Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As I said in my intro, just bought a 2008 and it had sat for three years before I trailered it home. I drained gas, changed oil, oil filter, battery, sparkplug, re-jetted carb/cleaned carb, replaced rear shock due to leakage. Did the .22 mod and drilled out the hole to 5/64. Air screw has been backed out to 1 turn. Runs pretty good, some backfiring when I decal?
Please advise with any recommendations or what I should look for on a bike that sat for three years.

Mark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Keep a good eye on oil level, 08-09 are known for consuming oil, unless piston and rings have been upgraded.

Gordon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
One OBTW, when I was re-jetting the carb I couldn't get the pilot air screw out with out having to use some penetrating fluid and working the pilot air screw back and forth. When I did finally get it out the threads on the pilot air screw were rounded and the tip was bent a little. I couldn't get the new one from the rebuild kit to go in correctly and ended up wrecking it up worse than the old one. So I replaced the spring and washers of the old one with the new ones and put the old air screw back in.
(Anyone confused yet?)

So I was wondering can chase the threads of the pilot air screw hole on the carb using a tap? If so, any idea what size tap I need?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Maybe an expert will chime in but if you have an old pilot air screw take it to your local handyman and use their thread guages or pull taps and hold the screw and tap up and together to visually compare threads. If close then drill and tap a hole in a small piece of alum and check threads for size.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,206 Posts
rhyno23
I am a machinist. This is a simple job. I would measure the diameter and thread pitch of a NEW needle to get the information for the correct tap. A decent machine shop will be able to do this for you. The hole will need to be carefully chased (re threaded) with the proper tap to prevent further damage. It will also need to be cleaned out carefully as well before inserting the new needle.
We used to accept a box of donuts or a case of beer for doing this kind of job for a customer!
JJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
There is only one pilot mixture screw size. It actually controls fuel not air.

You might want to keep an eye on your tires for cracks since you don't know how old they are.

You didn't mention how many miles are on the bike, but if over 5,000, I would want to check valve clearances and consider replacing the balancer chain adjuster (doohickey) spring with a torsion spring.

When your dash, tail, brake and tag lights start burning out, consider LEDs. Stock turn signals should go forever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
There is only one pilot mixture screw size. It actually controls fuel not air.

You might want to keep an eye on your tires for cracks since you don't know how old they are.

You didn't mention how many miles are on the bike, but if over 5,000, I would want to check valve clearances and consider replacing the balancer chain adjuster (doohickey) spring with a torsion spring.

When your dash, tail, brake and tag lights start burning out, consider LEDs. Stock turn signals should go forever.
Bike had 3, 200 miles on it when bought. Now has about 3,500. I am a little worried about the tires, especially the rear, front still looks pretty good. Plan on changing them eventually. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
4,000 miles is about all most riders get on the stock rear tire. I use Kenda k270 50/50 dual sport tires and get around 8,000.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top