Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone help me decide what carb parts to take with me on my Cape Town to Cairo trip this summer?

I am going to be riding at sea level to 3,000 metres. Having read a number of threads I have decided just to leave things stock (partly because that seems to have worked out ok for others doing this and partly because I don't have the wrenching skills!).

However I want to take a carb kit with me just in case. I am probably going to have to use fuel out of a bucket at the side of the road at times so may need to clean out the carb. Also I'd like to have a plan b if the altitude does become a problem (so I can find a local mechanic to help me if needed).

I am therefore thinking I will take a carb service kit (I am also adding an in-line filter) and a smaller main jet. My question is what jet size should I take? The standard one on my bike is a 145 I believe.

Appreciate any guidance you can give (you guys have been great in getting me up to speed on the KLR- thanks).

Cheers
Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,601 Posts
Unless your world-wide itinerary includes Mt. Everest, I'd suggest you forget about altitude-tuning. An excursion of 3000 feet will be accommodated adequately by the KLR650's CV (constant velocity/constant vacuum) design. At higher altitudes, the less-dense air produces less vacuum at velocity, drawing the slide and needle less upwards, thus "fuel-leaning" the air/fuel mixture.

No way loss of power can be avoided at altitude; the CV carb helps provide a more-or-less optimum air/fuel ratio.

Emergency carb repair/rebuild kit? Most carb problems can be solved by cleaning/adjustment; the parts aren't particularly sensitive to wear. Maybe a float valve needle, some gaskets; slide-and-diaphragm if you really want to safe-side things.

Otherwise . . . I'd suggest you swap out the external carburetor cross-head machine screws for Allen-head (hex socket) machine screws; bring the correct-sized Allen key in your tool kit and you'll be able to take the carb apart when it needs attention. Galvanic corrosion tends to stick the stock steel screws in the alloy carb body, making screw removal with conventional screwdrivers (even JIS bits) a challenge.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,206 Posts
Temporaryescapee,
3000m (or roughly 9842.5 feet Damoclese!) will still be ok to travel through with the KLR stock jetting. The KLR is jetted pretty lean to meet emissions and the CKV carb has a somewhat altitude compensating function due to the vacuum operation of the slide and needle assembly. I would rejet if I lived in those altitudes but not just to travel through. I have ridden my 2011 at that and higher altitudes in the Canadian Rockies. Sure there was some power loss but not enough to make it worthwhile to rejet for the short time while traveling.
I think Damoclese's parts recommendation is spot on with emphasis on the slide and diaphragm. It is the most likely to fail but even that is unlikely. People ride these bikes for years without needing one. They most often fail when someone takes the carb apart and installs the diaphragm incorrectly on assembly. Leave it alone and it will last for thousands of miles.
Regards....General JustJeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,601 Posts
That's a good start, Temporaryescape! A few more external machine screws are employed on the carb, but those four are the most critical.

O.K., justjeff, METERS! Since the OP is from the UK, I suppose I must have thought he'd use the BRITISH system of measurement.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,206 Posts
Damocles; O.K. said:
I know! Those darn Frenchmen and their daft metric system! Why can't we all use stones and rods and hogsheads and cubits and leagues and pecks and pennyweights and....
Regards....General JustJeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
The carburetor on a KLR is one of the last things you will need to worry about. No jet changing should be required. I live at sea level and ride up to 13,000 feet (4,000 meters) with no changes. As mentioned the carburetor on the KLR self adjusts for altitude.

I take 10 to 20 thousand mile (16,000 to 32,00km) trips and never take carburetor parts. I have 100,000 miles (160,000km) on one KLR and only had to open the carburetor one time to clean the jets because I let it sit three months with gas in the carburetor. All that was needed was a Phillips and a flat screwdriver. The rubber gasket can be reused.

For suggestions on other items to take, let us know the round trip distance and the year model and mileage on you KLR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks.

my bike is a 2014 with 500kms or so on it. My best guess on distance is another 17,000kms. details of the route and bike are here: https://temporaryescapee.wordpress.com/

Sorry about the French spelling - I have tried to use my best american here but slipped on that one ;-) It gets really confusing when we get into gallons beause our pints have 568mls in them.....

