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Discussion Starter #1
I just noticed on my new Kenda K-270 (front) that there's NO direction arrow??
( checked both sides )
Is this normal? Can it be mounted both ways?
 

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EDIT: See Post # 8 below. An arrow is shown on the sidewall of a Kenda K270 tire; perhaps the manufacturer indicates directional rotation.

I just noticed on my new Kenda K-270 (front) that there's NO direction arrow??
( checked both sides )
Is this normal? Can it be mounted both ways?
Yes; and . . . yes!

Look for a mark indicating the optimum placement of the valve stem, to facilitate balancing. Might be a little colored dot or something. Or maybe not. Makes little difference, IMHO, but . . . if the mark's there, why not use it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks a bunch, I'm off to the shop!
 

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I just got some a few weeks ago and there was a very small directional arrow, but they are symmetrical so I don't think it matters.

Love them, btw. Good off road and on. Didn't have any of the wobble issues folks mention on road or it just doesn't bother me.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Kenda KL-270's

I just checked the balance on this K-270 front one. 1/2oz seems to be very close.
I didn't see any dot, or arrow, so I just put it on.
All I had for weights were stick-on's. They don't fit the rim, so I'm going to order some spoke types. I didn't know that there is a type of spoke weight, that has a set screw, and is reusable. Anybody out there use that type? Your thoughts on it?
 

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I use the spoke weights. They have a slot in the side that slips over the spoke and then have a friction fit when slid over the spoke nipple. I was having a new tire installed on a road trip and the guy in the shop gave me some extras from his scrap pile. They look like these and do not have/need set screws. http://www.jpcycles.com/product/200-803?utm_source=none&utm_term=[74946229810:product_type_l1==vehicles & parts&+product_type_l2==land vehicles&+product_type_l3==mot&adpos=1o1&creative=42616826650&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CLSkjM_mz8ACFWwQ7AodnBAA5Q

Google "spoke weights" and you will find a bunch.

I have worn out 10 or 12 sets of Kendas k270 tires and have not seen nor expected to see directional arrows. If you can't see any difference in the tread/knob pattern going either way around, it is non-directional, but I still look for arrows on the side. Usually tires that have some sort of arrow point looking pattern are one directional and will have an arrow on the side indicating the direction of rotation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Wheel weights

I use the spoke weights. They have a slot in the side that slips over the spoke and then have a friction fit when slid over the spoke nipple. I was having a new tire installed on a road trip and the guy in the shop gave me some extras from his scrap pile. They look like these and do not have/need set screws. http://www.jpcycles.com/product/200-803?utm_source=none&utm_term=[74946229810:product_type_l1==vehicles & parts&+product_type_l2==land vehicles&+product_type_l3==mot&adpos=1o1&creative=42616826650&device=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclid=CLSkjM_mz8ACFWwQ7AodnBAA5Q

Google "spoke weights" and you will find a bunch.

I have worn out 10 or 12 sets of Kendas k270 tires and have not seen nor expected to see directional arrows. If you can't see any difference in the tread/knob pattern going either way around, it is non-directional, but I still look for arrows on the side. Usually tires that have some sort of arrow point looking pattern are one directional and will have an arrow on the side indicating the direction of rotation.

I have seen the type you show in the link. The ones with the set screw are new to me.

Looks like they could be adjusted for fine tuning the balance?
Quote from last link: "For perfect balance on all types of wheels, the weights' unique design allows them to be stacked on a single spoke or positioned along a spoke's length. "

................... http://www.nomartirechanger.com/category_s/45.htm
................... http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=786255
................... http://www.sportrider.com/no-mar-reusable-spoke-mounted-wheel-weight-kit
 

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These are on both my front and rear k270s just so ya know I'm not nuts. Plan on flipping them eventually, but put them on this direction to begin with.
 

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Discussion Starter #9


These are on both my front and rear k270s just so ya know I'm not nuts. Plan on flipping them eventually, but put them on this direction to begin with.

Thanks Louis! I missed that little mark/arrow. I've been waiting for my spoke weights to come in, so I haven't installed the tire on the bike yet. I think I'll pull it apart to swap it.
Just means I'll get more practice changing a tire. Fine tuning my technique.
 

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Interesting.

The arrow may indicate a recommended direction of rotation keyed by the tire carcass construction, in contrast to the tread design.

DISCLAIMER: Pure speculation on my part; no tangible verifiable evidence supporting the premise.
 

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Interesting.

The arrow may indicate a recommended direction of rotation keyed by the tire carcass construction, in contrast to the tread design.

