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Well thanks to you all I did my valves. What a difference! Starts much easier now. I do have a few questions. How do you torque a couple of those bolts accurately? What torque wrench fits under the frame? I have Craftsman torque wrenches and the left intake cam cap bolt was a bugger as was the left valve cover bolt, the frame is in the way. Just a thought, can one use a crows foot on a torque wrench? Thanks.
 

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D C,
If one does use a crows foot or better yet a pipe fitting wrench (5 sided) on a torque wrench, the crows foot is best used 'side-ways' 90 degrees to the torque wrench. This allows to use normal torque number. If the crows foot or other adapters are used facing forward Any Amount you must use a mathematical formula to Compensate for the Extra Leverage Gained. Do we see the Increased possibility of Stripped Threads??

My Snap-On, Micrometer 1/4" drive, 40-200 in.lb. torque wrench has only an 11mm thick, ratchet head. Works well in tight confines.

There have been times, for all of us, that we need to torque fasteners which are in-accessible with our torque wrenches, and have to use 'something else' on one or two in-accessible fasteners. Important to maintain 'pattern' of torqueing on some things. And you 'pre-test' your strength with the 'other' wrench on fasteners which were properly torqued, even in sequential patterns.
 

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Thanks for the reply, I plan on checking out that torque wrench. Steel bolts and aluminum threads make me nervous!
 

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The valve check info that everyone has been waiting for:

I decided to check and shim the valves today at 5500 miles on my 2015 KLR650 (did the doo with an Eagle Mike torsion spring and doo at 2100 miles).

I ride my bike in a moderate manner, use Rotella 14w40 conventional oil, Kawasaki oil filter, keep the air filter clean, etc.

So, the left exhaust was at .005 (2.55 OEM shim) and measured at .009 with a 2.45 shim.
The right exhaust was at .006 (2.55 OEM shim) and measured at .009 with a 2.45 shim.

The left intake was .006 (2.65 OEM shim) and measured at .008 with a 2.60 shim.
The right intake was .005 (2.70 OEM shim) and measured at .007 with a 2.65 shim.

I am good for a while and will re-check them in 12,000 miles or so.

I also decided to remove all of the bodywork and the front fairing to tie off and insulate any errant wiring that could rub/short out. I found the usual spots on 2nd Gen bikes and insulated all possible rub spots (there are several potential rub points where the wires cross the fairing support bracket).
 

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I need to check mine someday...
 

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Well thanks to you all I did my valves. What a difference! Starts much easier now. I do have a few questions. How do you torque a couple of those bolts accurately? What torque wrench fits under the frame? I have Craftsman torque wrenches and the left intake cam cap bolt was a bugger as was the left valve cover bolt, the frame is in the way. Just a thought, can one use a crows foot on a torque wrench? Thanks.
I wondered the same darn thing when I did mine - when it was time for reassembly, there were at least two bolts that there was no way to get a torque wrench on. I tightened them with a regular wrench and guessed - the alternative was to abandon the bike?? I rationalized my choice by thinking: "Well, there are a couple of hundred thousand KLR owners who faced this same problem and had to button up their bikes, and I don't recall any horror stories about those cap bolts falling out from inadequate torque." So now I wait and see...
 

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I wondered the same darn thing when I did mine - when it was time for reassembly, there were at least two bolts that there was no way to get a torque wrench on. I tightened them with a regular wrench and guessed - the alternative was to abandon the bike?? I rationalized my choice by thinking: "Well, there are a couple of hundred thousand KLR owners who faced this same problem and had to button up their bikes, and I don't recall any horror stories about those cap bolts falling out from inadequate torque." So now I wait and see...
I used a Harbor Freight 1/4" torque wrench with a 10mm 1/4" drive Craftsman socket to tighten the cam cap bolts and had enough clearance. They were torqued to 103 inch pounds. I never use a torque wrench on the four cam cover bolts and just gently (gently, I say) snug them down with a box end wrench and have never had one leak, nor stripped one.
 

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OK I've finally decided its time for me to check the shims.
Excellent info above whisperquiet.
What size shims does the KLR use? For instance, my KLX uses 7.48 shims.
Thanks!
 

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The KLR650 uses 29mm shims.....they are about the size of a quarter with normal thickness between 2.30 and 2.75. I just shimmed my 2015 and the original shims were 2.55 to 2.70 from the factory.
 

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The valve check info that everyone has been waiting for:

I decided to check and shim the valves today at 5500 miles on my 2015 KLR650 (did the doo with an Eagle Mike torsion spring and doo at 2100 miles).

I ride my bike in a moderate manner, use Rotella 14w40 conventional oil, Kawasaki oil filter, keep the air filter clean, etc.

So, the left exhaust was at .005 (2.55 OEM shim) and measured at .009 with a 2.45 shim.
The right exhaust was at .006 (2.55 OEM shim) and measured at .009 with a 2.45 shim.

The left intake was .006 (2.65 OEM shim) and measured at .008 with a 2.60 shim.
The right intake was .005 (2.70 OEM shim) and measured at .007 with a 2.65 shim.