Cheers
Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
Take a pre-oiled air filter in a baggie. That way you can change filters as needed and clean the spare at your convenience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
Andy, your spelling seems better than mine. I see no need to take anything for your carburetor. Nothing in the carburetor wears out or breaks in less then 80,000km or more. Any dirt that gets past your four filters can be cleaned out and the rubber gasket is reusable many ties.

If you install and extra fuel filter, there will be four filters because there two on the petcock in the tank, one for "RUN" and one for "RESERVE". Also there is one in the inlet to the carburetor where the fuel tube connects to the carburetor. Part number 49019 here 2014 Kawasaki KLR650 (KL650EEF) Carburetor(1/3)(US,CN) | CyclePartsNation Kawasaki Parts Nation.
If you decide to use the extra filter, use a sintered metal one rather than a paper one. Also make sure you have a piece of tube to replace it with in case the extra filter causes problems for you. Some times they do.

Some riders carry an extra foam air filter and special cleaner and special oil for the filter. I don't want to give up the space for those things. I just clean the filter with gasoline, squeeze it out, oil it with engine oil and ride on in 30 minutes.

You should plan for a new set of tires along the way. Know where you can get tires that fit or ship them ahead. Carrying tires reduces the pleasure of the trip. Your chain should be good for at lease 20,000 km. I take spare clutch and front brake levers.

You could change oil every 4,500 km or so and take one spare oil filter to change at the second oil change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,601 Posts
.

You should plan for a new set of tires along the way. Know where you can get tires that fit or ship them ahead. Carrying tires reduces the pleasure of the trip. Your chain should be good for at lease 20,000 km. I take spare clutch and front brake levers.
+ 1 on all that; I've never understood the practice of carrying extra tires, as in The Beverly Hillbillies (American TV show) look-alike or Joad family The Grapes of Wrath (American novel about Depression dust-bowl fleeing "Okies") look . . . pre-positioning tires may be in order (17" rear tires are in short supply, in some areas), or having 'em shipped in, if not available locally, but . . . wrestling with spare casings every day, every roll of the wheels?

Chain and sprockets should last for 20,000 miles (that's miles, not kilometers, furlongs, or even varas (for any Texans reading); seems to me a long-distance traveler would START OUT with eminently serviceable chain and sprockets . . . although that's not always the case, it seems. In extreme emergency situations, sprockets may be REVERSED for some additional expedient miles, if necessary.

Spare levers could come in handy; decent handguards (e.g., Tusk version, with metal backbone) may help prevent lever bending/breakage.

Maybe we've already covered proper bash plate. And patches, spare inner tubes. And inflation mechanism. And, tire irons (3 recommended).

Think I mentioned the teeny-tiny lithium booster battery; can be re-charged with 12 VDC or house current (if any of the latter exists in Ethiopia); will re-charge camera, cell phone, computer batteries, as well as start 'most any car or motorcycle encountered.

Bon voyage!

------------------------------

Oops; I (and maybe others) have gone off-topic! The OP asked about carb bits!

Mea culpa; a thousand pardons! Reckon I was trying to slay all the dragons with just one blow; time enough to address separate issues separately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I see no need to take anything for your carburetor. Nothing in the carburetor wears out or breaks in less then 80,000km or more. Any dirt that gets past your four filters can be cleaned out and the rubber gasket is reusable many ties.
great - that makes life easier

If you install and extra fuel filter, there will be four filters because there two on the petcock in the tank, one for "RUN" and one for "RESERVE". Also there is one in the inlet to the carburetor where the fuel tube connects to the carburetor. Part number 49019 here 2014 Kawasaki KLR650 (KL650EEF) Carburetor(1/3)(US,CN) | CyclePartsNation Kawasaki Parts Nation.
I didn't know that - I'll order a couple of those little filters and fit that

If you decide to use the extra filter, use a sintered metal one rather than a paper one. Also make sure you have a piece of tube to replace it with in case the extra filter causes problems for you. Some times they do.
Ok - I have a paper one set aside so will look up the sintered one. Good advice on the pipe. I'd read up about the locking (I built my base plan on Chris Scott's Adventure Motorcycling Handbook, which I am sure you know but is a fantastic resource to get started). I was just planning to try and keep things as cool as possible but spare pipe seems really sensible.

