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2022 Kawasaki KLR650
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Aftermarket parts and installations don't void the warranty. Read the Magnuson-Moss-Warranty-Act.
Now, should you install a part incorrectly and subsequently suffer an engine damage from that part, it should go without saying that the manufacturer doesn't have to cover that fault in their warranty.
Bingo, the KLR is simple to work on and a very reliable engine. However when people start tinkering with it get it massively wrong and break something then expect warranty to fix it. Huffing and puffing saying it was like that. If you are cracking the engine case to dona doohickey then there is risk. If you are working with cooling and get it wrong then major issues.
Everyone has different opinions about what needs to be done to thier KLR. everyone is different and rides differently and treats there KLR differently. Just voicing my thoughts and experiences from all the Aussie mechanics and dealings I have had with them. Will say that it is definitely a North America dilemma surrounding the KLR.

One member on here, from America, did say this and I agree. Stop spending money on modding the KLR, just ride it. Get to know the bike.

Half the issues with bike owners, especially new ones is, they buy the wrong motorcycle. All motorcycles have thier bugs and issues. Just need to accept some and if you can live with them. But won't know that from on paper, get out and ride the bike. Ride it properly and how you expect to ride it. If it doesn't feel right or can do what you want it too, don't expect to modify it and make it everything you want. Try other bikes first.
 

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Bingo, the KLR is simple to work on and a very reliable engine. However when people start tinkering with it get it massively wrong and break something then expect warranty to fix it. Huffing and puffing saying it was like that. If you are cracking the engine case to dona doohickey then there is risk. If you are working with cooling and get it wrong then major issues.
Everyone has different opinions about what needs to be done to thier KLR. everyone is different and rides differently and treats there KLR differently. Just voicing my thoughts and experiences from all the Aussie mechanics and dealings I have had with them. Will say that it is definitely a North America dilemma surrounding the KLR.

One member on here, from America, did say this and I agree. Stop spending money on modding the KLR, just ride it. Get to know the bike.

Half the issues with bike owners, especially new ones is, they buy the wrong motorcycle. All motorcycles have thier bugs and issues. Just need to accept some and if you can live with them. But won't know that from on paper, get out and ride the bike. Ride it properly and how you expect to ride it. If it doesn't feel right or can do what you want it too, don't expect to modify it and make it everything you want. Try other bikes first.
Well worded and I agree with the bulk of your post. People SHOULD ride first and modify later and people should also try other bikes. Nobody should modify their bike because people on the internet say they have to........ and there isn't a single modification that is NECESSARY in every case except perhaps the Gen1 Doohickey. That said there is nothing wrong with modifying any bike to be better for you depending on your wants, needs, usage, expectations and budget.......and in my case I like modifying my bikes; keeps me out of the bar, I enjoy it and can afford it. You are also correct in that some people shouldn't touch a wrench......I mean if someone can't install a Thermobob without screwing up.....maybe take up bird watching....or golf. :LOL:

I rode my KLR bone stock for almost 10 years before I started upgrading it. I also have owned 47 motorcycles in my life so far, so I have a pretty good idea what the KLR is and isn't. Some people want it to be a 60hp rocketship or capable of being competitive in a national enduro, or try to get it down to 300lbs......none of those things are really achievable. BUT I view the KLR as a bit of a blank canvass; a 1980's dual purpose bike hampered by budget parts and excess porkage......but with a few well conceived modifications, it can perform surprisingly well and I'll argue to the ends of the earth that there are some changes that are truly transformative for the KLR; like suspension mods, for eg. The KLR really CAN be a decent bike that can compare favorably to much more expensive and modern bikes depending on the mission.....with the right upgrades.



Dave
 

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A Short T bob post;

Short answer: NO you don't NEED one, YES it's much better than the stock system. It's purpose isn't to make warm-ups quicker, it does two main things: 1) it greatly reduces the delta T between incoming and outgoing coolant in the cylinder (from 100+ deg F to 10-15 deg F) which reduces "cold shocking" the cylinder and may reduce heat related bore distortion. 2) it raises the minimum temps the engine sees after warm-up to maintain the oil at a better temperature to boil off condensation, etc. it does not have a significant impact to the maximum temperatures the engine sees which is a function of the coolant flow, capacity, radiator, etc. Read: http://watt-man.com/uploads/TB_Testing.pdf
 

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Well worded and I agree with the bulk of your post. People SHOULD ride first and modify later and people should also try other bikes. Nobody should modify their bike because people on the internet say they have to........ and there isn't a single modification that is NECESSARY in every case except perhaps the Gen1 Doohickey. That said there is nothing wrong with modifying any bike to be better for you depending on your wants, needs, usage, expectations and budget.......and in my case I like modifying my bikes; keeps me out of the bar, I enjoy it and can afford it. You are also correct in that some people shouldn't touch a wrench......I mean if someone can't install a Thermobob without screwing up.....maybe take up bird watching....or golf. :LOL:

I rode my KLR bone stock for almost 10 years before I started upgrading it. I also have owned 47 motorcycles in my life so far, so I have a pretty good idea what the KLR is and isn't. Some people want it to be a 60hp rocketship or capable of being competitive in a national enduro, or try to get it down to 300lbs......none of those things are really achievable. BUT I view the KLR as a bit of a blank canvass; a 1980's dual purpose bike hampered by budget parts and excess porkage......but with a few well conceived modifications, it can perform surprisingly well and I'll argue to the ends of the earth that there are some changes that are truly transformative for the KLR; like suspension mods, for eg. The KLR really CAN be a decent bike that can compare favorably to much more expensive and modern bikes depending on the mission.....with the right upgrades.