I am good for a while and will re-check them in 12,000 miles or so.

I also decided to remove all of the bodywork and the front fairing to tie off and insulate any errant wiring that could rub/short out. I found the usual spots on 2nd Gen bikes and insulated all possible rub spots (there are several potential rub points where the wires cross the fairing support bracket).
The interval on clearances is 15K miles in the owners manual. What made you want to dig in there at 5.5K? Is there something about the KLR in general that calls for early clearance checks?

You apparently thought the clearances were tight. What are the tolerance ranges for the exhaust and intake?

I'm currently waiting on delivery of a 2016 KLR650 and don't have a service manual yet either. So, thanks in advance!
 

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When the second generation KLR650 (2008) came out in the fall of 2007, the maintenance schedule was changed to 15,000 miles for the first valve clearance check. Little was changed from the first generation KLR which had a first valve check at 600 miles and every 6000 miles after the first check.

Past experience by forum members has shown that a first valve clearance check and shim (if necessary) should be completed between 4000 and 6000 miles. Many a KLR owner has found the valves (especially the exhausts) to be very tight and under spec if they wait too long to perform the clearance check.

The specs on the intake are .004 to .008 thousands
and the exhausts are .006 to .010 thousands

or using metric measurements at .10 to .20 intake
.15 to .25 exhaust
 

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Thank you. Good information for KLR newbs.

One of your exhausts was out of tolerance and the other was on the bubble (both tight). That's proof that moving up the interval to 5,500 is in order, I'd say.
 

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Wondering if the PO of my bike did the valves. He did the doohickey mod so I'm thinking he would have done valves.

I watched a video of the valve check on youtube and did not see where difficulty using a torque wrench.
 

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I've looked at a couple valve clearance write ups/pictorials. Looks like the KLR is set up shim-over-bucket. Is that the case?
 

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A decent video on the process. A LOT easier than my bandit!
That was a good video. Yeah, that looks easier than many I’ve done, but sometimes all the disassembly/reassembly to get to the valves and then get everything back together is what takes all the time. I recently did valve clearances on my Versys 1000. Took me about seven hours … and all my clearances were in spec!

How the guy in the vid applied the formula was a little confusing. I assume he was calculating the exhaust replacement shim:

2.70 + .25 - .10 = 2.85

Acceptable clearances are provided as a range of tolerances. The tolerance range was 0.15—0.25 for the exhaust (measured at 0.25) and 0.10—0.20 for intake (measured at 0.10). He would want to set the specified clearances at the high (looser) end of the tolerance range. So …

The formula for the exhaust would be 2.70 + 0.25 - 0.25 = 2.70.

The formula for the intake would be 2.70 + .20 - .10 = 2.80.

Also, before doing the formula I would have put a micrometer on the stock shims just to confirm the thickness. They're not supposed to wear much, but I understand that sometimes they do.
 

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That was a good video. Yeah, that looks easier than many I’ve done, but sometimes all the disassembly/reassembly to get to the valves and then get everything back together is what takes all the time. I recently did valve clearances on my Versys 1000. Took me about seven hours … and all my clearances were in spec!

Also, before doing the formula I would have put a micrometer on the stock shims just to confirm the thickness. They're not supposed to wear much, but I understand that sometimes they do.
I like my formula better.
Each 0.05 mm = 0.002 inches. So loosen a valve .004inch = 2 sizes thinner shim.
I have not been able to purchase a METRIC thickness / feeler gauge in 0.025 millimeter increments! Not from Snap-On, NAPA, Car-Quest, O'Rileys, Pamida, Alco, Boomgars, Lintons Big R, Wal-Mart!
They all sell a metric thickness gauge in 0.05mm increments, at least here in the U.S.A.. That's 0.002 inch increments! Too coarse!

So I use Inches Only, when doing valve tappets!!!

Next comment,
Brand New valve shims can vary by as much as 0.0006 inches! Yes, 2/3rds of a Thousandth of an inch! Thicker or Thinner!
I've never seen one "worn" that much.
 

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................Brand New valve shims can vary by as much as 0.0006 inches! Yes, 2/3rds of a Thousandth of an inch! Thicker or Thinner!
I've never seen one "worn" that much.
Speaking of accuracy in measurements, my gauges are in 0.001" increments ie; 0.004", 0.005", 0.006' ....... . That means that when I measure a gap as 0.008" it could actually be 0.00899" or almost one thousandth of an inch wider. That is 25% of the range between minimum and maximum allowed clearance.

I don't let those little things bother me. I just get close and go with it.

Seeing Pdwestman in the post above reminds me to mention that the carburetor fuel inlet elbow that is supposed to be non-replaceable on 2010 and newer KLRs can be removed with a pair of pliers and replaced with one for a Harley Sportster.
 

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I like my feeler gauges I got from the local MC shop for $8. They are thinner on the end so its much easier to get in the smaller head of my 250 MX bikes. Its by Bike Master and I think it has 32 or 36 feelers.
 
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