DISCLAIMER: Pure speculation on my part; no tangible verifiable evidence supporting the premise.
Your guess is as valid as any I've come up with. I save my big thinking for other stuff. i\If there's an arrow, I mount it that way.
 

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Thanks Louis! I missed that little mark/arrow. I've been waiting for my spoke weights to come in, so I haven't installed the tire on the bike yet. I think I'll pull it apart to swap it.
Just means I'll get more practice changing a tire. Fine tuning my technique.
I too missed that tiny little arrow on many sets of Kenda 270 front and rear tires, but looked at a new unmounted set in the garage and saw the little arrows. Then I looked at a new obviously directional tire due to its chevron tread pattern and it has a very large arrow with the words WHEEL ROTATION printed BOLDLY above and below the arrow.

I don't think the little Kenda arrow is to indicate rotation direction.
 

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I don't think the little Kenda arrow is to indicate rotation direction.
Instead, the arrow signifies [complete in 25 words or less]. :)

Maybe an e-mail message to Kenda would precipitate a solution to this mystery . . .

-------------------------------

Kenda K270 tires have a small arrow on the sidewall. Could be a directional rotation arrow, but the tread appears symmetrical.

What is the purpose/significance of the small arrow embossed on the sidewall of Kenda K270 tires?

Thank you for your consideration.

-----------------------------
 

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My K270s don't have that arrow on them. They do have the squiggly mark that is almost obscured by the glare in Larry's photo, though.

Tom
 

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-------------------------------

Kenda K270 tires have a small arrow on the sidewall. Could be a directional rotation arrow, but the tread appears symmetrical.

What is the purpose/significance of the small arrow embossed on the sidewall of Kenda K270 tires?

Thank you for your consideration.

-----------------------------
May I have the envelope, please?
It denotes the way in which the splice is sealed. If you run it in the opposite direction that splice is constantly pulled open instead of pushed closed during operation. That could lead to tire failure.


Gus Niewenhous
Motorcycle Marketing Manager
American Kenda Rubber Industrial Co., LTD
614-729-7878 Direct
614-866-9803 Main
614-866-9805 Fax
 

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That is interesting. I have spent as much time as I would like trying to picture what forces would come into play and it looks to me like half the time any spot on the tire would be pressed together and half the time pulled apart.
 

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That is interesting. I have spent as much time as I would like trying to picture what forces would come into play and it looks to me like half the time any spot on the tire would be pressed together and half the time pulled apart.
Actually, the plies or layers of a tire carcass are not necessarily symmetrically aligned and bonded, I think. Thus, thrust in one radial direction could produce unwanted stresses directed toward a vector tending to separate interfaces, possibly, seems to me.

For a detailed and authoritative explanation, recommend you contact:

Gus Niewenhous
Motorcycle Marketing Manager
American Kenda Rubber Industrial Co., LTD
614-729-7878 Direct
614-866-9803 Main
614-866-9805 Fax

His e-mail address is:

[email protected]

============

Here's a quote corroborating what Gus said:
Replacing the tire starts with checking the direction for fitment. Tires have a direction mark to ensure they rotate the correct way (during the manufacturing process the rubber is wrapped around the tire’s carcass, where the wrap finishes will determine the direction to ensure the rubber will not peel during service). The direction markings are typically an arrow on the side wall with the words “rotation, front wheel fitment” (opposite for the rear tire).
Source: http://classicmotorcycles.about.com/od/serviceandrepair/ig/Classic-Motorcycle-Tire-Changing-/Tire-direction.htm ; of course, K270s don't have all that text, just the arrow.

Avon explains the TREAD SPLICE justification for directional rotation (even with symmetrical tread) here:

http://cyrilhuzeblog.com/2009/08/23/tires-directional-arrows-explained-by-avon-tyres/

The AMA tells us,
The other big reason for noting wheel direction has to do with the manufacturing process. The tread rubber is initially a flat strip that's cut to length, at an angle, and then spliced together with the two ends overlapping, creating a hoop. Under acceleration, a tire mounted backwards will try to peel back this splice. The opposite is true for the front wheel, where directional forces are reversed under hard braking.
(From: http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Riding/Street/Resources/TireDesignations.aspx )

I may have overlooked the tiny arrow on K270s previously; I'll look for it in the future! :)
 

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That's a whole lot of hokey crap!!
The rear tire is subjected to both acceleration and deceleration forces essentially equally. If the splicing could be a factor you would be seeing tread separation at the splice joint, especially on rear tire applications. On front tire applications the greatest force is under braking. The 270 can be used in either front or rear applications. Gus is blowing smoke up our rears!!
Regards....justjeff
 

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That's a whole lot of hokey crap!!
The rear tire is subjected to both acceleration and deceleration forces essentially equally. If the splicing could be a factor you would be seeing tread separation at the splice joint, especially on rear tire applications. On front tire applications the greatest force is under braking. The 270 can be used in either front or rear applications. Gus is blowing smoke up our rears!!
Regards....justjeff
Respectfully, I must disagree with you strongly on one point, justjeff; and declare I harbor a contrary opinion on another! :)

DISAGREE STRONGLY:

"The rear tire is subjected to both acceleration and deceleration forces essentially equally."

