort of, "jacket," for a sound tube. Encased in the discarded tube, the combo protects (somewhat) the air-holding integrity of the "new" tube; sort of a super heavy-duty tube, rubber thickness wise.

No, never tried it, nor seen it in action.
 
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