Some riders carry an extra foam air filter and special cleaner and special oil for the filter. I don't want to give up the space for those things. I just clean the filter with gasoline, squeeze it out, oil it with engine oil and ride on in 30 minutes.
Would cut down in space a lot! If I use engine oil do I need to clean/oil the filter more regularly?

You should plan for a new set of tires along the way. Know where you can get tires that fit or ship them ahead. Carrying tires reduces the pleasure of the trip.
NO plans to carry tyres! I am planning to fit Heidenau K60 scout tyres. Lots of reports from folks who have found these tyres can make this distance. That's plan A. Plan B is to get replacement tyres shipped to Addis Ababa. I work with a charity based there so am sure I can ship my tyres to them.

Your chain should be good for at lease 20,000 km. I take spare clutch and front brake levers.
I was originally thinking of changing the chain before I went for a DID one but the advice here was, as you have said, that the OE one will go the distance so I'll just use that. I will take spare levers and will also fit barkbusters.

You could change oil every 4,500 km or so and take one spare oil filter to change at the second oil change.
I am planning services in Zimbabwe (4,400kms), Uganda (8,800kms) and Ethiopia (11,100kms). I am thinking I will take parts (like air filter) but buy oils on the road (I should be able to get these in Harare, Kampala and Addis Ababa respectively.

Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
+ 1 on all that; I've never understood the practice of carrying extra tires, as in The Beverly Hillbillies (American TV show) look-alike or Joad family The Grapes of Wrath (American novel about Depression dust-bowl fleeing "Okies") look . . . pre-positioning tires may be in order (17" rear tires are in short supply, in some areas), or having 'em shipped in, if not available locally, but . . . wrestling with spare casings every day, every roll of the wheels?
Definitely no tyres! Not seen the hillbillies (buy am thinking Deliverance?). The Grapes of Wrath is still on the to read list, but loved reading Tortilla Flats and have ridden through the dust-bowl I think. Lots of miles in 2 weeks on Road King - flew into Phoenix, rode the Rockies up to Laramie, followed a bit of the Oregon trail back east, through the dust bowl?? south to Dodge City, Followed the Santa Fe Trail back, then down to Tombstone and the like before going back to Scotsdale. Loved the trip, my hips hated the Harley!

Chain and sprockets should last for 20,000 miles (that's miles, not kilometers, furlongs, or even varas (for any Texans reading); seems to me a long-distance traveler would START OUT with eminently serviceable chain and sprockets . . . although that's not always the case, it seems. In extreme emergency situations, sprockets may be REVERSED for some additional expedient miles, if necessary.
Learned the hard way on that one in Romania last year....

Spare levers could come in handy; decent handguards (e.g., Tusk version, with metal backbone) may help prevent lever bending/breakage.
set of these waiting to be fitted: Barkbuster Hand Protector Kawasaki KLE 500 / KLR 650 / Versys Kit - Bikegear

along with these:
Oxford Heated Premium Hot Grips - Adventure - FREE UK DELIVERY

Maybe we've already covered proper bash plate. And patches, spare inner tubes. And inflation mechanism. And, tire irons (3 recommended).
Bash plate fitted (SW Motech), 2 spare tubes bought (may take and extra 21", 3 tyre levers bought and will take mini compressor - thinking this (not bought yet) Air Compressor Archives - Bikegear

Am thinking I need to get a beadbreaker too - what are the KLR's like for this?

Think I mentioned the teeny-tiny lithium booster battery; can be re-charged with 12 VDC or house current (if any of the latter exists in Ethiopia); will re-charge camera, cell phone, computer batteries, as well as start 'most any car or motorcycle encountered.
Not looked into this yet but will do

Bon voyage!

------------------------------

Oops; I (and maybe others) have gone off-topic! The OP asked about carb bits!

