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Will comment on a previous post, no we dont have full access to wholesale parts, lots of American parts get shipped here on order. our dealerships just have never needed them. Must be a different batch of bikes that get sent to Australia? I know Japan send different models to different markets.
From all the mechanics I have spoken to, over 50 from dealerships, and all the Aussie riders I have toured with and they had KLR motorcycles, never not one issue with the engine and not one installed the doo or T-Bob.
IMO, this is possibly the worst non-USA balancer chain video on YouTube, because he blames the wrong parts initially.

I'll try to find his #2 video where he corrects himself.


IMO, this is one of the best non-USA balancer chain videos on YouTube,

They all came from here,
 

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I Bob'd mine after just a couple hundred miles. The thing just didn't get warm enough on cool days ( 40 -50F) . I noticed moisture in the oil sight window and knew my oil was never getting up to boil off temp. After installing it the bike warms up faster and more evenly ( rad warms as the engine does so so cold coolant shock when the thermostat opens) My temp gauge now lives in one constant place on the dial and doesn't fluctuate down and up at all. The KLR engine is a giant heat sink and unless you are riding in the deep south or summer in the desert, IMO the thermobob is a must and Kawasaki engineers should have been slapped for not designing the cooling system with it to begin with. I never bothered with the doohicky as I decided to trade mine on a 2023 Versys1000. I am now too old to ride off road and the Versys will let me still ride the dirt roads and also go interstate in both speed and comfort. That Versys didn't come cheap though!
 

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That doesn't make any sense. Why rebuild a perfectly good engine MULTIPLE times when it runs and ALL parts are intact ?
Did you ever measure the roundness of the cylinder ?
Because the engine was cheap to buy, I wanted a work bench engine to work on and as I was getting a KLR it made a lot of sense. Now if something breaks on mine can double check the procedure on the practice engine before going to the bike. Roundness was spot on. He replaced the rings a couple times.
 

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For every video on saying replace the Doo there is one to say leave it as it is fine and kawasaki have upgraded the strength of it. What to listen too?
What about your service manual, your engine speed and road speed? Comes down to how you ride the bike and service it. If you ride hard, treat your bike poorly then it will have issues. If you look after it then it will reward you by keep on going. In saying that though, I have seen some postie bikes and XT500 bikes that have been beaten into the ground and still going.
 

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Comes down to how you ride the bike and service it
It's been well known that performing the 'factory' recommended doohickey adjustment is typically when the failure shows itself. It's also known that 'a lot' of owners/dealers 'never' perform the adjustment which means your not likely to know there is a problem for many many miles.

How does one explain the literal 'pile' of broken levers and springs in that video starring Eagle Mike. Some of the bikes those came from were well under 10k miles. I have the first hand experience in both Gen1 & Gen2 bikes and the damage it can cause. It's literally "one day your fine, the next day your not".

Similarly, in the video PDWESTMAN posted earlier the man states he has seen a pile of broken doohickeys over the years.

If you don't want to perform the upgrade that's your decision but, I'd recommend you don't perform the adjustment then.

Based on your prior post about 'rebuilding' a gen1 bench engine you've atleast seen how 'sloppy' the fit is on the factory lever. Additionally, can you say how much spring tension was left when you removed it last? Most springs are coil bound regardless of whether or not everything is still intact. Just food for thought. Best wishes
 

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It's been well known that performing the 'factory' recommended doohickey adjustment is typically when the failure shows itself. It's also known that 'a lot' of owners/dealers 'never' perform the adjustment which means your not likely to know there is a problem for many many miles.

How does one explain the literal 'pile' of broken levers and springs in that video starring Eagle Mike. Some of the bikes those came from were well under 10k miles. I have the first hand experience in both Gen1 & Gen2 bikes and the damage it can cause. It's literally "one day your fine, the next day your not".

Similarly, in the video PDWESTMAN posted earlier the man states he has seen a pile of broken doohickeys over the years.

If you don't want to perform the upgrade that's your decision but, I'd recommend you don't perform the adjustment then.

