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Hey all,

I have noticed that my 2001 KLR is feeling a little less planted than usual when cornering on the street, but could not put my finger on what was off. I have about 20,000 miles on the bike now.

I put it up on the lift yesterday to lube the chain and grabbed the rear wheel and it wiggles a bit more than I remember, just a little bit of play can be felt.

I will look into this more this weekend as I could not tell if it was loose at the wheel itself or maybe the swing arm. I assume I need to pull the wheel off and should I be able to see anything with the wheel bearings that will confirm that they are wearing out?

Also, does anyone know of the size of these bearings or Part numbers that match so I can get them from a supply house or auto parts store.

Thanks
Ogre
 

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You may or may not be able to tell if your bearings are shot by looking at them. You've already checked for play and it does sound like they may be starting to go. I've got moose sealed bearings in my bike, but I forget who has them. Good luck.
 

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I just installed a set of Moose Sealed Bearings myself. Do I have to pack grease around the outside of the bearing before I put the wheel back on the bike?
 

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Biker Scout said:
Do I have to pack grease around the outside of the bearing before I put the wheel back on the bike?
No. they are sealed.

That said. I'd do it anyway. just to keep the clips in good shape to change them out again later.
(rather clean off greese.. then scrap/sand corrosion, getting the bearings out.)
Dont forget to grease the Axle too..k
 

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Where did you grab those sealed bearings? I am doing a tire change soon, might be a smart thing to do...
 

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Best to do all five bearing, front and rear, at the same time. If conditions led to rear failure, you're probably due for front bearing, too. Three in the back, two in the front. The sealed bearings (from Fred) were surprisingly cheap. There's few reasons NOT to change them out.
 

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wigglin

You might want to pull yer wheel and see if you might have dropped the inner spacer off the sprocket hub/damper assembly. It usually sticks in there on the bearing grease, but if you lay it down or bump it it can fall out. If this is the case the play will most likley trash yer bearings and hub, worst case scenario. Good luck..........Randy
 

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I am interested in the sealed wheel bearings for the KLR as well, but I don't know "Fred"...can someone provide contact information?

And or....where can a person find doubled sealed wheel bearings.....where can you find Moose bearings for the KLR.

Website links woud greatly be appreciated.

Thank you. Rick
 

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And now for some unsolicited opinion and advice....Wheel Bearings at a glance, from the book "As Pat sees it".

If you have any concerns about safety or bearing performance, stay away from Chinese and Russian manufactured bearings. Moose bearings are re-packaged All Balls bearings, made in China.

And now a word about who sells them. Parts marketing concepts for the KLR 650 had to have been developed from a missing chapter of Mad Max or Thunderdome.
Anyone wanting a glimpse into post-apocalyptic motor sports only need to browse a KLR 650 forum. If you are looking for magic mushrooms, a semi-social character in a shack in the desert might be a good place to look. For bearings, stick to the more industrial areas, like a bonafide parts house. If you open some dictionaries to the word "Hyperbole", they show a picture of a KLR 650.

All bearings aren't created equal. Most reviews on bearings in the motorcycle world are not much more than acknowledgment that the bearings were cheap, fit in the hole, and did not interfere with the wheels ability to spin. All of this determined before the bike was removed from the lift. You will read where these same review submitters replace those bearings every other year or more often. A good tool steel grade bearing will outlast the motorcycle they were installed in, with a little maintenance.

MAINTENANCE???? But they're SEALED. We can't do no stinkin' maintenance on a sealed bearing! Why is he saying these things!??
Well, the first words that will cross any old school Millwright's lips will be "Bullshit". These are "sealed" bearings and they have plastic covers inserted between the outer race and the inner. These seals can be [carefully] pried out with a small screwdriver, even when they are still installed in the wheel. There is controversy about quantity of grease in a sealed bearing, regarding the amount affecting cooling. A boxers or briefs situation. Another controversial topic regarding sealed bearing and grease is the use of synthetic grease. I don't use synthetic grease in these app's. The seals are not good enough to contain the synthetic products if the bearings get hot enough. An example is using synthetic oil in an old engine. It is common for older engines to spew oil all over when switched to synthetic oil, as the old seals that were adequate for retaining dino oil, were not up to retaining the synthetic oil. In the bearing application, should the heated synthetic grease in the bearing escape, you will be running a dry bearing. For a while, anyway. Not long.


ALL bearings are metric, so you can buy replacements at any auto parts store or bearing supplier. There are, of course, varying degree of quality bearings, and I'm of the opinion that this is not the place to save 3 bucks. Their size is marked on the sides of the outer race and is represented by three sets of numbers [outer race outside diameter x inner race inside diameter x width] in millimeters. If they are un-readable and there is not a vernier caliper handy, remove and take the old one with you to be matched up. Better yet, take the old one along anyway.
You can cross reference just about any bearing using the stamped catalog number [on the body or inner race] to a high quality, high shock load bearing, corrosive resistant, wear resistant bearing and they aren't that expensive. Sealed bearings usually have 2RS as a suffix to the size number, as in "6203 2RS".

This is not about "American Pride" or China bashing. It is about corner carving, and having to describe the outcome using the words "wheel bearing" and "catastrophic failure" in the same sentence. And new threads that compare the deductibles of various insurance carriers for skin grafts. There won't be $15.00 difference between the cheap bearings and the better quality bearings, and once you factor in shipping, the local bearings will only be a few dollars more. The chances of Fred showing up at my door to save my bacon is as likely as Scarlett Johansson creating a disturbance by beating on my back door, begging for a second chance. The chances of catastrophic failure of a Chinese bearing is much higher than that of a high quality, tool grade steel bearing from the local NAPA.
 
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