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I watched a video last week from one of my favorite YT folks who attended a 2-day course on how to ride an adventure bike off-road.

It was $600 for two days and it looked like some very good advice and techniques being taught. I did notice, however, that none of the students rode a KLR and all of them were on some very expensive bikes.

I know that KLR owners tend to be of more modest means and spending $600, plus another $1000 or so for lodging and other expenses, is out of reach for most of us.

But, I do know of a couple of personal friends that ride KLRs that make easily twice what I do and could afford such training.

I'm curious as to if anyone here has paid for similar training and if they thought it was worth the price. Or, if they thought that good old-fashioned riding, crashing, and learning from your mistakes was better.
 

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I haven't but I know several KLR riders that have and some of my friends have taught riding clinics; it's typically an excellent learning experience and I'd recommend them if you have the means. I learned the hard way but at least I was riding since I was 8 years old so many of the hard lessons were learned at lower speeds and in the dirt.

Dave
 

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I came to off-pavement riding late in life. I needed training. Years ago I took a two day, off road riding course at the BMW training facility in South Carolina. I also paid the extra fee to use one of their bikes. It was expensive but well worth it. I just wish that much of what I learned did not atrophy. I spend more time on the pavement than I wish.
 

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I've been tempted. there is a training company about an hour and a half away but the sessions fill so quick. The problem with self thought is you develop bad techniques that may work. Then you have to unlearn and relearn and that can be frustrating. As said above, if you can, do it. - I should follow my own advise
 

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I know that KLR owners tend to be of more modest means
I’ve got stories to tell you about guys on Goldwings that would give KLR owners a better reputation. $30,000 dollar bikes and too cheap to buy good tires, but I digress.

I haven’t taken any such course on the KLR but many times have thought I would benefit if I did. Didn’t start riding a bike till I was 45 and now when I fall down it takes a little longer to get up.

Did take some advanced riding courses when I had the Goldwing and found them to be of great benefit. Even my wife commented on how much better I was handling the bike. 😆
 
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Yes. I operated YMRacing Road Racing and Street riding school for many years. I was AHRMA, CCS approved for Road Racing. I didn't get there by learning on my own. Attended many courses, raced many races. When I decided I'd like to learn more about off-road.... Cornerspin Road Racing in the Dirt it makes you a better road racer/street rider too..It will hurt you...
 

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I'm curious as to if anyone here has paid for similar training and if they thought it was worth the price.
I haven't, but I would if there were any being held within an eight hour ride of my home, but there is not.
 

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For a more budget minded approach: I'd recommend getting a few legit books on motorcycle riding techniques and read them thoroughly to understand the 'correct' methods as it pertains to your field of riding. Many cross over between dirt/street but some do not..

Then go out and practice said techniques over and over until it becomes "muscle memory". If needed go back to the 'books' for reference.

Hint: When offroad try 'steering' the bike with the footpegs more so than the bars. As well as 'counter lean' to keep your weight over the contact patch.
Best wishes as always
 
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I always want to take dirt bike course but I'm poor and too old. The bike is now my money pit. I'll eat cup ramen for few weeks now so I can afford stator cover and maybe shock rebuild.
If you need a stator cover I have one from a gen2 you can have for 25 plus the shipping. Best
 

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Take the advice to the others here with more experience than I have. Compared to "learning the hard way," the riding courses are much cheaper! You can't just pick it up from a book, you need specific coaching too.

It also matters which course you take. Go with one that has a strong reputation and lots of customer reviews. And choose one for your level of experience, in other words, don't try the advanced course if you're really a beginner/intermediate.
 

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You can't just pick it up from a book,
Speak for yourself. A lot of folks here went to University. YES, we learned a great deal from books.

Practice makes perfect! Good day now. ✌
 

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Practice make permanent. If you want to get really good at doing something the wrong, or less helpful way, then keep practicing it. For physical skills, almost all of us learn better by getting coaching at points along the path, both before we ingrain bad habits, and to learn more advanced skills we develop.

This topic is about physical skills. Do reading books help? Of course (providing the author knows what he is writing about). But you also need to practice the right techniques, which pretty much necessitates some coaching along the way. Do you ski? If so, did you learn it by reading a book? Did you ski better after getting some good lessons?

I don't know what your point is about book learning and going to university. You took one part of one sentence and made it sound like a full statement. "You can't just pick it up from a book," and then you edited out the dependent clause: "you need specific coaching too." That makes the two complementary, not mutually exclusive. THat's a false editing job on your part.
 

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Practice make permanent. If you want to get really good at doing something the wrong, or less helpful way, then keep practicing it
You assume the most published authors are incompetent?

I think most of us know how to cite a credible source. Again, Speak for yourself.

People are smarter than you think. Some of the comments expressed interest in classes however budget is a prohibiting factor. Likewise, not everything taught in a class is 'retained' 100% of the time so unless you can take the instructor home with you to use as a reference, I'd say having a book for reviewing PROPER techniques is beneficial.

Again, good day Sir.
 

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Sheesh. I don't think we disagree on the substance. Re read the thread from PNW Explorer"s initial question. What is your point of contention?
 
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