Based on your prior post about 'rebuilding' a gen1 bench engine you've atleast seen how 'sloppy' the fit is on the factory lever. Additionally, can you say how much spring tension was left when you removed it last? Most springs are coil bound regardless of whether or not everything is still intact. Just food for thought. Best wishes
Can respect your thoughts and experiences. Just going off mine and the mechanics I have spoken too. Again everyone rides there bike differently. I will say though when it comes to the doo, I will adjust it, but not to the insane torque that kawasaki recommend. Can say though that I do believe that we don't push the KLR as hard as they are pushed in America, the conditions are completely different so they are not comparable.
 

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IMO, this is one of the best non-USA balancer chain videos on YouTube,
I don't understand the yellow-shirted mechanic's (Jurgen's?) explanation for why the torsion spring is better than the coil spring. He seems to say that once the doo's adjustment bolt is tightened, there's no longer any pressure on the torsion spring. I just don't see how that can be true. Locking the doo in place with the adjustment bolt does stop either type of spring from being able to move the doo any further, but it doesn't stop them from exerting a force on the doo, even if it is not enough to overcome the bolt pressure on the doo. The only time that isn't the case is when the spring is broken or it is so fatigued that it can no longer apply any force to the doo. And I thought the latter was the real advantage to the torsion spring - it doesn't fatigue in the same manner as the coil spring and will continue to allow for adjustment longer than a coil spring is able to.

...good how-to video otherwise.
 

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but not to the insane torque that kawasaki recommend
To each their own but, that has nothing to do with the failures we're discussing.
Can say though that I do believe that we don't push the KLR as hard as they are pushed in America, the conditions are completely different so they are not comparable.
Again, this has no bearing on how sloppy the tolerance is on the lever/shaft nor anything to do with the coil bound springs. Keep in mind when the 'locking bolt' is tightened all of the parts in question are not moving. It's not until the bolt is loosened that the parts begin to move and reduce slack. That's typically when the failure shows itself unbeknownst to the owner/mechanic.
 
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What to listen too?
Well, I'd suggest post #49! :LOL:

As I said previously, I took mine apart after 15,000 miles and found the lever in 3 pces and the spring in 2....took me a whole weekend with a magnet on a wire to find all the pces. On my other KLR I took it apart at 600 miles (nope, not broken yet!) in order to save me the gigantic PITA I went through on my first one. I didn't just imagine it was broken so I don't know what to tell you; they break. I keep my broken doo lever on my keychain as a reminder to not give in to confirmation bias; I should have checked it much earlier but was convinced it was all an internet myth....


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I installed mine at 43 miles and haven't burned a drop of oil in 7K miles, even after many hours of highway riding above 5K RPM. Do it ASAP, bc what it's supposed to prevent is the cylinder insert from getting out of round. Once that happens, from my understanding, the cylinder and piston need replacing to fix it.
 

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I think the problem is that the camps are intrenched. One camp says YES otherwise engine failure. The other camp says NO because there is little evidence to suggest all engines will fail without. Can't we just occupy the middle ground and say: Do the Doo + Bob if you want. If you don't want, it's ok. Just enjoy the bike as is. Let's not be so rigid about our positions.

Personally, I do believe the Bob is worthwhile for more even temps in cold weather. But I'm not going to push anyone to install it. It's up to each owner.
 

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I think the problem is that the camps are intrenched. One camp says YES otherwise engine failure. The other camp says NO because there is little evidence to suggest all engines will fail without. Can't we just occupy the middle ground and say: Do the Doo + Bob if you want. If you don't want, it's ok. Just enjoy the bike as is. Let's not be so rigid about our positions.

Personally, I do believe the Bob is worthwhile for more even temps in cold weather. But I'm not going to push anyone to install it. It's up to each owner.
I don't think I'm entrenched at all; the last thing I say in my standard doo post is: A KLR, especially a Gen2 can live for quite awhile without even acknowledging the counterbalance adjuster.....but it's still a weak link that is worth replacing if you want some piece of mind.

I agree; it's up to the Owner. The problem stems from when said Owner comes here to get opinions on whether to "do the doo" or not and here's some information that may be incorrect. Saying the levers or springs don't break is a good example; clearly they do break and many of us here have first hand proof of it.