Acceleration forces outweigh deceleration, IMHO. Drivetrain acceleration is ALWAYS necessary to obtain forward motion (unless coasting downhill); the bike may be slowed by wind resistance, uphill grade, friction; forces acting with statistically much less force magnitude than the essential drivetrain power applied. I speak of typical service acceleration of motorcyclists in general; there may be riders who "nurse" their machines into forward motion; I'd expect they're rare.

HARBOR CONTRARY OPINION, more-or-less:

" The 270 can be used in either front or rear applications."

While a K270 CAN be used, front or rear, these tires are featured as "FRONT" or "REAR" tires in vendor literature, commensurate with the size offered. Few 3.00-21 tires will be found on rear motorcycle rims, I should think.

Agree that the front tire experiences radial forces in BRAKING, primarily; ample justification for directional rotation to preserve the splice adhesion.

You discredit Gus' explanation, justjeff; however . . . he's in good company. I only cited a FEW of the many hits on the subject confirming the technique of directional rotation to minimize stress on the splice. How do you account for the references posted from ClassicMotorcycles, Avon Tires, and even the American Motorcyclists Association? Are these sources, "blowing smoke," also?

Are these authorities all in error, and your premise (direction of rotation is of no consequence with symmetrical tread tires, if I understand you correctly) is correct?

If so, what is the MOTIVATION of these tire manufacturers and experts to disseminate this allegedly false information? Even to go to the trouble of embossing tires (e.g., the K270s) with a meaningless, inconsequential arrow?

Or, what is the REAL, hidden purpose of the arrow, justjeff?

Are these prevaricators just ribbing us, only for a bit of FUN?

Imagine the conversation, in the employees' lounge at the tire companies: "You know what? We've got 'em mounting our tires as if they were DIRECTIONAL! Just embossed a little arrow on the sidewall, and these fools actually BELIEVE it makes a difference! Yeah! The old, "splice separation" myth! What a laugh!"

Again, I respect your opinion; however--mine is: The rotational direction arrow may actually indicate an optimum direction of rotation for a tire; YMMV! :)

=====================

I know the citations won't "prove" anything; but . . . they're out there!
Some tires are directional and you NEVER want to mount a tire backwards. Why? First off, the way the tread layers are laminated is crucial to directional rotation.
(From http://www.cruisercustomizing.com/guides/how-select-best-tires-your-motorcycle )

Here's another;
As to bias ply tires ... the direction of rotation indicated by the arrow means that as the tire rotates its contact patch will, with EACH revolution, cross from a higher (outside) belt to a lower (inside) belt for each belt juncture along the circumference. That puts NO separation stress on the junctures. Had the tire crossed from lower to higher bias there would be separation stress imposed on the juncture with each and every rotation. The amount of stress is trivial in most cases and would not CAUSE the belts to separate. BUT, if for any other reason the belts began to separate this rotation stress at the contact patch would immediately cause it to become catastrophic. (Rotation caused stress tries to WIDEN the separation if rotating in the wrong direction and tries to close any separation if rotating in the proper direction.)

These too clever by half advocates note that the front tire has its greatest stress during braking while a rear tire has its greatest stress (usually) during acceleration so that reversing the rotation direction of a rear tire mounted on the front 'accommodates' that situation.

Sure, while it also maximizes tire wear, fails to get maximum traction, minimizes anti-hydroplaning, and encourages uneven tire wear (and the resulting premature replacement of a tire that otherwise is just fine.)

Tire rotation direction should ALWAYS match the arrow stamped on the side of the tire. If there is no such arrow, then the tire is not uni-directional and can be mounted to rotate in either direction without concern.
(From http://www.msgroup.org/forums/mtt/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=243 )

Here's a good 'un; can't cut-and-paste this pdf file format, but read, "Section 2-Directional Arrows:" http://www.avonmoto.com/download/Tires_101.pdf

I rest my case; don't take the difference of opinion personally, hope you don't either, justjeff!
 
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