Mea culpa; a thousand pardons! Reckon I was trying to slay all the dragons with just one blow; time enough to address separate issues separately.
All good advice and greatly appreciated, thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
When I mentioned a tube to replace an extra inline fuel filter, I just meant something to allow you to remove the extra filter if necessary. Sometimes too many filters can cause running problems. Just a short piece of tube that could replace the filter if needed or a little extra length in the fuel line would work.

The timing for cleaning the air filter is totally based on when it gets dirty not distance traveled. I was riding in deep powder dust on a dirt trail across the Nevada desert one night and the bike would not go up a little hill. The filter had about three mm of oily dust on it. I put the filter in a plastic bag, drained some gas into the bag, squeezed it a few times, took the filter out and squeezed it dry, oiled it and went on my way. You should always have some engine oil and some gas with you and you can do without the bag if you have to. Engine oil is actually what Kawasaki recommends for the air filter.

New KLRs come with a DID or EK o-ring chain which are good for the entire trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I am starting ordering my parts now and working through a list I have built with your collective help.

I have got a bit confused with the fuel filter and spare tube. I am trying to order in the UK as far as possible for smaller bits as then I don't need to pay postage or import duty.

The parts list states the fuel tube is "TUBE,FUEL,6.2X13.2X170 CNUS" if I am reading it right. From this I was assuming the internal diameter of the tube is 6.2mm and the external is 13.2m.

However, klr650.com show the filer as 8mm (5/16"). KLR650.com - In-Line Fuel Filter.

The equivalent to this in the uk is (I think) Fuel Filter Inline K&N 7.94mm Inlet and Outlet Can anyone confirm?

Which tube from this list do I want to order to go with it? (I assume 2m worth, with clips) The UK?s biggest choice of motorcycle parts for Japanese and European machines.

Thanks (again) for all your insights, having never seen my bike and being a mechanical novice this site has really been invaluable. I leave 7 weeks today so I'm into final planning now. I will endeavour to pay back some of your investment in me with some photos and footage as I work my way across Africa.

Cheers
Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,601 Posts
Fuel lines, and even in-line filters, are hardly KLR-specific, temporaryescapee, IMHO.

Your friendly local automobile and/or motorcycle parts and accessories store doubtless will have acceptable generic parts quite suitable for your KLR.

One possible difference; I'm unfamiliar with the latter-day fuel filter from Kawasaki (earlier models had none); some adaptation may be required using generic implants.

Hereabouts (US), I think a KLRista would simply buy a length of, "1/4" fuel line," and whatever filter might be appropriately sized.

I doubt you'll exceed the service life of your OEM fuel line and filter on your trip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
............I have got a bit confused with the fuel filter and spare tube. ...........The parts list states the fuel tube is "TUBE,FUEL,6.2X13.2X170 CNUS" .......... From this I was assuming the internal diameter of the tube is 6.2mm ...........However, klr650.com show the filer as 8mm (5/16"). ............The equivalent to this in the uk is (I think) .................. Can anyone confirm?

Which tube from this list do I want to order to go with it? (I assume 2m worth, with clips) The UK?s biggest choice of motorcycle parts for Japanese and European machines.
.........Cheers Andy
You are correct. The stock KLR fuel line is 6.2mm ID. that is 0.244 inches or 1/4". KLR650.com just happens to be selling a filter with a 5/16" OD connection which a 1/4" line should stretch over. The replacement line I am using on my KLR is 1/4" ID Tygon non hardening fuel line from my local auto parts store.

I was just suggesting you carry a piece of copper tube the same length and diameter as your auxiliary fuel filter it you use one and should need to remove it. The only reason for this is that some here say an extra fuel filter may cause flow problems. I have not seen this on my KLRs.

Keep in mind that the OEM filters on the petcock are actually very fine screens which you can back flush if necessary. Also, If the screen/filter on the "ON" side of the petcock should become clogged, you can switch to "RESERVE" and continue on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Looks like an excellent time. I hope you can keep us posted while on the road.
 
  • Like
Reactions: willys
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top