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Discussion Starter #1
I'd seen this video done a while back, and think he did a pretty reasonable test.
threaded insert test
People sometimes say "Timeserts are better" but they don't really know why. Some of it is appearance, and a lot is advertising.

Most people don't know they use the same tap, so the threads and hole are the same size. This is telling in some ways.

The Timesert needs a couple of fairly special tools besides the drill and tap, a counterbore and the special installation tool. On a thinner piece of material like the oil drain hole, the counterbore will cost at least one thread, and there's only about 5 threads there. When one installs the Timesert, you drill the hole to size if needed, counterbore for the head, tap the hole, then screw it in using the special tool. As the head bottoms in the counterbore, the install tool swages or expands the lower portion of the insert out against the parent hole. The inserts come in different lengths, but if the material is thinner than the shortest length (ex: oil drain plug hole) there isn't any material for the insert to expand and lock against to stay on place.

Helicoils also work best with a couple of special tools, but if one is desperate, it can be done without them. You still need a drill and tap. It's easiest if one has the special install tool, but I've gotten by using a modified bolt when someone "borrowed" the tool and forgot to return it, but the agony level is increased. :) So drill, then tap, screw the insert in with the tool so the top is about 1/2 turn below surface, then use a pin to break off the insert tang. The tang is used to drive the insert into the hole. It's best if the pin to break the tang used is about 1/16" smaller than the inside diameter of the insert. (both Timesert and Helicoil kits come with the special tools). The Helicoils also come in different lengths, and can be cut to a custom length to match material thickness if needed.

I used both of them thousands of times, and have both in my stash. The lengths they both come in are multiples of the diameter. Ex: 6mm would be 1 diameter, 1.5 diameter, 2 diameter length are common. 6mm, 9mm, 12mm.

Why do I usually prefer Helicoil? They have proven to be stronger as shown in the testing performed in the video (my personal experience had also indicated this without gauged testing). We used a lot of them in aerospace back when I was in that line of work. They can also be stacked in a hole, if you have a through hole or a deep hole. If the length isn't matching for the Timesert, it won't work. The Helicoil is actually springs out against the hole. The non-expanded portion of the Timesert will stretch as it's stressed, and when they fail, come out of the hole in pieces. Either insert will work fine is used within design parameters.

There are also many other inserts, Keenserts, etc, that are stronger than either of these. These are the repair insert usually used in the KLR, and that's why I brought this up.
I know this is a bit long winded, but might prove useful to someone. Especially the right front cam cover hole. It can be done in place, but it's easier if one doesn't strip in it the first place. Only 55 INCH-lbs, no more. :)
Stay safe my friends!
 

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I've always been a big supporter and user of Helicoil. The link to the test posted above reinforces my favorable opinions about them. However, lately I used OEM to repair some damaged threads in the head on my Aermacchi because it was readily available at an Autozone shop near my house. The OEM thread repair system seems identical in fit, form and function to Helicoil.

Jason
 

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I;ll be honest, i did in my first engines oil drain bolts threads, helicoil to the rescue, good thing Tammy was around to do it right!
 

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Helicoil expert here !
Been a machinist for about 40 years.
In the machine shop I have been at for the 15 years I have machined aircraft parts for Boeing that use Helicoil inserts.
I have installed thousands of inserts mostly with Helicoil pneumatic, electric and manual installers.


First the holes are drilled according to the Helicoil recommendation then a 120 countersink is used then tap with an STI tap.
The Helicoils are then installed 3/4 t0 1 1/2 turns.

Timeserts require more machining and are better for some applications.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've always been a big supporter and user of Helicoil. The link to the test posted above reinforces my favorable opinions about them. However, lately I used OEM to repair some damaged threads in the head on my Aermacchi because it was readily available at an Autozone shop near my house. The OEM thread repair system seems identical in fit, form and function to Helicoil.

Jason
Yes, auto parts stores often sell Helicoil clones. I've helped people use those on a weekend when away from the shop. The install tools in the kits I've used such as "OEM" usually haven't been as good a actual Helicoil brand.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I remember one is the MilSpec numbers for Helicoils is MS33537, the other MS21208 or MS21209 for free running or locking inserts. There were 2 specifications, one for the inserts themselves,and one for the hole dimensions. When I was QC manager, one of my duties was to oversee install in a LOT of parts. These spec's are available on the internet and can be useful at times.
 

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I'm pretty sure that all of Install tools that come the kits just thread into the insert and grab the tang.
There are also tools that pre-wind the inserts for easier installation but are expensive for just installing a couple inserts.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
General note for clarification:
The really cheap kits that are in the auto parts stores just come with a screw handle to drive the tang. It helps a LOT to chamfer or countersink the top of the hole out to the major diameter of the thread plus a little bit, maybe a half millimeter, to help get the insert started into the hole. I've seen many guys have trouble with these because they just don't use them often, and/or the driver is poor quality.
The genuine Helicoil kit in the smaller sizes come with an internally threaded tool (prewinder) in addition to the screw for driving them in. (my stash of 4mm to 12mm all came with them) These more extensive kits cost about $90 instead of the $30 or so of the cheap kits. The more expensive kits require prior planning (hahaha) as they aren't in the parts store, but found in industrial supply houses. The more expensive kits will save headaches and last a lifetime, as long as you get it back every time you loan it out. :) Industrial production install tools can get really expensive, but you won't need those for your klr.
For those that don't know about McMaster-Carr, they are a great supplier for all kinds of stuff. They have a nice website, McMaster.com, pretty easy to find stuff. Their stuff isn't cheap, but they have a great return policy and they always honestly describe their stuff.
 

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McMaster-Carr 👍
Grainier also carries a fair amount of commercial/industrial stuff and I bought Helicoils there one time. They have a lot more locations than McMaster Carr, so you might be able to bop down to their local store and buy what you need.
 

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McMaster-Carr 👍
Grainier also carries a fair amount of commercial/industrial stuff and I bought Helicoils there one time. They have a lot more locations than McMaster Carr, so you might be able to bop down to their local store and buy what you need.
Indeed, "Grainger" and McMaster Carr are excellent sources for quality industrial supplies.

Jason
 
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