Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Apologies as think there was a thread like this but couldn't find. I know many of us are working on other projects/repairs and thought it would be interesting to hear about them.

I have a 1975 Arctic Cat 440 which a friend bought to get going. These are the single Walbro carbs with integral fuel pump so felt lucky to find a carb kit on line. Compression is good, good spark and such to sorting the carb then hoping it doesn't need crankcase seals...

Another friend dropped off a 1985 Honda VF750S which hadn't been running for many years. Both trigger coils were bad and carbs flooding. These are the dual ignition system models which have a separate trigger oil, module and ignition coil for each pair of cylinders. I was a bit nervous over ordering trigger coils as still wonder about the probability of both failing but the scope tells all. :)

Carbs are waiting for "O" rings and other bits.

Old EM600 Honda Generator still here waiting to try a Chinese scooter ignition module. Module not here but he borrowed another one which runs so need to get my butt in gear and see if there is ignition advance and whether it's air gap or module based.

Just replaced the muffler on Mister2 (my collector 86 Toyota MR2) interesting as it corroded through the pipe between cat and muffler so managed to find a new muffler. Interesting part is that it now idles 100 RPM higher so seems the old muffler must have been quite restrictive. Hadn't noticed anything but then likely wouldn't unless it was really bad.

What other stuff is on the bench at your place?
 

·
Lifetime Member
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
Nothing big going on in my garage these days. About the only project I have ongoing is repowering a1971 CT70 that I had when I was a wee young lad :). I tried to overhaul it when I was about 12 and pretty much destroyed it in the process... Lol!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
I've got a Honda HS 35 snowblower that was recently given to me that I'm trying to get running right for my son. Starts good from cold but not well from hot. Doesn't seem to have power under load. Figure it's not getting fuel and am planning on pulling the carb off and giving it a dunk. Think it got stored with fuel that has long since evaporated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
129 Posts
Just finished putting new pistons in a seriously seized RD400. About to start on a neglected Honda 4 cylinder of undetermined vintage. With this one I would have to work pretty hard to do any harm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
My project bike is a '91 Honda CBR 600 F2. I got it for $300 about three years ago. It's the other bike I tinker on. When I'm finished with it, it will be a Repsol copy. Here's an early picture of the first ride after I finally got it running.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,206 Posts
I've got a Honda HS 35 snowblower that was recently given to me that I'm trying to get running right for my son. Starts good from cold but not well from hot. Doesn't seem to have power under load. Figure it's not getting fuel and am planning on pulling the carb off and giving it a dunk. Think it got stored with fuel that has long since evaporated.
Had a snow blower given to me doing much the same thing. Turned out the throttle shaft was seized to the body of the carb. When I freed that up it ran fine!
jj
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
I've got one of those Chinese 49cc scooters I used to ride around town. Last Summer it made a big clunk and the engine locked up: won't turn with even the kick starter.

So, I don't know if there's something seriously wrong or maybe something just broke and got jammed up with the electric starter.

I've been meaning to start taking it apart and checking it out, but never have the time. My goal is to pull the engine out and get it on the bench in the basement so I can mess around with it this Winter.

Don't know if I'll be ordering parts to fix it or taking the whole machine apart piece by piece and throwing a little of it in the trash each week.

You can buy a new engine/transmission unit for around $350 but the rest of the thing is ratty enough it wouldn't be worth the investment.

I've also got a fairly-new self-propelled push mower I never use and would like to sell, but it only runs at half-speed for about 20 seconds and then dies. It has some kind of automatic choke mechanism and I'd say there's something wrong with that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,206 Posts
I've got one of those Chinese 49cc scooters I used to ride around town. Last Summer it made a big clunk and the engine locked up: won't turn with even the kick starter.

So, I don't know if there's something seriously wrong or maybe something just broke and got jammed up with the electric starter.

I've been meaning to start taking it apart and checking it out, but never have the time. My goal is to pull the engine out and get it on the bench in the basement so I can mess around with it this Winter.

