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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Help! I 'm having network problems. It may seem nuts but I have somewhere around 84 wifi clients connected to my home network. It's a bunch of amazon devices, phones, wall switches, bulbs, ESP8266 chips and sensors. It's all been fine until I hit that over 80 mark. Now things drop out at times. I'm running 2 TP-Link Archer A7 routers. One is an just used as an access point with a few items on it and the other does the heavy lifting. Would it work better if I got some of the stuff moved over to the access point routers wifi or is this just to much for these routers and I need to upgrade my main router? I haven't set many of the items as a static IP either, would that help???

NOTE: My internet speed is 170 Mbps
 

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I would either reserve IP addresses for certain macs, or set static, reserved is probably the better way to go, I would also make sure your DCHP has enough addresses for the number of devices.

I do not have that many, but switching to google mesh seemed to solve all of the connectivity issues I was having with ~50 connected devices.
 

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One router is enough. How many AP's are you using or are you using AP's? My suggestion would be the Google WiFi extenders. Also you can set separate SSID's between 2.5 and 5. Put the devices that can accept slower speed on the 2.5 and the faster devices on the 5.

The Google dots will probably solve the problem easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
One router is enough. How many AP's are you using or are you using AP's? My suggestion would be the Google WiFi extenders. Also you can set separate SSID's between 2.5 and 5. Put the devices that can accept slower speed on the 2.5 and the faster devices on the 5.

The Google dots will probably solve the problem easily.
I'm using the same brand and type of router as just an access point. Only one. It has very few items on it though. I think just three. The main router is downstairs in the "basement" with all the PC's. HDMI cables go to TV's upstairs with wireless keyboards using dongles on USB extensions. That works great. The PC's are all wired to a switch with Cat 7 then to the "main" router. The router set as an access point is wired with cat 6e upstairs.
I think I'll start switching some stuff over to the access point and unload some of the main routers 2.4 radio. It will still have to handle all the IP addresses. I think I just might be taxing the 2.4 on that one router. The only devices on the 5 wifi are two phones and a laptop. All the other stuff only operates on 2.4.

I do have the SSID's for 2.4 and 5 set to different names on both routers so you "see" 4 wifi's plus two guest networks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I would either reserve IP addresses for certain macs, or set static, reserved is probably the better way to go, I would also make sure your DCHP has enough addresses for the number of devices.

I do not have that many, but switching to google mesh seemed to solve all of the connectivity issues I was having with ~50 connected devices.
Checked my addresses and it set so I can have 200.

Looked at Google mush. That may be the way I have to go. My routers specs say it can handle 50 but it's been fine. I wonder if the access point can handle 50 and the router also handle 50.

'm going to move some stuff to the access point and try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I bought the TP-link Deco, too. Its worked very well for us.
Good to know. I'm going to wire the access points so I have some work to do.
 
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