Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

21 - 23 of 23 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,368 Posts
Jason,

What really motivates me is how cold the oil gets at lower temps. That's what I'd really like to cure and what started me on this. 150°F oil just isn't right.

Every project starts with a goal and it didn't seem that I'd be able to make something that was adaptive that would warm the oil when it was cold and not heat it when it was hot. I figured I'd need to raise oil temps across the board and was especially looking for something that would prevent really cold oil when it is cold and rainy. Wet stuff cools far better than dry stuff, and rain just sucks heat out of the oil. This is why I am trying sump insulation.

To establish a goal I looked at as many credible data points as possible as far as 'optimal' oil temperatures. Everybody (except Kawasaki) thinks oil should be hotter than 200°F, preferably over 210°F to drive off water and 'volatile toxins'. Racers and performance-oriented folks like hot oil, over 235°F and as high as 275°F. Of course, they only use it for an hour, right? A sort of scattergram of all of this just seemed to point to 225°F; that became my goal. I have no better rationale than that.

My BMW R1200RT, from what data I can find, seems to run in the 225-250°F range, but it is also largely oil-cooled with a thermostatic cooler.

I'm going to continue to play with this thing, but my goal may be (heck, probably is) unachievable without impacting coolant temperatures and I don't want to do that. However, if I can bring the oil temperature up in cold and wet conditions I'll be satisfied with that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,829 Posts
Something is 'goofy' with the posting count for this thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
First the irreverent bit!

Observations regarding KLR650 coolant temperature.
Judging by the temp of the air being blown on my leg by the fan when I'm stopped at the lights and the ambient temp is well over 100 degrees: coolant is very hot!:wink2:

More seriously, I have never had the bike overheat. Even in the above conditions when the temp gauge is showing "eek, superhot!" it still handles it.
I very much agrees with Damocles; "if the temperature gauge needle stays shy of the far red zone, "Don't worry! Be happy!"".
KLRs run hot. Always will as far as I can see. A thermo-bob may be a technically better solution but with 60,000 miles on the clock and still going like a cut snake the bike in it's OEM cooling format works for me.


Also I have a temp gauge in everything I own. Idiot lights aren't good enough. Knowing exactly what the temp is doing is critical IMO. I did have to drop the speed back to 55mph in a car on one occasion when the ambient temp was over 115. The engine temp was getting too high. Having a gauge let me set the speed to the maximum without overheating. An idiot light would have just had me stopping and starting, scratching my head wondering what was happening.
 
21 - 23 of 23 Posts
Top