Don't know if I'll be ordering parts to fix it or taking the whole machine apart piece by piece and throwing a little of it in the trash each week.

You can buy a new engine/transmission unit for around $350 but the rest of the thing is ratty enough it wouldn't be worth the investment.

I've also got a fairly-new self-propelled push mower I never use and would like to sell, but it only runs at half-speed for about 20 seconds and then dies. It has some kind of automatic choke mechanism and I'd say there's something wrong with that.
Is that the kind where the rectangular tank is screwed directly to the bottom of the carb planalp? I just fixed a friend's mower with symptoms like that. there was so much sediment in the carb it would cover the fuel suction tube screen after a few seconds and kill the engine. The sediment would fall away and you could restart it easily then kill itself again. I removed the carb and tank, cleaned out the sediment and it runs like a top. 34 hour work.
Regards....justjeff
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,495 Posts
It's a bit wet out, coming back to the ship from Rothenburg. My biggest project is getting out of these wet clothes and into a dry martini.

Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
Is that the kind where the rectangular tank is screwed directly to the bottom of the carb planalp? I just fixed a friend's mower with symptoms like that. there was so much sediment in the carb it would cover the fuel suction tube screen after a few seconds and kill the engine. The sediment would fall away and you could restart it easily then kill itself again. I removed the carb and tank, cleaned out the sediment and it runs like a top. 34 hour work.
Regards....justjeff
Right on. Thanks, justjeff. I'll give it a go.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
I thought you were just slow.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,564 Posts
With me and my proven record of "What Can Go Wrong Will Go Wrong" it will probably turn into more like 34 hours rather than 3/4 of an hour........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
3/4 hour for the shop rate, 34 hours includes speculating as to how the job might be avoided, discussing when to do it, visiting with friends to discuss, beer & pizza, resting to be in top condition for the task, deciding as to who you will blame for anything which goes wrong, all those things must be factored into the task + one shouldn't rush... ;-)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,206 Posts
Bahahahahhah!! You guys crack me up, as if I need to be more cracked than I already am....:character00201:
jj
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
Had a snow blower given to me doing much the same thing. Turned out the throttle shaft was seized to the body of the carb. When I freed that up it ran fine!
jj
I haven't got to it yet. (haven't got 34 hours LOL). I'll certainly check that out because when I would try to work the govenor it didn't do anythng so it may be related.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Just finished a bunch of work including carb (Walbro....groan) in a 1975 Arctic Cat 440 snowmobile, then back to a couple of small Honda generators for my brother-in-law. The carb on the EM500 was full of water so more than a bit of corrosion. Ran a jet drill through the main jet which was plugged solid, then a few cycles of the ultrasonic cleaner for the carb, cleaned the tank, oil in the cylinder to establish some compression and its running well.

The EM600 has no spark with bad module identified so tried a Chinese scooter module on the EM500 to confirm that it will charge and trigger. These engines use a charge coil and trigger coil like the KLR650 but too much on the go to fool with advance curve measurements. It's clear that the scooter module has more advance than the stock one because the engine has more power with the scooter than stock module.

When get time will play with one on my KLR to see whether it works and how it runs + advance curve comparison.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Scooter-AC-CDI-Ignition-MODULE-/291283078018?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43d1d30b82

The pin out for the module as oriented in the photo is:

12 3
45 6

1- Trigger coil
2- Ignition coil
3- Kill switch (kill switch grounds this circuit to stop)
4- Ground
5- Ground
6- Charge coil

Some engines float the trigger and charge coils (float = not grounded) so one can simply ground one side of each for this type of module.

These are really inexpensive so may bail someone out on a project.

I'll try to make time to play with the KLR as it might be useful for a 3rd World traveller as an option.

