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I'd like to buy heated clothing for my whole body--jacket, pants, socks, possibly gloves. (I may go with heated grips; I'm not sure yet.) Can the battery handle it?
 

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Cabron -

The electrical system on the KLR is weakish, producing about 15 amps or ~180 watts on the pre '08s and 17 amps or ~200 watts on the '08+ models.

So, you need to figure out how much excess power is available to run the suit.
I would guess (but I'm sure someone here knows an accurate figure) that the bike uses ~100 watts to run the headlight, taillight, ignition,charge the battery when it needs it, and so on. these are on all, or much, the time - you don't need to worry about the intermittent stuff like the turn signals, , as the battery will handle the temporary overload.

That leaves 80 - 100 watts to run accessories. How much wattage does a full suit consume?

I think a jacket and pants would draw about 10 amps, or ~120 watts, and that would indicate that the KLR doesn't have quite enough reserve power.

I find that if my upper body is warm that I'm fine down to about 30 degrees with my winter suit, so perhaps a jacket would suffice.

disclaimer: I live in SoCal and wile I often ride in near-freezing temps out in the desert, I don't have heated stuff. Here's your grains of salt >...

Tom
 

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Per the manuals the 2000-07 models make about 238 watts and take 126 watts to run all the lights leaving you with 110 watts to play with. I have a set of driving lights that consume 110 watts and my 05 just can't quite keep up with that much draw. I would say I have about 90-95 watts extra to run accessories. While a jacket may be rated at 90 watts at full power you will likely never pull more than half that much power if you use a digital heat control which cycles the element on and off to obtain the desired level of heat. You should have enough power to run a jacket and heated gloves or grips with a digital controller. Be sure to install a voltmeter to keep track of your power use.
 

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Agreed with the other posters - I've done some testing on volts vs. current draw on my '04 (plot attached) and found it can support about 100 watts of current draw. I ride into the 20's and actually sold my heated vest (77w) because I barely had it running (down on '2' or only 20% duty cycle... ie a net equivalent of 15watts averaged out over time). I run a balaclava, good jacket and pants, and the only electrical heat is 22w for some heated gloves. The question you might want to ask is, do you truly have a need for more than 100 watts at 100% duty cycle? In my case, the answer was 'no'.

Here's the plot.
 

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I have a 2008 and I run a heated jacket and gloves, which consume about 120 watts. I was worried about the consumption so I added a volt meter. I have a solid state controlled for the heated clothing that cycles on and off. The voltage meter will drop from 14 to 12 volts when the clothing cycles on and then goes back up to 14 when it cycles off. The volts will stay at 12 if I am riding slow with the bright lights on and the clothing on high. I seldom run the clothing on high. I just turn off the bright light if I am going slow and have the clothing on fairly high. I've never had a problem. I would suggest adding a voltage meter rather than get a surpise with a dead battery.
 

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I just purchased a heated jacket for use on my 04 klr. I checked the current draw to find out the load. The jacket pulls a maximum of 6 amps but only 50% of the time as the controller applies on-off current. Based on this 3 amps times 13 volts equals 39 watts of power.

Have had no problems using the jacket on long rides.
 

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I have been leaning towards just the heated gloves and insoles to keep the extremities warm.

gloves:http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/1/1/461/10327/ITEM/Tour-Master-Synergy-Heated-Leather-Gloves.aspx

insoles:http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/1/1/461/24017/ITEM/Tour-Master-Electric-Heated-Insole.aspx

The only problem with this is getting power to the insoles since I won`t be wearing a pant liner. Apparently gloves come with: "Synergy™ Gloves include the Power Lead Wiring Harness, Temperature Control Unit and a V-Split Connector (Required when using Synergy™ Gloves with Synergy™ Pant or Vest liners).

Anyone deal with this problem before?
 

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I have heated gloves but prefer the heated grips. Very low power draw. Like others have said, use a digital controller. Also keep in mind you can turn the heat down to minimize draw. The KLR will need some RPMs to keep charging so just be aware if you are in traffic or such. You can also swap your running lights to LEDs to make power available, as well as a digital dash. I have heard lots of folks having reliabilty issues with the higher output stators.
 

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My suggestion, a leather coat big enough to wear a long sleeve T and a Berber pullover from Cabella's, sweat-pants, jeans, and leather outer-leather-pants, heat the grips and mabe the socks, a blaclava and full face, will get you down to riding temps that snowmobikes do......on second thought a snowmobile suit ought to do nicely :)
 

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I use heated jacket and gloves on both my KLR and ST1300. The ST has a lot bigger alternator so it isn't a problem. I was concerned with my 2008 KLR so I put a volt meter on it. I have a solid state pulse control for the jacket and gloves. The volt meter shows the volts drop from 14 to 12 volts when the jacket and gloves come on. It goes right back up to 14 when they go off. I find that it takes a little longer to go back to 14 when I have the headlights on bright. I never have to have the heated cloths on full power and that would drain the battery.

My KLR is a 2008, which has a bigger alternator than the odler models.

Get a volt meter and solid state pulse controller and you won't have any problems.
 

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Interesting, are you guys saying that the controllers simply apply a duty cycle to the entire group of clothing at once? In other words it does not shift from one item to another???You see were I'm going dont you?
If this is the case I could make something that cycles through the items one at a time. You would never over load the system no mater how many items as long as no one item was over the max.