Dave
Very well said
 

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Nobody would wait until the 12 month warranty is up?
Many owners do wait until after the warranty period is over to alter anything engine related.

But if the installation of a Thermo-Bob is going to help with longevity or reduce the possibility of oil consumption it is best to improve the system as soon as possible.
Get the Entire engine as fully warmed-up as possible, as quickly as possible, not just the the Too Cool of oem thermostat (160F). 190-230F engine temp dries the cold start condensation from the engine quicker & more completely.
Modern engine oils lubricate best at these higher temps and the KLR crankcase is One Giant Oil Cooler, especially in ambient temps below 70F.

As long as a Thermo-Bob installation is performed properly/correctly, it will not void the factory warranty.
 

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Many owners do wait until after the warranty period is over to alter anything engine related.

But if the installation of a Thermo-Bob is going to help with longevity or reduce the possibility of oil consumption it is best to improve the system as soon as possible.
Get the Entire engine as fully warmed-up as possible, as quickly as possible, not just the the Too Cool of oem thermostat (160F). 190-230F engine temp dries the cold start condensation from the engine quicker & more completely.
Modern engine oils lubricate best at these higher temps and the KLR crankcase is One Giant Oil Cooler, especially in ambient temps below 70F.

As long as a Thermo-Bob installation is performed properly/correctly, it will not void the factory warranty.
Hit the nail on the head at the end. If installed correctly. Aussie dealers will look for any reason not to touch a modified bike.
 

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Many owners do wait until after the warranty period is over to alter anything engine related.

But if the installation of a Thermo-Bob is going to help with longevity or reduce the possibility of oil consumption it is best to improve the system as soon as possible.
Get the Entire engine as fully warmed-up as possible, as quickly as possible, not just the the Too Cool of oem thermostat (160F). 190-230F engine temp dries the cold start condensation from the engine quicker & more completely.
Modern engine oils lubricate best at these higher temps and the KLR crankcase is One Giant Oil Cooler, especially in ambient temps below 70F.

As long as a Thermo-Bob installation is performed properly/correctly, it will not void the factory warranty.
To those who worry about doing anything to your bike "until the warranty runs out", keep in mind, it is the responsibility of the Mfg. to show the/a failure was the result of a DEFECT in workmanship and/or materials! If you run into an issue, ASK FOR A COPY OF THE FAILURE ANALYSIS DOCUMENTATION! They gotta have this for the Mfg. company to file a warranty claim. If they did a tear down of something where there was even the SLIGHTEST chance of it being warranty, it IS in THEIR best interest to follow procedure and to properly evaluate & document the findings. If it's the owners fault, they get billed. If it's a DEFECT.... the Mfg. is 100% on the hook for the repair(s)!

If you like a bone stock Bike, more power to ya!

If you want the first nitrous injected, turbo charged KLR1000 SINGLE so be it!

That being said.... to each his own. Different strokes for different folks. Don't try to screw the dealer and do NOT let the dealer screw you!!! We all work way too hard for our dollars these days!

Willie
 

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Full disclosure.... I was a wrench for many years, Owned & Operated my own Equipment Dealership for awhile, was a Distributor Service Manager supporting a Dealer Network for a 5 state area and then worked for about 15 years at an equipment Mfg. where I provided Technical Support to the Global Distribution Network for a portion of the companies product line before I finished up in the WARRANTY department where I performed WARRANTY CLAIM adjudication & failure analysis.

Yup.... I can bore the crap out of anyone on the topic of Warranty!!! ;)

Willie
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Thanks for the input everyone. I'm probably going to get it on there this weekend, I've got a good chunk of time and it's not too cold out in the garage yet...
 

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Hit the nail on the head at the end. If installed correctly. Aussie dealers will look for any reason not to touch a modified bike.
I'll bet those same Aussie dealers will Gladly sell any motorcyclist any and all aftermarket parts they can provide, yes?
Will they install those same aftermarket mufflers, FI controllers, big bore kits, clutch kits themselves?
If so whats the difference?

The only difference that I see, is that the Aussie Dealers don't have ready access to the Thermo-Bob & Doo-Hickey w/torsion spring kits at a Wholesale price level! Well, neither do USA or Canada dealers.
But if a dealership or repair facility is willing to order them or better yet, stock them shouldn't they/couldn't they make a profit on them?
 

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You don't need the T-Bob or the Doo on the '22. That rhymes. Pretty cool.

But if you want to install them for peace of mind, do it. It's no different that putting good handguards or crash bars on your bike.