The EM600 has a dead module + the charge coil isn't providing enough output so pulled the generator apart to check connections. Will see if it can be saved and spliced to a scooter module and ignition coil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Got a couple bike's I would like to get ready to take to Mid-Ohio Vintage Day's in 2015 & race , a 1978 Suzuki RM 250C & a 1985 Yamaha IT 200N , also would like to sell off a few thing's so as to get myself a new adventure bike , just picked up a nice 1983 Holsclaw 3-rail bike trailer that I'm completely going over to carry all the vintage bike's on .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,481 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I'm perhaps more easily amused than some but found a recent hot water tank problem to be interesting.

We have been in this 20-something year old hose for 14 years and replaced our natural gas hot water tank in 2007. All has been well until recently when the temperature-pressure relief valve began periodically venting 1/2 to one cup of water.

I checked tank temperature which was within the lower range so clearly not intended venting so replaced the "safety" valve. Problem continued and consultation with the person at the hardware supply suggested that the valve might be defective so replaced with another make of valve. Same problem.

Now, might mention just to place my level of embarassment into context, that I have a 3rd Class Power Engineering Certificate and the last "hot water" system with which I was engaged was one in which about 550,000 pounds of water were converted to steam at 700 PSI per hour. A home hot water tank is too tiny to even imagine. ;-)

Thinking about this, I was baffled even after research because this was an over pressure problem apparently but couldn't identify a cause since there was no check valve in the inlet from city water. It seemed that the tank must be over pressuring due to thermal expansion but there was no such check valve as one would expect with a boiler feed water pump. Reading and such showed no check valve in domestic hot water tanks but can state that some absolutely do have, including ours.

Pascal's Law indicates that the thermal expansion of the heating water in the tank will simply push the expanded volume back into the inlet, so while system pressure might rise, it will only rise by the amount produced in the whole city system. No check valve in our system means that it is contiguous with the city lines.

Installing a pressure gauge onto the hot water tank drain showed domestic pressure of 100 PSI+ which rose to 120 PSI at certain times. Yikes! But this doesn't explain the venting because the safety valve's set point is 150 PSI....hmm. Visited a plumbing contractor, which of course some of you have already considered, and the story became clear. Our building codes require a pressure regulator be installed into houses at the water line entry but ours lacked this device.

OK, that raises pressure but not into the relief pressure so asked the plumber about the presence of check valves in hot water tanks, to which he replied that many modern tanks have such valves in order to improve heat efficiency. Nothing I can find on line shows such a valve but there must be on in place because it explains two factors:

1) The increase in tank pressure following hot water use and during the reheating process.

2) That tank pressure remains constant if the house's water inlet valve from city water is closed and a cold water tap opened. In this case, the pressure in the cold water lines drops to near zero and so should the pressure in the tank. Unless there is a closed valve between hot water tank cold water inlet and the cold water piping.

This was an interesting process of deduction and simple measurements in order to deduce the presence of a non-indicated check valve.

The cure? Installed a pressure regulator right after the main water inlet shut-off valve to drop pressure to 50 PSI. The increased expansion of the hot water tank volume seems not to be sufficient to raise tank pressure to the safety valve's set point. If it continues to do so, a bleed hole will be "inserted" in the check valve or a bleed line will be run from the safety valve port to the cold water inlet line to prevent over pressure due to expansion. I don't expect this to be the case.

Reminds me:
1) Low flow in house piping can be clogged inlet screen in the pressure regulator. We used to clean small boiler ones periodically so it would be likely that house ones have the same issue.

2) It's the time of year to check elderly neighbors' outside taps to make sure that someone doesn't have a garden hose in place. Leaving a garden hose on the tap, or a shut-off tee and such, can prevent the tap from draining resulting in freeze breakage and maybe a huge water damage bill later on.

Yes, not motorcycle at all but same skills and same deductive process so thought it might be interesting/useful.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,610 Posts
Have my 34 year old Lawnboy in the shop to replace crankshaft seals. This has been one fantastic machine. I have literally done nothing in the way of repairs to it and it just purrs away.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top