The T bob is even less imperative from the perspective that not having one won't cause any immediate or catastrophic failure.......I think it makes for a better cooling system and the science/physics behind it is sound but who knows if I'll ever put enough miles on my KLR's for it to matter before I can't ride anymore.


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many of us here have first hand proof of it.
This is the main point. Those of us advocating 'for' it have the 'experience' of it happening. Those arguments against it typically DO NOT have the 'first hand' experience. Therefore they are spreading misleading information about whether it's important or not. If I was a new owner I'd be listening to the ones with experience in the matter.

Would you take marital advice from someone who's never been married?? Only if it fits into one's 'confirmation bias' I suppose.....

Best wishes
 
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IMO, this is one of the best non-USA balancer chain videos on YouTube,
I don't understand the yellow-shirted mechanic's (Jurgen's?) explanation for why the torsion spring is better than the coil spring.
I have edited to stress non-USA videos & I agree that Jurgans explanation may actually confuse peoples understanding of the system.

I do feel that Tom Schmitz, aka Souperdoo has the most thorough Doo-Hickey videos going to fully explain the function and differences,
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I don't understand the yellow-shirted mechanic's (Jurgen's?) explanation for why the torsion spring is better than the coil spring. He seems to say that once the doo's adjustment bolt is tightened, there's no longer any pressure on the torsion spring. I just don't see how that can be true. Locking the doo in place with the adjustment bolt does stop either type of spring from being able to move the doo any further, but it doesn't stop them from exerting a force on the doo, even if it is not enough to overcome the bolt pressure on the doo. The only time that isn't the case is when the spring is broken or it is so fatigued that it can no longer apply any force to the doo. And I thought the latter was the real advantage to the torsion spring - it doesn't fatigue in the same manner as the coil spring and will continue to allow for adjustment longer than a coil spring is able to.

...good how-to video otherwise.
Let me try;

On the stock setup, the lever is locked in place by the bolt but the spring is hooked to a separate fitting on the shaft. Due to the fact that the lever fits loosely on the shaft, the shaft can still move (albeit incrementally) and when the shaft moves back and forth a gazillion times, the spring is also moving very slightly and it eventually fatigues and breaks.

With Eaglemike's lever and torsion spring, firstly the EM lever fits much more tightly on the shaft which locks it into place and secondly, the torsion spring is attached to the lever so as long as the lever is locked down the spring can't move at all......it still has tension but it doesn't move.


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the torsion spring is attached to the lever so as long as the lever is locked down the spring can't move at all......it still has tension but it doesn't move
Yes! The "still has tension" is exactly my point. Right around the 9:30 mark Jurgen states that as soon as you clamp the doo in place with the adjuster bolt, there's absolutely no load left on the torsion spring, but the reality is that the spring is not at its free length and it doesn't stop pushing on the doo just because it has been clamped in place. It's maybe a trivial part of the video and the idea of the actual doo issue in general, but it didn't make sense to me when he said it.
 
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Yes! The "still has tension" is exactly my point. Right around the 9:30 mark Jurgen states that as soon as you clamp the doo in place with the adjuster bolt, there's absolutely no load left on the torsion spring, but the reality is that the spring is not at its free length and it doesn't stop pushing on the doo just because it has been clamped in place. It's maybe a trivial part of the video and the idea of the actual doo issue in general, but it didn't make sense to me when he said it.
Stuff like this makes me regret linking Shawn Murray's & Jurgens videos.
I wish that Shawn Murray would DELETE his #1 video completely. Luckily it hasn't caused controversy on this thread, yet!

I only linked both of those Non-USA videos to show "Whitehuntsman" that it is NOT just a USA thing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
So, I just finished installing the Thermobob, after everyone's comments. 12 miles on the odometer. I'm real curious to watch the temp gauge now, since we're solidly in "40 degrees and rain all the time" season in Portland, OR. Got the matching tach installed while I'm already happy with myself for getting the service manual.

Got the doo on order, probably going to do it when I do 600 mile service since I'll be taking it all apart. Thanks everyone for the input.
 
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