From a former KLR outsider looking in, and from many other non-KLR owners, we all wonder why the T-Bob and the Doo create such passionate discussion among KLR owners. I've met a few owners and the first thing they ask me: "Have you installed the T-Bob and the Doo?" And when I say No, they ask why not? Like I was stupid for waiting. :rolleyes: After a while, it gets tiring having to seemingly justify my choices. There's an insinuation that if I don't install these parts, my bike will die.

Let me just say that if my '22 KLR's engine fails because I did not install the Bob and Doo, then screw Kawasaki for making a shit engine! I will sell it for parts and move on to another brand. Great excuse to get a Honda Transalp 750. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Fair enough but you have to try pretty hard to mess up a T bob install....

Dave
That's putting a lot of faith in the gene pool! ;)

Willie
 

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You don't need the T-Bob or the Doo on the '22. That rhymes. Pretty cool.

But if you want to install them for peace of mind, do it. It's no different that putting good handguards or crash bars on your bike.

From a former KLR outsider looking in, and from many other non-KLR owners, we all wonder why the T-Bob and the Doo create such passionate discussion among KLR owners. I've met a few owners and the first thing they ask me: "Have you installed the T-Bob and the Doo?" And when I say No, they ask why not? Like I was stupid for waiting. :rolleyes: After a while, it gets tiring having to seemingly justify my choices. There's an insinuation that if I don't install these parts, my bike will die.

Let me just say that if my '22 KLR's engine fails because I did not install the Bob and Doo, then screw Kawasaki for making a shit engine! I will sell it for parts and move on to another brand. Great excuse to get a Honda Transalp 750. :ROFLMAO:
The Tbob is helpful but isn't as absolutely necessary as the Doo, just ask me how I know...
Gas Motor vehicle Nut Nickel Rim

Tints and shades Art Paint Snow Wood

Every machine has some type of design flaw, just be happy that there are good folks who have identified the KLR flaws and produced quality remedies already.

I will sell it for parts
That's precisely what I had to do with my 2012 after the doo failed and took out the left side of the engine along with the head/valvetrain.

I believe that so many folks adamantly recommend those mods because they are trying to save a fellow owner the heartache and financial heartburn to follow. Best wishes either way
 

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You don't need the T-Bob or the Doo on the '22. That rhymes. Pretty cool.
Check back in, in another 40 - 60k miles if you even keep your bike that long.

Slightly modified and with proper maintenance the KLR650 engine can last 150,000 - 200,000 miles without rebuilding.
All of the OEM doo springs (1987-2023) will run out of travel long before then. That is when balancer system damage begins to occur. Continued operation with a loose balancer chain can become catastrophic.
 

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Check back in, in another 40 - 60k miles if you even keep your bike that long.
30k is my absolute limit in keeping these bikes. I'll put that on the bike in about 3 years. I ride too much. My '22 is right at 10k miles in 10 months. So 1k/month.

I find the value takes a nose dive after 25k miles. I don't buy these as investments, but a springboard to the next bike. So value does matter, and time and miles erode that very quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Check back in, in another 40 - 60k miles if you even keep your bike that long.

Slightly modified and with proper maintenance the KLR650 engine can last 150,000 - 200,000 miles without rebuilding.
All of the OEM doo springs (1987-2023) will run out of travel long before then. That is when balancer system damage begins to occur. Continued operation with a loose balancer chain can become catastrophic.
I tend to own vehicles until I run them into the ground (or until someone totals the car, I am still salty about the person who rear ended me in my 2002 Subaru WRX that I had 185,000 faultless miles on...grrr), so I am definitely on the side of proactive improvements if they're out there.
 

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So value does matter,
One of the best 'value added' statements when selling a KLR is when you can honestly say "YES" to the prospective buying that's asking you "has the Doo been done"? I promise it'll help your chances of getting a fair value for the bike.
 

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I am still salty about the person who rear ended me in my 2002 Subaru WRX
Ah man, that's a bummer, what a sweet car. Always wanted to own one.
 

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Don't know any Aussies or mechanics down here that install them. Our temps are as extreme as the northern hemisphere, possibly more hotter. From what I have been told and word of the dealerships down here, is that they don't fail down under. Must be how we ride the KLR, look after them and conditions we ride in. There was a old mechanic who worked for Kawasaki in Japan for years now lives in Melbourne who said it was Eagle Mike himself who started the rumour and built up the hype around swapping it out and the doohickey as well. Just making more business for himself. Just my two cents.
I have to agree with you sir,, I have owned 3 KLRs, (just bought a 22" and have already put 13k on it) I rode the hell out of the last 2 in cold and extremely hot weather and never had an issue with temp fluctuation that caused any premature engine wear or issues. I don't think the Thermo Bob is a necessary addition or trust me I would buy one"
As far as the doohickey.... yes they can fail and with certain years it's more common, but I can't say for sure that it's something that has to be upgraded ? only because my last 2 KLRs had 67,000 and 55,000 k miles on them before I sold, and the doo was never replaced nor did it fail....
 
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