Chaos
 

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1 controller works what ever is connected together and to it. It pulses the heat to all of it at the same time, ie, jacket and gloves. Set it on 1/4 power and it will supply power to the cloths 1/4 of the time.

You can use 2 controllers and set the heat separate for each item.

My jacket has 1 plug to work it and gloves if they are hooked to the jacket. There is also another plug in the jacket that you can disconnect and plug into a separate controller for the gloves so both can be controlled separately.

However, the only thing that counts is how many amp hours you are using. Gloves on high and a jacket on low may have the same draw as both hooked together on medium low. The only way to tell is a voltage gage. If I remember right, my jacket draws 110 watts and the gloves 15 watts.

If I run full power to the gloves and jacket on my 2008, it will run the battery down after a while. I can run them full power for a while and then turn them down and it is OK. The jacket on full power will make me sweat in 10 min.

1 other consideration is your rpm. Running both jacket and gloves at low rpm will run down the battery while running them at a higher rpm will not.
 

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Seems a little knowhow is all thats required.
All these controllers do is pulse a duty cycle through all the loads at once.
If you are output limited this is dumb at best.:46:
Why not switch from one load to another, instead of overtaxing the system by simply pulsing them all together.
Lets say the loads are pants 75 watts, jacket 75 watts gloves and heated grips 75 watts.

My way the draw is 75 watts constant.

There way 225 watts pulsed. (not to mention overloaded its taking a beating)

There is no cumulative effect as you are simply switching between loads as apposed to pulsing all of them to derive your duty cycle.

I.E. instead of turning on and off your pants,jacket and gloves (pulsing)you would have your controller switch between them.
Your overall draw (amp hours) for the amount of heat generated would remain the same, however you could have as many heated clothing items as you wanted and the draw would not go up.

Chaos
 

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It all works out the same. An alternator has a given output. Multiply by time and you know what the output is over time, like how many amp hours it puts out. Take the load amps per hour and compare it to the out put per hour and you will see if the alternator has the abilbity to power the load. If the load exceed the out put your battery will be drained by making up the difference.

So it makes no difference if there is a high load (pulse) for a short time or a smaller load for a long time. The end result is the same.

Making the load switch from one item to another just makes it more complicated and there is no advantage. Everything works best when it is simple.
 

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What?????????

It makes a huge difference.
One way will work with multiple loads and one will not work at all.

If you switch the loads you will not over draw the system at all, as you will no longer be pulling more than its putting out. I.E. no drawn down battery ever as your system will now keep up. This is again assuming that no one item draws more than the available spare output. As you mentioned a voltage gauge helps.

This will only work for heated clothing and it is no more complicated than using the controller that is not working now.(of course I will have to make it)
You are very right about only having so much power to go around, you might as well use what you have wisely.

Chaos
 

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I was refering to electric clothing or something similar. Not running so much you are past the capacity of the system.

You are talking about doing the same thing. The difference is you are pulsing each item separately rather than together. There is no difference and the total draw is the same.

But if it makes you happy and you like to experiment then have fun.
 

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Nice data watt-man. Question though, isn't the steady state of a non-overcharged wet cell battery ~ 12.6VDC ? That is in your graph if you had it all on, I would think the battery would eventually run down or be damaged ?

John (not a battery engineer, but play one on the internet ;-)
 

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Nice data watt-man. Question though, isn't the steady state of a non-overcharged wet cell battery ~ 12.6VDC ? That is in your graph if you had it all on, I would think the battery would eventually run down or be damaged ?

John (not a battery engineer, but play one on the internet ;-)
I don't understand what you are saying.

The Kawa manual says the battery has a capacity of 12 V 14 AH The charging voltage is 13.8 - 14.8 V The alternator charging voltage is 43 V at 4000 rpm. (an alternator charges in AC.) The regulator/rectifier changes it to the 13.8 - 14.8 V DC.

volts X amps = watts. You can determine the draw from something knowing this formula.

Picture the battery and charging system as a water system. The battery is like a bucket of water. You have a valve in the bottom, which is the electricity going out to the bike and accessories, and a hose in the top adding water, which is like the alternator. You have a float to shut the water off when the water reaches the top of the bucket, which is the regulator. At times you might let more water out than in and the water in the bucket drops. Then at other times you have more coming in than going out and the float stops the flow of water when the bucket is filled. The flow in and out are very seldom equal and it doesn't matter because that is the way the system is designed to work. Everything is fine as long as you don't exceed the capacity of the bucket or the 14 amp hours of the battery

That is basically what is happening when you use a pulse control on electric clothing. More water goes out than in and then the water is turned off at the bottom and more comes in to fill the bucket back up.

You would have to have separate wires for each item gong to a controller to rotate the power between the items. It would look like something that Rube Goldberg would be proud of. It may not keep you as warm because you might need an item on longer that it can be in the cycle.
 

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What I was referring to was his graph that showed the system voltage going to 12V with full load of accessories. The steady state voltage of a wet cell acid battery I'm pretty sure is 12.6V (it's not 12.0000V for sure), so regardless of your charging voltage, which is alway higher than the steady state battery voltage, otherwise it wouldn't be charging, has to be higher than that. If his graph is correct, and I haven't lost my mind on battery voltage, anything less than ~ 12.6V on his graph would indicate the battery was discharging. I'll look into the battery voltage thing again, for acid wet cell types.

Cheers,

John
 
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