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Don't know any Aussies or mechanics down here that install them. Our temps are as extreme as the northern hemisphere, possibly more hotter. From what I have been told and word of the dealerships down here, is that they don't fail down under. Must be how we ride the KLR, look after them and conditions we ride in. There was a old mechanic who worked for Kawasaki in Japan for years now lives in Melbourne who said it was Eagle Mike himself who started the rumour and built up the hype around swapping it out and the doohickey as well. Just making more business for himself. Just my two cents.
 

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Aftermarket parts and installations don't void the warranty. Read the Magnuson-Moss-Warranty-Act.
Now, should you install a part incorrectly and subsequently suffer an engine damage from that part, it should go without saying that the manufacturer doesn't have to cover that fault in their warranty.
Bingo, the KLR is simple to work on and a very reliable engine. However when people start tinkering with it get it massively wrong and break something then expect warranty to fix it. Huffing and puffing saying it was like that. If you are cracking the engine case to dona doohickey then there is risk. If you are working with cooling and get it wrong then major issues.
Everyone has different opinions about what needs to be done to thier KLR. everyone is different and rides differently and treats there KLR differently. Just voicing my thoughts and experiences from all the Aussie mechanics and dealings I have had with them. Will say that it is definitely a North America dilemma surrounding the KLR.

One member on here, from America, did say this and I agree. Stop spending money on modding the KLR, just ride it. Get to know the bike.

Half the issues with bike owners, especially new ones is, they buy the wrong motorcycle. All motorcycles have thier bugs and issues. Just need to accept some and if you can live with them. But won't know that from on paper, get out and ride the bike. Ride it properly and how you expect to ride it. If it doesn't feel right or can do what you want it too, don't expect to modify it and make it everything you want. Try other bikes first.
 

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Well worded and I agree with the bulk of your post. People SHOULD ride first and modify later and people should also try other bikes. Nobody should modify their bike because people on the internet say they have to........ and there isn't a single modification that is NECESSARY in every case except perhaps the Gen1 Doohickey. That said there is nothing wrong with modifying any bike to be better for you depending on your wants, needs, usage, expectations and budget.......and in my case I like modifying my bikes; keeps me out of the bar, I enjoy it and can afford it. You are also correct in that some people shouldn't touch a wrench......I mean if someone can't install a Thermobob without screwing up.....maybe take up bird watching....or golf. :LOL:

I rode my KLR bone stock for almost 10 years before I started upgrading it. I also have owned 47 motorcycles in my life so far, so I have a pretty good idea what the KLR is and isn't. Some people want it to be a 60hp rocketship or capable of being competitive in a national enduro, or try to get it down to 300lbs......none of those things are really achievable. BUT I view the KLR as a bit of a blank canvass; a 1980's dual purpose bike hampered by budget parts and excess porkage......but with a few well conceived modifications, it can perform surprisingly well and I'll argue to the ends of the earth that there are some changes that are truly transformative for the KLR; like suspension mods, for eg. The KLR really CAN be a decent bike that can compare favorably to much more expensive and modern bikes depending on the mission.....with the right upgrades.



Dave
Very well said
 

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Many owners do wait until after the warranty period is over to alter anything engine related.

But if the installation of a Thermo-Bob is going to help with longevity or reduce the possibility of oil consumption it is best to improve the system as soon as possible.
Get the Entire engine as fully warmed-up as possible, as quickly as possible, not just the the Too Cool of oem thermostat (160F). 190-230F engine temp dries the cold start condensation from the engine quicker & more completely.
Modern engine oils lubricate best at these higher temps and the KLR crankcase is One Giant Oil Cooler, especially in ambient temps below 70F.

As long as a Thermo-Bob installation is performed properly/correctly, it will not void the factory warranty.
Hit the nail on the head at the end. If installed correctly. Aussie dealers will look for any reason not to touch a modified bike.
 

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I have a Gen 1 engine on my workbench. Got it as a practice engine to work on before I got my Gen3. It has 198,000km on it. No Doohickey, No T-Bob either and was running smooth and perfect. The owner had it since new, went all around Australia multiple times. Never had an issue and he rode it hard with a lot of gear. I have taken it apart and rebuilt it several times, all parts in tact.
Will comment on a previous post, no we dont have full access to wholesale parts, lots of American parts get shipped here on order. our dealerships just have never needed them. Must be a different batch of bikes that get sent to Australia? I know Japan send different models to different markets.
From all the mechanics I have spoken to, over 50 from dealerships, and all the Aussie riders I have toured with and they had KLR motorcycles, never not one issue with the engine and not one installed the doo or T-Bob.
 

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That doesn't make any sense. Why rebuild a perfectly good engine MULTIPLE times when it runs and ALL parts are intact ?
Did you ever measure the roundness of the cylinder ?
Because the engine was cheap to buy, I wanted a work bench engine to work on and as I was getting a KLR it made a lot of sense. Now if something breaks on mine can double check the procedure on the practice engine before going to the bike. Roundness was spot on. He replaced the rings a couple times.
 

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For every video on saying replace the Doo there is one to say leave it as it is fine and kawasaki have upgraded the strength of it. What to listen too?
What about your service manual, your engine speed and road speed? Comes down to how you ride the bike and service it. If you ride hard, treat your bike poorly then it will have issues. If you look after it then it will reward you by keep on going. In saying that though, I have seen some postie bikes and XT500 bikes that have been beaten into the ground and still going.
 

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It's been well known that performing the 'factory' recommended doohickey adjustment is typically when the failure shows itself. It's also known that 'a lot' of owners/dealers 'never' perform the adjustment which means your not likely to know there is a problem for many many miles.

How does one explain the literal 'pile' of broken levers and springs in that video starring Eagle Mike. Some of the bikes those came from were well under 10k miles. I have the first hand experience in both Gen1 & Gen2 bikes and the damage it can cause. It's literally "one day your fine, the next day your not".

Similarly, in the video PDWESTMAN posted earlier the man states he has seen a pile of broken doohickeys over the years.

If you don't want to perform the upgrade that's your decision but, I'd recommend you don't perform the adjustment then.

Based on your prior post about 'rebuilding' a gen1 bench engine you've atleast seen how 'sloppy' the fit is on the factory lever. Additionally, can you say how much spring tension was left when you removed it last? Most springs are coil bound regardless of whether or not everything is still intact. Just food for thought. Best wishes
Can respect your thoughts and experiences. Just going off mine and the mechanics I have spoken too. Again everyone rides there bike differently. I will say though when it comes to the doo, I will adjust it, but not to the insane torque that kawasaki recommend. Can say though that I do believe that we don't push the KLR as hard as they are pushed in America, the conditions are completely different so they are not comparable.
 
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